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View Full Version : London: Great city, gets boring really fast



Namikaze_17
09-10-2016, 07:35 AM
By all means the city is great and is filled with life, but the overload of collectibles, lack of interiors, little to no trains(or fights for that matter), and lack of any other city to go to makes the whole experience sorta boring and tiring to look at after awhile.

Everything just becomes predictable and repetitive ("Stop thief", "Stealth kill messenger", "Kill Criminals", etc.) Add to the fact that there's hardly any small activities to do like a riding bicycle, drinking in a pub, playing a game, or hell, maybe even sailing my own boat! It's just carriages and collecting. Overall I still like it all well enough; and I don't want to sound like I'm complaining, but it all feels a bit tame & underdeveloped to me after replaying it now.

Helforsite
09-10-2016, 01:47 PM
I agree. While the city looks gorgeous, there is nothing interesting to do once you finish the story.

ladosefan
09-10-2016, 04:51 PM
I loved taking strolls in unexplored areas of London listening to citizens talk,watching their activities or observing the interior of beautiful houses :rolleyes:

m4r-k7
09-10-2016, 05:59 PM
I agree, it is a great city and overall I preferred Syndicate to Unity, but its the first AC game where I literally have no desire to go back to it at all

Megas_Doux
09-10-2016, 07:37 PM
I feel you.....

I mean, I prefer London (ACS) over Paris (Unity) despite the downgrade in terms of population and quantity/quality of interiors because of the freaking Thames and the fact I was really getting tired of the XVIII century. However there's not much to do, a common sin for almost any AC to date with the exception of AC IV and its ugly brother Rogue, indeed. But one that you perceive more here not just because London is the ONLY location in the game but also since we only get to visit is most urban part....

I said it with unity and repeat myself with syndicate: I would have loved to see other areas aside from just a big urban environment such as a castle surrounded by a countryside (Windsor, Highclere Castle, mentmore towers) Stonehenge, a big level/sequence/mission in Liverpool, etc, etc.....

D.I.D.
09-10-2016, 09:33 PM
No Assassin's Creed has much for you after you've finished the missions, but this one has more than any AC has had before (continuing races, cargo hijacks, boat raids). It has missions after the story has finished (Victoria).

There is a more life in this AC than any before. If observation and eavesdropping amuses you, there is a wealth of it here. We've had threads full of this; how many games actually allow you to swap anecdotal stories of the things you've stumbled upon that other players didn't see, to this extent?

It has fewer interiors, yes, but fewer interiors than what? Unity: the last game that was getting it in the neck, but now gets gradually more acceptance as time goes by.

There's a gap between every AC game as it actually is, and the magical AC game in our heads. Every new AC closes that gap, just a little bit more. But for getting us closer and yet tantalisingly exposing that gap, we're less kind to the new and kinder to the old.

Fatal-Feit
09-10-2016, 11:58 PM
No Assassin's Creed has much for you after you've finished the missions, but this one has more than any AC has had before (continuing races, cargo hijacks, boat raids). It has missions after the story has finished (Victoria).

There is a more life in this AC than any before. If observation and eavesdropping amuses you, there is a wealth of it here. We've had threads full of this; how many games actually allow you to swap anecdotal stories of the things you've stumbled upon that other players didn't see, to this extent?

It has fewer interiors, yes, but fewer interiors than what? Unity: the last game that was getting it in the neck, but now gets gradually more acceptance as time goes by.

There's a gap between every AC game as it actually is, and the magical AC game in our heads. Every new AC closes that gap, just a little bit more. But for getting us closer and yet tantalisingly exposing that gap, we're less kind to the new and kinder to the old.

You're right, London does truly offer a wealth of activities to do once you've completed the game, especially compared to the past game. If you remove Unity's coop components, Syndicate is the only SP AC with strong open world free-roam activities with replay value. I also think one of the most underrated aspects of London is the level of detail that goes into the scenery. Almost everything in the levels, from the placement of the flowers to the graffiti on the walls, has been hand placed and it gives quite a bit of life and artistry to each corner. And a lot of the NPC placements weren't randomly generated; if you take the time to smell the roses, you can actually listen to some interesting dialogue from them.

I think the issue with London feeling tiresome for some players, like myself, doesn't have to do with what it has, but what it's got to deal with, which is player familiarity. After what feels like a dozen AC games, a lot the level designs are a 'been here, done that' kind of ordeal and the developers didn't do a good enough job of keeping its activities feeling fresh for its players. In fact, the game kind of amplifies what bores players in most of the previous AC games, such as the collectibles and lack of difficulty. It also doesn't help that Syndicate regresses the gameplay mechanics from Unity more so than 'innovated'.

Namikaze_17
09-11-2016, 01:46 AM
Well the world is clearly full of life and activity. That's without question. But what's the point when I can't really interact with said "world".
I can admire the parks, but I can't sit down. I can admire the pubs, but can't take a drink. I can admire St.Paul's Cathedral, but I can't go inside. And I can admire people playing a game of cricket or chess, but I can't get a turn. :(

I can't really stress enough the many cool-looking things I can't interact with (other then scripted ones) in Syndicate. Maybe it hurts the immersion? Something. But it does add to London feeling a bit restricted to me after some time.


I said it with unity and repeat myself with syndicate: I would have loved to see other areas aside from just a big urban environment such as a castle surrounded by a countryside (Windsor, Highclere Castle, mentmore towers) Stonehenge, a big level/sequence/mission in Liverpool, etc, etc.....

Indeed. It would've been nice if we could've had Crawley or somewhere else to go to for a change of pace.

Megas_Doux
09-11-2016, 04:32 PM
Well the world is clearly full of life and activity. That's without question. But what's the point when I can't really interact with said "world".
I can admire the parks, but I can't sit down. I can admire the pubs, but can't take a drink. I can admire St.Paul's Cathedral, but I can't go inside. And I can admire people playing a game of cricket or chess, but I can't get a turn. :(

.

London being downgraded is a shame indeed.......



. It would've been nice if we could've had Crawley or somewhere else to go to for a change of pace.

.

And then, ok!!!! In terms of variety it is known fact that cities during the victorian era look rather similar -think of AC III New York and Boston level of similar- but why not more rifts related to the story of the shroud and stuff during medieval England -the baron's war, may be- for instance????

Again, the curse of annual games......

Xstantin
09-11-2016, 09:15 PM
\What killed London for me was repetitive structure for capturing the districts.

I still prefer Paris cause I think it had a better "mix" of architecture overall, but seeing Thames for the first time was rather awesome

Namikaze_17
09-11-2016, 10:05 PM
@Mega

Sure, why not? I liked the WWI portion of the game, even more than the main one in some aspects, though I wish we could've explored more. As for the downgrade, yeah. London feels like steps forward & back at the same time lol

Off-topic: Aww, why the name change Kevt? :(

Xstantin
09-11-2016, 11:26 PM
Off-topic: Aww, why the name change Kevt? :(

Matches my PSN id now :p

cawatrooper9
09-12-2016, 02:45 PM
See, I remember a trailer for Unity where they bragged about how different the various Paris district would feel... but honestly, they all felt pretty much the same to me. The architecture was cool, for sure, but if you dropped me in any spot on the map in which I didn't have a clear view of any big monuments, there's no way I could tell you what district I was in.

In Syndicate, the districts had more flavor. I can pretty easily tell where I am at any given time. I think that the argument that the city doesn't have a lot to do once you're done liberating has some merit (because honestly, carriage races might be an option, but do you actually want to do them?) but at has already been pointed out, that's just how AC is. The only back and forth between districts in the past has been with Revelations, and that aspect of the game was actually received pretty negatively.

Personally, the only games that I think had a ton of playability after beating the campaign are:

Unity- co-op missions
Black Flag/Syndicate- tons of exploring and random ship encounters

Everything else eventually pretty much just winds down.

Ureh
09-12-2016, 10:17 PM
Depends on the spot, I guess.

Like if someone showed the champs elysses, there isn't any monument but all the trees should give it away. From many povs in champs de mars we can cut out the academy but if you saw the artillery storages, shooting ranges, military camps, recruit tents, or the open fields, you'd know it's in the invalides district. If you saw a pic of the tanning/leather factories and districts, you'd know it's the Bievre district since no other place has all those pits and smoke. I think the Bievre district also had small canals which no other part had. Can't remember the name of the district with de Sade and all the courtesans but that's pretty unique and has less notable landmarks that can't be seen from most street levels. The Marais district is notable because of the festivals, plays, actors, music, aristocrats... most of the thoroughfares here don't have any clear view of the bastille. I haven't really explored much of the court of miracles district so I'm not sure how distinct it is. These are just some of the differences I can remember, so some are a bit subtle. I think the advantage is that this makes the districts more seamless, so the player isn't like.. "Woah the things around me changed so I'm in another district." Like some of the cities in the real world, the change is more gradual.

Syndicate's districts focused on drastic change of the buildings as soon as you the pass the invisible lines: in whitechapel the houses and buildings are older/shorter, city of london you've got taller buildings with a lot more signs, in southwark it's all factories, Lambeth is less dense version of whitechapel. I haven't really explored much of the strand or westminster but they felt pretty similar with the same upper class residential areas, parks, etc.

For me, it was harder to remember the names of ACU's districts than recognizing where I was. Often times I was like, "Oh so I'm in that place with all those stuff."

Whereas in London's boroughs, I could pronounce: whitechapel, city of london, southwark, thames, lambeth, strand, westminster.

Both games had a lot of copy/paste npc set pieces, however ACU had a lot more variety (which probably went noticed). So when certain npcs start showing up, or certain crowd events started appearing then you'd know that you're in a certain district (ex: two bullies picking on a woman means you're in the south-east districts, beggars mean you're in south-west, or torch bearers and hooded executioners mean you're in SE, or torch bearers and courtesans usually means NW, etc). For me I spent less time looking at these things because they either didn't speak at all and/or I couldn't understand them.

D.I.D.
09-21-2016, 02:48 PM
You're right, London does truly offer a wealth of activities to do once you've completed the game, especially compared to the past game. If you remove Unity's coop components, Syndicate is the only SP AC with strong open world free-roam activities with replay value. I also think one of the most underrated aspects of London is the level of detail that goes into the scenery. Almost everything in the levels, from the placement of the flowers to the graffiti on the walls, has been hand placed and it gives quite a bit of life and artistry to each corner. And a lot of the NPC placements weren't randomly generated; if you take the time to smell the roses, you can actually listen to some interesting dialogue from them.

I think the issue with London feeling tiresome for some players, like myself, doesn't have to do with what it has, but what it's got to deal with, which is player familiarity. After what feels like a dozen AC games, a lot the level designs are a 'been here, done that' kind of ordeal and the developers didn't do a good enough job of keeping its activities feeling fresh for its players. In fact, the game kind of amplifies what bores players in most of the previous AC games, such as the collectibles and lack of difficulty. It also doesn't help that Syndicate regresses the gameplay mechanics from Unity more so than 'innovated'.

Yeah, I guess. A lot of people were somehow bored with London before it had even released, I suppose because it's an old European city and we've had a lot of British characters cropping up in other games.

cawatrooper9
09-21-2016, 03:40 PM
Yeah, I guess. A lot of people were somehow bored with London before it had even released, I suppose because it's an old European city and we've had a lot of British characters cropping up in other games.

That, and London has been in a lot of games before. We even got it earlier in 2015 with The Order, or whatever that game was called.

Personally, I love when AC goes off the grid a little. The North Atlantic, Colonial era Boston, Renaissance Istanbul, 12th century Acre- these are settings that don't pop up all that often in video games. London, as great and influential as the city is, is a dime a dozen. It's much like how, even though I'd love for a fully MD AC game, I'd absolutely hate for it to be set in New York City.

D.I.D.
09-21-2016, 03:48 PM
That, and London has been in a lot of games before. We even got it earlier in 2015 with The Order, or whatever that game was called.

Personally, I love when AC goes off the grid a little. The North Atlantic, Colonial era Boston, Renaissance Istanbul, 12th century Acre- these are settings that don't pop up all that often in video games. London, as great and influential as the city is, is a dime a dozen. It's much like how, even though I'd love for a fully MD AC game, I'd absolutely hate for it to be set in New York City.

There really aren't many games set in London, though. It's like everyone rolled their eyes about The Division's setting, that allegedly there are "too many games set in New York", but there really aren't that many. We can make a list of NYC games, sure, but it's a drop in the ocean and mostly we'd be talking about games that feature New York in a small way. In the case of London, there are remarkably few games using it as a setting because it's so hard to use at all - certainly not a dime a dozen! To someone who hails from here, the idea that there are too many games about us feels kind of baffling.

Here's a list of all the ones Wikipedia could think of, and look how shaky this premise is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_video_games_set_in_London The largest block is racing games, and then you've got a lot of games that briefly feature a place that's allegedly London for the blink of an eye. The Getaway is one of the few that you can really call "a game set in London". [ETA - Notable absence - Focus's Sherlock Holmes games]

Farlander1991
09-21-2016, 04:54 PM
There really aren't many games set in London, though. It's like everyone rolled their eyes about The Division's setting, that allegedly there are "too many games set in New York", but there really aren't that many. We can make a list of NYC games, sure, but it's a drop in the ocean and mostly we'd be talking about games that feature New York in a small way. In the case of London, there are remarkably few games using it as a setting because it's so hard to use at all - certainly not a dime a dozen! To someone who hails from here, the idea that there are too many games about us feels kind of baffling.

Here's a list of all the ones Wikipedia could think of, and look how shaky this premise is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_video_games_set_in_London The largest block is racing games, and then you've got a lot of games that briefly feature a place that's allegedly London for the blink of an eye. The Getaway is one of the few that you can really call "a game set in London". [ETA - Notable absence - Focus's Sherlock Holmes games]

Similarly how when AC4 was announced, a lot of people went, 'ugh, ANOTHER pirate game?' when in reality there weren't that many pirate games at all, especially ship-based open-world ones, especially at the time of AC4's announcement and release.

American Revolution also had a 'ugh, really?' response, even though it was pretty much never used in an action/adventure setting, just in strategy/grand strategy games.

cawatrooper9
09-21-2016, 10:08 PM
There really aren't many games set in London, though. It's like everyone rolled their eyes about The Division's setting, that allegedly there are "too many games set in New York", but there really aren't that many. We can make a list of NYC games, sure, but it's a drop in the ocean and mostly we'd be talking about games that feature New York in a small way. In the case of London, there are remarkably few games using it as a setting because it's so hard to use at all - certainly not a dime a dozen! To someone who hails from here, the idea that there are too many games about us feels kind of baffling.

Here's a list of all the ones Wikipedia could think of, and look how shaky this premise is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_video_games_set_in_London The largest block is racing games, and then you've got a lot of games that briefly feature a place that's allegedly London for the blink of an eye. The Getaway is one of the few that you can really call "a game set in London". [ETA - Notable absence - Focus's Sherlock Holmes games]

That's fair, and maybe I'm projecting other media in there as well- London is an extremely popular setting in media, so it does have that familiarity. Now, the fact that, even if there aren't a ton of games that feature it, there are games that do, and that adds to the fatigue. And again, I think The Order had a big part to play, as well- a historical fiction, conspiracy-centered. cloak and dagger thriller set in Victorian London being released a few months before Syndicate just seems too coincidental.


Similarly how when AC4 was announced, a lot of people went, 'ugh, ANOTHER pirate game?' when in reality there weren't that many pirate games at all, especially ship-based open-world ones, especially at the time of AC4's announcement and release.

American Revolution also had a 'ugh, really?' response, even though it was pretty much never used in an action/adventure setting, just in strategy/grand strategy games.

That's true, and while I'm going to sound a little hypocritical here given my "other media" response to D.I.D., I think that part of the difference here is that we haven't had a lot of open world adventure games during the American Revolution or... well, there are a pretty good deal of open world pirate games, but Black Flag stands out in some aspects.

With the American Revolution, you're typically looking at RTS style games. With piracy, what comes to mind is a sort of "guys on a map" variant, like Sid Meiers game.

For the record, I liked London- it might be my favorite city in the series, actually. I'm just stating why I believe so many people did dislike it.

Fatal-Feit
09-22-2016, 01:31 PM
Speaking of other games and media, another reason why I didn't enjoy Syndicate's London very much was because of how different its atmosphere was, comparatively. It's probably not historically accurate, but I expected a game that took place primarily at night with thick fog and a huge sense of mystery, conspiracy, something The Order/Bloodborne-esque. What we got was a focus on gangs fights in the brim daylight and despite its variant architectures, kind of felt like a downscaled Paris. I didn't get the vibe the leaked images of Victory presented, and despite the game being fully aware of that, I really felt like what it delivered with its buddy cop style kind of wasted the settings.

Namikaze_17
09-22-2016, 03:59 PM
Speaking of other games and media, another reason why I didn't enjoy Syndicate's London very much was because of how different its atmosphere was, comparatively. It's probably not historically accurate, but I expected a game that took place primarily at night with thick fog and a huge sense of mystery, conspiracy, something The Order/Bloodborne-esque. What we got was a focus on gangs fights in the brim daylight and despite its variant architectures, kind of felt like a downscaled Paris. I didn't get the vibe the leaked images of Victory presented, and despite the game being fully aware of that, I really felt like what it delivered with its buddy cop style kind of wasted the settings.

This reminds me of visually disappointing the "night-time" is. I mean not only is it primarily day for the longest time, but when it does get dark, it only lasts for roughly twenty minutes or something while looking more dusk than anything else. The screenshots captured the (though probably inaccurate) moody, almost winter-like atmosphere perfectly with the skyline and illumination with the street lights. Syndicate's London by comparison seems like an entirely different game on its own.

But I suppose I understand since they wanted to deviate from the most common perception of VL to go along with the lighthearted tone of the game.

Pandassin
09-22-2016, 05:37 PM
Have to agree on the night time thing. The night in this game looks absolutely stunning and yet before you know it, it's daylight again. I don't have a problem with the daytime, it's just that I don't see why night has to be like 20% of the day/night cycle.

However I have to disagree that London gets boring really fast since there's still lots to do after the story, at least for a completionist like me there is.

Namikaze_17
09-22-2016, 07:17 PM
Have to agree on the night time thing. The night in this game looks absolutely stunning and yet before you know it, it's daylight again. I don't have a problem with the daytime, it's just that I don't see why night has to be like 20% of the day/night cycle.

However I have to disagree that London gets boring really fast since there's still lots to do after the story, at least for a completionist like me there is.

Maybe I should have been more specific with my title & opening post, but my argument is really about the lack of things you can do in London rather than the amount of content in the game. In that aspect, ACS is just fine.