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sgilewicz
01-28-2004, 09:14 AM
I've been flying the campaign for about a week and have noticed that takeoffs during storms are extremely hairy due to crosswinds. I am using a Logitech Strike Force 3D joystick and was wondering if anyone out there had some suggestions about how to take some stress out of the situation! Thanks.

sgilewicz
01-28-2004, 09:14 AM
I've been flying the campaign for about a week and have noticed that takeoffs during storms are extremely hairy due to crosswinds. I am using a Logitech Strike Force 3D joystick and was wondering if anyone out there had some suggestions about how to take some stress out of the situation! Thanks.

Cpt-Madcowz
01-28-2004, 09:23 AM
lots of rudder and practice

It's still hard for me but as long as I keep the nose straight I'm ok


/Mad

"When the hunter comes, the tiger runs with the dear"

blabla0001
01-28-2004, 09:26 AM
Throttle up slowly and apply rudder to stay on the runway.

Many times did I had to take off with full rudder input.

Woof603
01-28-2004, 09:31 AM
Start run with wing down into the wind, then apply opposite rudder as needed.

http://www.spaads.org/denmark/spsabre.JPG

|CoB|_Spectre
01-28-2004, 09:33 AM
Regarding FB flight in storm conditions, I hope BoB has an improved weather model. The crosswind as modeled in FB probably exceeds the demonstrated crosswind component capability of the aircraft. In short, if a crosswind is blowing strong enough to weathervane your airplane sitting on the runway, it's probably too strong to go flying. Crosswinds are most problematic during takeoff and landing due to runway alignment, obviously. Once an aircraft is aloft, it is affected by the movement of the air mass just as a boat moving across a river current and requires compensating heading to achieve the desired course (crab angle). In FB, though, the wind seems to exert a force on the aircraft that tries to roll the plane from level flight. I've done a bit of flying in light aircraft, which should be more susceptible to wind than heavier warbirds, and winds aloft do not exert a rolling force on the aircraft.

sgilewicz
01-28-2004, 11:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Woof603:
Start run with wing down into the wind, then apply opposite rudder as needed.

http://www.spaads.org/denmark/spsabre.JPG <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>When you refer to "wing down into the wind" do you mean aileron down into the wind? Thanks for the reply.

|CoB|_Spectre
01-28-2004, 02:27 PM
Yes, I'm sure he meant to keep aileron applied to the windward wing. This keeps the wind from getting under that wing and lifting it up. So, if the wind is from the right, apply right aileron to keep that wing in check while maintaining directional control with rudder.

Woof603
01-28-2004, 02:47 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ZG77_Spectre:
Yes, I'm sure he meant to keep aileron applied to the windward wing. This keeps the wind from getting under that wing and lifting it up. So, if the wind is from the right, apply right aileron to keep that wing in check while maintaining directional control with rudder.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're right...sorry I wasn't clearer. Wind from the right, then right aileron and left rudder and vice versa.

http://www.spaads.org/denmark/spsabre.JPG

jaspa2001
01-28-2004, 03:36 PM
What puzzled me about the turbulence was that there isn't a windsock at the end of the runway to give you a clue that the wind is gusting. If you're going to have wind effects in the sim I think you should have a windsock visible from the runway as well, most airfields have them.

Woof603
01-28-2004, 03:57 PM
Before you start your engine you'll see your propellor turning slowly with the wind.

http://www.spaads.org/denmark/spsabre.JPG

SKULLS Virga
01-28-2004, 03:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Woof603:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ZG77_Spectre:
Yes, I'm sure he meant to keep aileron applied to the windward wing. This keeps the wind from getting under that wing and lifting it up. So, if the wind is from the right, apply right aileron to keep that wing in check while maintaining directional control with rudder.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're right...sorry I wasn't clearer. Wind from the right, then right aileron and left rudder and vice versa.

http://www.spaads.org/denmark/spsabre.JPG <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Or to put it in a little different way - by adding aileron into the wind durning take off, approach and landing you are using some of the airplanes vertical lift to move the airplane side ways (horizontal lift). Using opposite rudder keeps the fuselage lined up with the runway. The wind moves the aircraft to the left, you use the horizontal component of lift to move the aircraft back to the right and use the rudder to keep the aircrafts centerline lined up with the runway. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

sgilewicz
01-28-2004, 04:44 PM
Thanks for the help. The aileron approach rreally makes sense. I just hope I can walk & chew gum well enough to coordinate the roll & yaw elements! Thanks again to all.