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joshoolhorst
11-29-2016, 06:02 PM
Eagle Vision is one of my favorite things in AC because it has purpose so when I discovered I made a mistake about Eagle Vision I need a reboot for that so can please someone explain it.

So how does Eagle Vision work exactly.
So if every Assassin is trained to use Eagle Vision because every human has the ability to do so how didn't Desmond unlock it in the start of AC1 just the beginning and how does the bleeding effect give you the sixth sense how does it do that? how does it unlock it?
Why did no one notice Al Mualin was ''evil'' like Lucy.
So if all the Assassin's around Altair get brainwashed by the POE by Al Mualin why could Altair resist the Apple? because high concentration of Isu (yeah can somebody expand on that please)
In the book Last Descendants Varius the Assassin said to a woman that she could climb buildings because she described Eagle Vision and said when she hesitated ''It is in your blood'' I know Adam and Eve where the first two humans that stood up against there creator and had Eagle Vision because one of there masters had sex with a human CORRECT me if I am wrong LOL.
How is it possible for kids to use Eagle Vision?
How does one turn yellow, blue and gray?
YES all this for one mistake!
How do you train Eagle Vision?
Shouldn't all doctors in the world know this? Shouldn't people now be used to it?
I find the wiki not helping that much and does emotion have a effect on it and why aren't Shaun, Rebecca, William blue in AC3?

cawatrooper9
11-29-2016, 06:34 PM
Short answer: It's a game mechanic used to simulate a sort of "sixth sense".

Longer answer- The colors that we see are more symbolic of the intuition of the Assassin in question. It's not like, for instance, Ezio looks at his target and literally sees him as red- rather, this is the Animus's attempt to show hos Ezio recognizes his target.

I think that the best way to understand Eagle vision is Edward's musings on it in Black Flag. He tells Kidd that he always had it, but he never really seemed to think much of it. This would imply that he doesn't really enter a crazy grey world where people are painted different colors (as even a country bumpkin like Edward would find that a bit odd) but that it's just a sort of intuition spider sense-like thing that they have.

Lysette88
11-29-2016, 07:31 PM
IMO the eagle vision in the animus is a representation of 3 things basically - focused observation (this is why other less important details are grayed out), intuition and a good guess based on experience (for those parts, where you have eagle vision through walls). Or maybe one could see the see through walls effect as a representation of a deja vu effect - been there, done it, know how it works - something like this and this represented by the animus in form of "see-through walls", while in fact he cannot see through walls of course, it is just a very good guess based on experience mixed with what he hears and what gets intuitively to his mind - like a gut feeling for example.

cawatrooper9
11-29-2016, 08:09 PM
Another few things to point out-

First of all, I don't think it's fair to say that any single person would be "red" or not, such as Al Mualim. Rather, perhaps an Assassin would perceive the Mentor as a threat, and he would then appear red- but it's not some inherent quality he'd have.

Second, I think it's important to consider different types of Eagle vision. We see different abilities across games. Ezio's Eagle vision gets a little bit of an upgrade in Revelations, for instance, and Edward's lets him track targets through opaque objects. Similarly, Arno's is so different that the name of the ability is actually switched to "Eagle Pulse"!

I guess it could be thought of as a sort of mutation. Technically that's exactly what it is, as it seems to follow bloodlines, and maybe the mutation varies a little person to person (or rather, bloodline to bloodline).

Elder-Kalakta
11-29-2016, 09:32 PM
Juno does seem to hint that Eagle Vision is a lot more than just inner intuition.

She literally states "you see the blue shimmer and hear the voices" in reference to the blue hue of Eagle Vision and how we're able to hear people's voices so clearly from great distances while eavesdropping on them even in crowded places.

It's basically a very diluted form of the Isu's Sixth Sense of Knowledge. But we do not "know", only "see the blue shimmer and hear the voices." So it's something that's not fully understood by humans and hence why not everyone unlocks it despite having "the potential to know" as she says.

The reason why our vision changes, my friend and I speculate that the Isu may have had a specific gland or a part of their brain dedicated just to the Sense. Our 30% smaller brains lack this area and so, because the brain is good at re purposing itself even during brain damage by allocating tasks to other areas, it has made the ocular regions of the brain dedicated to trying to "perceive" the sense which makes it much more visual for us while for the Isu it'd likely be a very natural and likely constant state of being, for us, it has to be "activated."

When trying to think of how an Isu sees the world, think of it like Sherlock Holmes on cognitive steroids and some hardcore LSD. By looking at your face, they'd be able to analyze the most minute micro-expressions and probably give you a Hannibal Lecture on 90% of your life and why you turned out the way you did... and then they'd ask for an ice cream and further dissect you mentally behind the philosophical reasons on the flavour you picked for them.

Ok, maybe I am exaggerating on the last bit. XD But they would likely be able to tell a lot about a person based on their posture, face expression and usually unnoticeable movements. They'd also be instant lie detectors.

But this isn't foolproof. Like with all senses, even Eagle Sense can be tricked. Ever seen illusions? That's tricking your visual sense, then there's auditory illusions and even some scent illusions. Ever smell that nice cake that isn't even there sometimes? I suspect Eagle Sense can be fooled. A lot of it can be influenced by thoughts, like my scent example, when I think of nice food I can smell it sometimes. Perhaps Desmond was so convinced that Lucy was friendly, he saw her as blue.

Or, Lucy displayed all the behaviours of a friendly person and fooled his Eagle Sense under the illusion of a friend. Remember, Desmond's Sense is very weak and diluted whereas Juno knew Lucy was a traitor despite having never met her in person.

SixKeys
11-29-2016, 09:42 PM
Some of your questions go so deep one might almost suspect you believe Eagle Vision actually exists. No-one knows how Eagle Vision is trained, any more than we can speculate how assassins train themselves to survive 200 feet drops into bales of hay. :p It's best to keep in mind that this is, in the end, just a game and the creators can't have possibly thought of everything.

cawatrooper9
11-29-2016, 10:23 PM
Kalakta has a pretty good point. Honestly, I think that the lore of Eagle Vision is about as inconsistent as the gameplay mechanics behind it.

I would point out that the Isu are pretty meta, though, and maybe their observation of the "blue shimmer" is an observation to the player rather than the historical Assassin.

Sorrosyss
11-29-2016, 11:31 PM
Elder-Kalakta summed it up really well. In the end it really is just a portion of the sixth sense - knowledge. The more precursor DNA you have, the stronger it seemingly is. Which in theory means, all the geniuses in History could have had it. But thats a discussion for another day. ;)

Elder-Kalakta
11-29-2016, 11:50 PM
SixKeys, are you telling me that Eagle Vision doesn't exist!? That we're just inferior five sensed creatures She paints us to be? :eek: :p

But yeah, in the end it's just another game mechanic such as "Detective Mode" in the Batman Arkham games. Although in-universe, there was a technological reason behind Detective Mode. I enjoyed coming up with scientific reasons for why it'd exist in the AC universe as it's an innate trait of the characters.

Cawatrooper, I'd explain those inconsistencies more to do with the characters themselves. Like for instance, some people pay attention and notice things better than others. So in-universe, some people's Eagle Senses are more refined and their minds more tuned into processing them.

Sorrosyss, I wonder the same, if our geniuses had lots of Precursor genes. :p It reminds me of Destroy All Humans, where whenever you collect brain stems from scientists or some powerful and intelligent people, you always get more Furon DNA lol.

Lysette88
11-29-2016, 11:55 PM
The animus recreates a simulation of memories. Memories which are quite old and old memories are not always correct and sometimes they distort as well time. Think of it, sometimes we might claim to have known something in advance - like people sometimes claim "I knew it", but in fact they didn't, sometimes they did not even expect it, but after the fact this is so logical to them, that they think, they would have always known this. These "see-through-walls" effects in eagle vision could be of that kind. It is not really a prediction where those targets behind walls are, but the illusion, to have known this in advance, even it got into memory after the fact to have actually seen those targets. And if not, this can be imagined "fact" - memories are not exact representations of what was, but more interpretations of it. In the animus these interpretations are recreated basically, it is not what really happened, but what that person remembered to be true - just that not all, what we remember as true, was really true.

A typical example of such a misinterpretation what really happened in real life is "love at first sight" - after the fact to have fallen in love with this person, it seems impossible, to not have fallen in love to him/her instantly - and this creates the interpretation of "love at first sight" - even it wasn't that way.

cawatrooper9
11-29-2016, 11:59 PM
Right- in the first game Vidic praises the Animus as being a tool with which we can subjectively view history, but that's not entirely accurate. While we're seeing history through an ancestor's eyes, we're literally seeing it unfold through their own "lens". Some of the best examples of this are Arno and Edward's drunken stupors. We're not seeing what's really unfolding, but how the alcohol affects their own perception.

Lysette88
11-30-2016, 12:06 AM
This has certainly some truth to it, Elder-Kalakta, whenever I watch a let's play video of a fps shooter and the guy playing says "I see you" and starts firing at a target, I think just "what? How could he have possibly seen that person" - some people have really eagle vision and a talent to spot targets, because they are used to and good gamers. That is a bit like when I fly with someone in our helicopter and I point some landmarks out on the ground, people who are not used to see the world from above have a hard time to spot it and they are pretty incapable to see details, like I see them, because I am used to this perspective and in that situation I have eagle view - basically because my life could depend on that I see details around my aircraft. My responsibility as pilot in command leads to that, just like a good gamer will spot targets far before I could see them. I would be a pretty bad fps player, because I spot targets too late if at all. Such "eagle vision" is more a matter of practice, instincts and experience.

Edit: pretty perfect example, cawatropper9 - you nailed it.

Elder-Kalakta
11-30-2016, 12:08 AM
Yeah. Also traumatic memories can be difficult to access through the Animus because of the ancestor's own attempt to block it when they were alive.

Desmond had to deal with this through Ezio. A character in the recent comics had to deal with this too and the comic explores the consequences this can have on the viewer as well.

I think the gameplay sections of the Animus are merely corrupted memories that can't be fully read. So the player uses this "gameplay" as a bridge to cross to the actual memory (the cutscene). I remember someone on this forum mentioning something like that years ago which was an interesting way of looking at it.


This has certainly some truth to it, Elder-Kalakta, whenever I watch a let's play video of a fps shooter and the guy playing says "I see you" and starts firing at a target, I think just "what? How could he have possibly seen that person" - some people have really eagle vision and a talent to spot targets, because they are used to and good gamers. That is a bit like when I fly with someone in our helicopter and I point some landmarks out on the ground, people who are not used to see the world from above have a hard time to spot it and they are pretty incapable to see details, like I see them, because I am used to this perspective and in that situation I have eagle view - basically because my life could depend on that I see details around my aircraft. My responsibility as pilot in command leads to that, just like a good gamer will spot targets far before I could see them. I would be a pretty bad fps player, because I spot targets too late if at all. Such "eagle vision" is more a matter of practice, instincts and experience.

A lot of our traits depend on the individual, it's amazing how diverse people are. The Sixth Sense would work that way too, you see it in how Ezio's and Altair's are different, and Arno's is the most different.

Lysette88
11-30-2016, 12:29 AM
That is a perfect way to look at it - basically what we play in the animus is "filling in the blanks" between those cut-scenes, which are the actual memory - very good point, Elder-Kalakta.

Elder-Kalakta
11-30-2016, 06:15 AM
Thank you, Lysette88.

This helps us get around things like "why are there haystacks conveniently placed near high places?"

It's just the Animus' way of making it easier for us to cross the bridge faster to the memory. There may have never actually been a haystack over there, and Altair would've had to climb all the way back down. Ezio may never had killed anyone in a particular mission but the gameplay section lets us do it anyway. Some of the parkour fails we make would've been crippling, if it happened in a cutscene, the ancestor would've been genuinely injured.

How do you think the language translator was able to tell Adam and Eve's words? We know the Animus uses some translator to allow us to understand what Altair or Ezio said, and we know it's not perfect because some of Ezio's Italian slipped through. We also know it didn't translate Connor's tribe's language at all.

Maybe for the Isu language, it relied more on guess work. "Adam" could've meant "brother" for all we know. "I have it" could've just been the Animus guessing that's the most likely phrase she uttered. I ask because in the Phoenix Project video, the narrator says "ancient languages will be unlocked to us," basically saying we have no clue what the Isu spoke and yet we understood what Adam and Eve said in The Truth and in the Bleeding Effect level of Lost Archives.

cawatrooper9
11-30-2016, 03:39 PM
Thank you, Lysette88.

This helps us get around things like "why are there haystacks conveniently placed near high places?"

It's just the Animus' way of making it easier for us to cross the bridge faster to the memory. There may have never actually been a haystack over there, and Altair would've had to climb all the way back down. Ezio may never had killed anyone in a particular mission but the gameplay section lets us do it anyway. Some of the parkour fails we make would've been crippling, if it happened in a cutscene, the ancestor would've been genuinely injured.


That's an interesting way of looking at it. Welcome to the forums, btw, Kalakta, looks like you have some really interesting ideas!

You may be on to something, but as far as haystacks go, I think my interpretation would be this:
The haystacks really were there- however, like any action the ancestor took, what happens in the animus may not be a direct copy of it.

It's sort of like (and I have just a really basic understanding of this) quantum mechanics. Back when the ancestor lived, there were countless (literally infinity) binary choices made at the atomic level and building up. For instance, at the lowest level, if might be: "does this particular electron head this direction (in time or space) or does it not?" Then, that question is repeated infinitely for all electrons constantly.

At a more recognizeable level, we might see something like "does Ezio jump off this building into hay, or does he not" (of course taking into account the many other, sub-questions that would have had to be asked as well)?

We also see stuff like "does Ezio stab this civillian, or does he not"? And this is where it gets interesting. Because the Animus could almost be seen as a basic model of multiverse theory (very basic and limited in scope, of course) we can see Ezio making all sorts of choices that he presumably didn't really make during his life. However, the Animus has a very specific set of standards that Ezio's character follows, called "synchronization"- this is a meter that (as I'm sure you know) measures how closely the Animus is following Ezio's actual life. Now, small things like whether Ezio walked home, ran, or rode a horse aren't usually going to cause issues with synchronization, as they are usually not important to Ezio's core being.

However, certain things are- including Ezio's principles and his physical limitations.. That's why we can have Ezio steal from civillians and even the poor (because the guy was kind of a jerk like that) but we usually cannot have him kill civilians. It's also why he can't survive a jump off of a tall tower or serious weapon wounds- the real Ezio would've surely died as well.

As far as cutscenes go, they almost seem like refreshers to get us back on track with synchronization (especially in ACIII, when cutscenes force the "canon" robes on Connor- not that that's a glitch or anything.... :p) In some cases, we even see synch refilled after a cutscene.

tldr: Bushes may have actually been there, but whether or not the Assassin jumped into them is pretty up in the air.

SixKeys
11-30-2016, 08:41 PM
The haystacks (at least some of them) were put in the simulation by either Lucy or Rebecca to help Desmond navigate his ancestor's memories. This was mentioned in one of the manuals. With that in mind, it's questionable how much of the gameplay is accurate and how much is artificial, inserted only to bridge the user's experience and the ancestor's memories, as Elder-Kalakta suggests.

When I learned about the haybales, I pretty much gave up on trying to figure out how much of what we're seeing is Animus trickery and how much is accurate to the ancestor's memories. I don't think about that stuff while I'm playing, anyway. When I'm running on the rooftops of Florence, I don't think of myself as Desmond in a simulation, I think I'm Ezio and that most of what I experience is how it really happened in his memories. I don't view the gameplay sections as separate from the cut scenes (which are definitively synchronized memories), in my mind everything I do is how it really happened until I mess up and die.

cawatrooper9
11-30-2016, 09:41 PM
The haystacks (at least some of them) were put in the simulation by either Lucy or Rebecca to help Desmond navigate his ancestor's memories. This was mentioned in one of the manuals. With that in mind, it's questionable how much of the gameplay is accurate and how much is artificial, inserted only to bridge the user's experience and the ancestor's memories, as Elder-Kalakta suggests.

Interesting, I didn't know that was actually part of the lore.

I agree, though- while I love the MD story, I think it's important for it to be a reprieve from the game's main story, not some omnipresent, constantly fourth-wall breaking mechanic. That's why I'm glad the game features less "glitches" in memories lately. I honestly wouldn't mind an MD frame story with an immersive "no questions asked" historical story. I can look past Animus logic if the game is good.

Though, to be honest, I do appreciate the work that the team used to make in trying their best to make a concept like the Animus watertight. It might not have worked, but it was an admirable try.

Elder-Kalakta
12-01-2016, 12:12 AM
That's an interesting way of looking at it. Welcome to the forums, btw, Kalakta, looks like you have some really interesting ideas!

You may be on to something, but as far as haystacks go, I think my interpretation would be this:
The haystacks really were there- however, like any action the ancestor took, what happens in the animus may not be a direct copy of it.

It's sort of like (and I have just a really basic understanding of this) quantum mechanics. Back when the ancestor lived, there were countless (literally infinity) binary choices made at the atomic level and building up. For instance, at the lowest level, if might be: "does this particular electron head this direction (in time or space) or does it not?" Then, that question is repeated infinitely for all electrons constantly.

At a more recognizeable level, we might see something like "does Ezio jump off this building into hay, or does he not" (of course taking into account the many other, sub-questions that would have had to be asked as well)?

We also see stuff like "does Ezio stab this civillian, or does he not"? And this is where it gets interesting. Because the Animus could almost be seen as a basic model of multiverse theory (very basic and limited in scope, of course) we can see Ezio making all sorts of choices that he presumably didn't really make during his life. However, the Animus has a very specific set of standards that Ezio's character follows, called "synchronization"- this is a meter that (as I'm sure you know) measures how closely the Animus is following Ezio's actual life. Now, small things like whether Ezio walked home, ran, or rode a horse aren't usually going to cause issues with synchronization, as they are usually not important to Ezio's core being.

However, certain things are- including Ezio's principles and his physical limitations.. That's why we can have Ezio steal from civillians and even the poor (because the guy was kind of a jerk like that) but we usually cannot have him kill civilians. It's also why he can't survive a jump off of a tall tower or serious weapon wounds- the real Ezio would've surely died as well.

As far as cutscenes go, they almost seem like refreshers to get us back on track with synchronization (especially in ACIII, when cutscenes force the "canon" robes on Connor- not that that's a glitch or anything.... :p) In some cases, we even see synch refilled after a cutscene.

tldr: Bushes may have actually been there, but whether or not the Assassin jumped into them is pretty up in the air.

Thanks Cawatrooper.

Those are some really interesting thoughts. I think you're onto something in the sense that the Animus would've also had to rely on a lot of probability work as well.

Remember how in one file it's mentioned that really ancient DNA may be too damaged to read if recovered from a sample? Perhaps similar stuff may happen even in living people, the further back you go, the more corrupted and overwritten some memories might be so the Animus would have to do lots of digging and guessing. Also I remember reading that some of the things we see even in cutscenes may not actually be as they appeared. (I'm looking at you, vanishing faces with floating eyes and teeth glitches. :D)

The DNA memory simply is a written code of what the ancestor remembered. It's like reading pages in a book and your mind trying to visualize it. Imagine if two different models of an Animus with their own programming read the same DNA, one might see details that wouldn't show up in the other.

It's really interesting to try and think about how this technology might work and just how reliable it is. It's certainly more reliable than some history books, but not 100%. Which gives Ubisoft an excuse for any historical inaccuracies :p

SixKeys summed it up really well too. I can relate to how she plays because that's how I played Assassin's Creed 2 as well. Also when I free roam in Black Flag, I just like to pretend I'm a random pirate plundering things.

Twinfryes
12-01-2016, 07:05 AM
Okay, so, in reply to the initial question about Eagle vision:



So if every Assassin is trained to use Eagle Vision because every human has the ability to do…

Assassins are NOT all trained with Eagle vision; It's been shown to be a rare ability, which can be learned, but not easily. Gavin Banks has mentioned having learned to use it, but he's also mentioned that it gives him a headache to use. Mary Read suggests that the Caribbean Assassins of her time are taught Eagle vision, but it obviously was not taught to assassins in all settings, since Giovanni Auditore mentions it as something unique to Ezio ("Your Gift"), and Gavin is the only one of the modern Assassins who's demonstrated learned-Eagle Vision.


so how didn't Desmond unlock it in the start of AC1 just the beginning and how does the bleeding effect give you the sixth sense how does it do that? how does it unlock it?

Well, as mentioned, the Average Assassin isn't taught to use Eagle Vision. Desmond probably never learned. As for how he didn't acquire it naturally, like his ancestors… I suspect it's a matter of lifestyle.

By my reckoning, it's like how all human babies are born with the instinctive ability to swim. If you put your baby in a pool when it's young, it will know how to paddle, how to how it's breath, etc., but if you take too long to out it in the water, the instinct will fade; you'll have to teach the child to swim, rather than letting its instincts take over. Desmond's ancestors were like the baby thrown in the water; they were raised in scenarios that kept their eagle vision active, with Altair being trained from birth to track people down, in an environment where he got practice noticing when people meant him harm, Ezio being raised in a bustling city where he had reason to practice noticing things, and Connor growing up playing games and learning to hunt, allowing his senses to stay active.
Desmond may have been born with the instinctive ability to use Eagle vision, but he wasn't put into a position where it particularly benefitted him early enough in life, so he didn’t ever practice the ability. Even if he'd known it existed, which he presumably didn't until after Abstergo kidnapped him, he wouldn't have known how to activate it. Altair did, though, and by reliving Altair's memories, Desmond "remembered" how to activate his sixth sense.




So how does Eagle Vision work exactly.

Well, there isn't a complete canon answer to that, but we can speculate. All we know for sure is that it is a sixth sense which was possessed by the first Civilization, and that, while all humans have the potential to use it, it is strongest in, and comes more naturally to those who possess higher concentrations of Isu DNA.

As for the exact function of eagle vision… I speculate that it is tied to the entire nervous system, taking in Semi-visual, semi-tactile data, and that the Isu possessed a specific lobe within their brains dedicated to processing this data.

I believe that this sense was a sort of hyper-sensitivity to Electro-magnetic fields. It probably evolved as a way of tracking prey, but once the Isu developed into tight knit civilizations, the sense evolved in a way that allowed them to pick up on Electro magnetic output from the brains of others, thus allowing them to judge things such as Emotion, intention, etc. I believe this is why the Isu seem cold to us; they could judge each others emotions by eagle sense, so they don't physically display their emotions as much as we do.

This sense is presumably controlled by a multitude of genes; All humans possess the basic genes necessary to use a rudimentary form of Eagle Vision, but people with more Isu in them can have more of the genes which play into the sense, hence why some people can 'see' through walls or track someone's path, while others can only tell whether someone is a friend or foe.

As Elder Kalkata mentioned, I believe that the Isu possessed a specific portion of the brain dedicated to Eagle Sense, but humans, lacking this piece of the brain, shift the processing of Eagle Vision into other parts of the brain, primarily the Occipital Lobe. This is why humans perceive the sense as being "Vision", because even though it's technically a unique sense, it's mostly processed in the brain's vision center.





Why did no one notice Al Mualin was ''evil'' like Lucy.



Well, as I mentioned, Altair was probably the only Assassin with Eagle Vision. It wasn't exactly a well known thing; it's unlikely anyone trained with the sense until long after Altair and Ezio. On top of that, I don't think Eagle vision really provides one with information on the true alignment of the person examined, just their current intentions. Al Mualim didn't intend Altair any harm until after he'd gotten everything he wanted, so Altair's Eagle vision would've recognized him as an ally. An Isu might've recognized his true intentions, or someone with more honed senses, like Ezio in his old age, but young Altair's eagle vision wasn't sensitive enough for that.

Alternatively, it could be a matter of the Animus simulating what it thinks Altair would've seen in Eagle vision… I mean, maybe Altair never actually used his Eagle vision on Al Mualim, so when the Animus User looks at him with the sense, the Animus just fills in the blank based on how it thinks Al Mualim should appear with Eagle Vision.



So if all the Assassin's around Altair get brainwashed by the POE by Al Mualin why could Altair resist the Apple? because high concentration of Isu (yeah can somebody expand on that please) I know Adam and Eve where the first two humans that stood up against there creator and had Eagle Vision because one of there masters had sex with a human

Alright, that one's easy to explain. The Isu designed us to be controlled by PoEs, but were immune themselves. Humans with more Isu DNA lack the Neurotransmitters which allow the PoEs to fully control our minds, though they can still create hallucinations and such.

Adam and Eve were both Half Isu, half Human, and therefore immune to the control of PoEs, and possessing of Eagle Sense. They weren't necessarily the first to revolt, but they did become the leaders of the rebellion, which included many other hybrids as well as them.



how does one turn yellow, blue and gray?

That's just how the animus shows eagle vision. It may or may not actually look like that. I like to think of it as being less literal colours and more the perception of colours… Like, "That person feels blue" in the same way one might say "Blue is a cold colour".



[/B]How do you train Eagle Vision?
Shouldn't all doctors in the world know this? Shouldn't people now be used to it?


The same way you train anything; practice. Who knows what exactly this practice entails; probably a lot of focus, meditation (or hallucinogens) may be involved. Who knows. The human body is capable of doing plenty of things we can't explain; Some people are able to control their body temperature with meditation. Weird ****. Doctors can't explain that, and most people have never heard about it.

Lysette88
12-01-2016, 10:40 PM
Actually controlling body temperature and stuff like this is part of autogenic training, which has a 2nd tier to it, self-hypnosis - I have learnt that method from a psychiatrist. It can be used to strengthen certain features as well, like confidence and overall lead to a positive way of looking at things, which support the ability to be successful in a variety of ways. The method is a form of self-suggestive technique and it requires to first get into a relaxation state in a certain matter. It really can be trained, it takes quite long for beginners to reach this relaxation state, but it is just a matter of seconds for trained people. Once the relaxation state is reached, one can use certain formula to have suggestive effects onto oneself, which over time (in many sessions like this) will actually have an effect on your psyche. This is one of the reasons why people with any kind of psychotic disorder should not learn this and to properly learn it, a psychiatrist with experience in this technique is good to have - especially if the 2nd tier of self-hypnosis is attempted, which can be dangerous for the mind with an unstable personality or used in the wrong way.

Some of the every day effects I can easily achieve with it are

1. to fall asleep whenever I have to, regardless of how much noise is around me - takes me 2-3 seconds to be in deep sleep
2. to stay awake and be fit, if I have to, by tapping into the body's own emergency energy - this has an effect stronger than caffeine for a couple of hours
3. wake up at a certain time without to use an alarm clock - it is just amazing how well the body can keep track of time actually
4. erase any nervosity in trail/test situations or when I have to stay focused, it can deal with anxiety as well

I used the last for example before exams and before I had to jump out of a plane in parachute training - I really do not like to do this, but using this technique freed me from the fear to do what my body did not want to do - namely jump out of a plane at that height. I use autogenic training as well before I have to give a talk, to get rid of any nervosity and perform well - it is a quite useful technique and can be learnt in a few weeks with daily training.

Twinfryes
12-01-2016, 10:43 PM
That's interesting.

Lysette88
12-01-2016, 11:15 PM
As far as body temperature goes, the effect is not huge - but it can be used to suppress a light fever - even it is questionable if that is beneficial. The body has fever by quite good reasons. Other things like heart beat rate and such can be influenced, that is why people with any kind of heart disease have to be very careful with this. Calming down heart rate and keeping the mind active is part of the relaxation training. If the last formula for keeping the mind active is not performed, one will fall into deep sleep. If it is overused it can lead to unconsciousness or even to fall into a coma - that is why one should not do that without professional help, when one is learning this.