PDA

View Full Version : Well, I think Unity might be my favorite Assassin's Creed game!



flavorcountry19
07-27-2016, 02:03 AM
disclaimer i still think for nostalgia reasons the first AC takes the cake but based on all the improvments that have been made unity is my favorite to play.

Graphically its still a gem to look at and its 2 years old! The fabrics, lighting, hair all look amazing.

Free running is the best its ever been once you learn how to use the new system. Note: please dpnt allow the next assassin to be able to jump 5/6 feet up a wall while hanging onto a ledge! thats just impossible!

Stealth is a blast when you learn to use everything you have to not get spotted, and can take out an entire camp unseen.

co-op is a lot of fun when you get a good team together and do things as a unit and not apart! even then though its still fun to just be assassinating with someone else even if they aren't great!

customization is awesome!

and there is other stuff but thats about it!

Im not dissing anyone else's opinion on which they think is the best or anything like that! i love all AC but since unity gets so much flak i just want Ubisoft to know that i love it and think its up their with the best of the series!

Fatal-Feit
07-27-2016, 02:48 AM
I agree with everything here. :p

Graphically, Unity is by far still the most beautiful game I've played on PC. The lighting, the population, the textures, they're still unmatched. Physics and animations need polishing, but they're still great.

I agree about some of the jumps. They're inhumanly possible and I feel like navigation would have been fine without them. Luckily, you don't have to use them; just don't hold onto the parkour up button. Navigation is a lot more fun without them too.

So far, stealth in Unity have been the most evenly balanced in the franchise for me. While some mechanics could still use some polishing (and A LOT of explaining), I feel like the detection system is fair and the gameplay features gel together nicely once you understand them. Nothing is too OP or useless and that's why Unity's stealth has a lot of replay value for me.

MikeFNY
07-27-2016, 06:20 AM
Stealth is a blast when you learn to use everything you have to not get spotted, and can take out an entire camp unseen.

Absolutely :)

I uploaded some videos a few months ago, I agree that I've never enjoyed stealth in an AC game as I did with Unity:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KqV2X7pMMk

Sickboy7979
07-27-2016, 02:35 PM
I agree with everything you posted. I just recently completed Unity myself and thought it was fantastic. I'm in the middle of Syndicate right now, which is also good but, I think I lean towards Unity a bit more between the two. Not sure where I would rank Unity yet in comparison to the rest of the franchise. I'd have to think about that a bit. But, it would be pretty darn close to the top.

SixKeys
07-27-2016, 03:07 PM
Graphically its still a gem to look at and its 2 years old! The fabrics, lighting, hair all look amazing.


I agree it looks amazing, but you're saying "it's 2 years old!" like that's a lifetime. :p AC1 still looks great and that game is almost 10 years old. Not as great as Unity, naturally, I'm just saying it's hardly a miracle that a game that looked fantastic 2 years ago still does today.

Ureh
07-27-2016, 08:06 PM
Yeah it had a rocky start but also a smooth finish.

I'm with you guys and enjoying it for what it is.

flavorcountry19
07-28-2016, 01:57 AM
I agree it looks amazing, but you're saying "it's 2 years old!" like that's a lifetime. :p AC1 still looks great and that game is almost 10 years old. Not as great as Unity, naturally, I'm just saying it's hardly a miracle that a game that looked fantastic 2 years ago still does today.

Haha no I don't mean that like "wow it's ancient!" But compared to the games that have come out since! Uncharted, Arkham knight, the order(that may have actually been before) witcher 3.

It still can compete with these games even though it's older then them!

SixKeys
07-28-2016, 03:14 AM
Haha no I don't mean that like "wow it's ancient!" But compared to the games that have come out since! Uncharted, Arkham knight, the order(that may have actually been before) witcher 3.

It still can compete with these games even though it's older then them!

I honestly think it looks better than them. Unity has the best human character models I've ever seen in a game.

Fatal-Feit
07-28-2016, 04:22 AM
Haven't played Arkham Knight, but I've played UC4 and TW3 and Unity is definitely better looking than them. I think one advantage Unity has that TW3 don't is how well the graphics scale with DSR. While TW3 looks like a painting in 4K DSR, Unity looks like I've stepped into another reality. Absolutely stunning lighting system.

Farlander1991
07-28-2016, 06:28 AM
Haven't played Arkham Knight, but I've played UC4 and TW3 and Unity is definitely better looking than them.

While Unity is definitely the best-looking open-world game, I would argue the 'definitely' as it concerns the UC4 comparison in general. I mean, come on, it can't be that definitely, the game has SWEAT which I'm not sure how they did technically but you can see it slide down realistically in real-time renders (cutscenes in UC4 are also real-time renders). The detalization on characters is INSANE, and the fact that it's not an open-world game the detalization of environments is something that they were able to do really, really, REALLY freakin' good. So the 'definitely' is up to debate :p

Speaking of Unity, it's interesting to me to see what is particularly praised in it, mainly the mechanics, co-op missions, customization, since in one of the blog posts I'm writing about AC and how to deliver cohesive experience, Unity is an example of a very disconnected and incoherent one, and it's a very good example precisely because its elements separately are insanely good, the mechanics, the mission design, the co-op, but when it's all put together it doesn't gel and fails to provide a connected, consistent experience for the player.

Fatal-Feit
07-28-2016, 08:35 AM
While Unity is definitely the best-looking open-world game, I would argue the 'definitely' as it concerns the UC4 comparison in general. I mean, come on, it can't be that definitely, the game has SWEAT which I'm not sure how they did technically but you can see it slide down realistically in real-time renders (cutscenes in UC4 are also real-time renders). The detalization on characters is INSANE, and the fact that it's not an open-world game the detalization of environments is something that they were able to do really, really, REALLY freakin' good. So the 'definitely' is up to debate :p

I don't want to use higher resolution and frame rate as an argument here, but it's another thing worth keeping in mind when also comparing the visuals.

The technology behind UC4 is incredible, but because it's a linear experience that's mostly scripted by design, I'd be disappointed if the visuals weren't gorgeous (******* Scotland levels!). That said, I still find Unity to be a level ahead. Even as an open-world game that doesn't have its environments and characters detailed to a tee (bunch of weird environmental structuring such as missing doors in hallways, etc) the visuals have more ongoing than in UC4, which clearly limits itself due to performance limitations. It's possible to compare them in detail, from textures and geometry to physics, but Unity has the edge in its ambitions as an open world experience with its incredible amount of onscreen NPCs and lighting, to name a few.

Personally, the only thing I really took away from UC4's visuals was the supreme animation work (beautiful take-down animations and foliage) and how insanely clean they kept the visuals for the platform; strong motion blur, great temporal AA solution, and solid frame rate. This isn't to say that its graphics aren't amazing, it's just that I think I'm at a point where linear experiences like it (UC4's pseudo open level design isn't really that open) don't really wow me anymore, as I feel like its visuals are more disingenuous than anything. Like when exploring Madagascar, I actually felt like it was underwhelming and barren (referring to foliage and draw distance) and the moments of driving under a river fall to wipe the dirt off or seeing lemurs run by at a cliff didn't really phase me, as they're just scripted segments. Unity's linear, scripted segments like the prologue and its Rift missions don't really do it for me either.


Speaking of Unity, it's interesting to me to see what is particularly praised in it, mainly the mechanics, co-op missions, customization, since in one of the blog posts I'm writing about AC and how to deliver cohesive experience, Unity is an example of a very disconnected and incoherent one, and it's a very good example precisely because its elements separately are insanely good, the mechanics, the mission design, the co-op, but when it's all put together it doesn't gel and fails to provide a connected, consistent experience for the player.

If you don't mind spoiling some bits, could you explain some of your reasons for that?

Farlander1991
07-28-2016, 09:02 AM
If you don't mind spoiling some bits, could you explain some of your reasons for that?

In short, because every part of the game is its own thing.
Main narrative? Arno's personal story to the point that French Revolution is on such a far backdrop that you go through events like September Massacres without any context. It's more subtle and nuanced I think than people tend to give it credit, but it just stands on its own if you look at Unity as a whole.
Paris stories? A collection of pretty much solely French Revolution-related side missions with tons of side historical characters you see once and don't care about. Outside from a few missions with Napoleon and De Sade - no connecting pieces to the main narrative, and there's no real establishment between what Arno is doing in main narrative and what he's doing in side.
Co-op missions? They're very cool, but it's another separate section that even absolutely contradicts the main narrative. Most of its missions happen during the time period when Arno was exiled and out of Paris (though in one mission that happens during this period, a captured Assassin mentions Arno by name!)
Co-op heists? Another its own thing that's more of an Animus training program than anything.
Time Anomalies? Another Animus thing unconnected to the rest of the game at all with the exception of being set in Paris.
The whole Cafe Theater loop where the recruit Arno is just given a home base because that's what Assassin's Creed games have.

Again, all those things are pretty cool on their own, but when they're all pieced together, it's not a carefully constructed puzzle like ACB or AC4, it's just a bunch of objects thrown into a basket.

HDinHB
07-28-2016, 09:56 AM
Speaking of Unity, it's interesting to me to see what is particularly praised in it, mainly the mechanics, co-op missions, customization, since in one of the blog posts I'm writing about AC and how to deliver cohesive experience, Unity is an example of a very disconnected and incoherent one, and it's a very good example precisely because its elements separately are insanely good, the mechanics, the mission design, the co-op, but when it's all put together it doesn't gel and fails to provide a connected, consistent experience for the player.

That's a good way of explaining it. I had a lot of fun playing Unity, and it did some things well, other things not so well, and some things poorly, and some things they shouldn't have done. In the end, the whole is less than the sum of its parts.

Fatal-Feit
07-28-2016, 10:20 AM
In short, because every part of the game is its own thing.
Main narrative? Arno's personal story to the point that French Revolution is on such a far backdrop that you go through events like September Massacres without any context. It's more subtle and nuanced I think than people tend to give it credit, but it just stands on its own if you look at Unity as a whole.
Paris stories? A collection of pretty much solely French Revolution-related side missions with tons of side historical characters you see once and don't care about. Outside from a few missions with Napoleon and De Sade - no connecting pieces to the main narrative, and there's no real establishment between what Arno is doing in main narrative and what he's doing in side.
Co-op missions? They're very cool, but it's another separate section that even absolutely contradicts the main narrative. Most of its missions happen during the time period when Arno was exiled and out of Paris (though in one mission that happens during this period, a captured Assassin mentions Arno by name!)
Co-op heists? Another its own thing that's more of an Animus training program than anything.
Time Anomalies? Another Animus thing unconnected to the rest of the game at all with the exception of being set in Paris.
The whole Cafe Theater loop where the recruit Arno is just given a home base because that's what Assassin's Creed games have.

Again, all those things are pretty cool on their own, but when they're all pieced together, it's not a carefully constructed puzzle like ACB or AC4, it's just a bunch of objects thrown into a basket.

Thanks for the summary. I have to agree with you with all of that, but I think the issue mainly lies in the disjointed narrative. What are your opinions on how they glue together from a gameplay perspective?

Farlander1991
07-28-2016, 11:54 AM
Thanks for the summary. I have to agree with you with all of that, but I think the issue mainly lies in the disjointed narrative. What are your opinions on how they glue together from a gameplay perspective?

Well, you can't put all the fault just on the narrative, 'oh it's the narrative that didn't tie this all up together nicely', I believe that's just not the right way to look at it. In an interactive narrative medium, you can't except the gameplay systems do whatever they want and then just have the narrative tie it all up together. If you do that you get, well, Unity. Narrative and gameplay systems/meta-game have to play off each other, and depending on what you're doing, there should be some gameplay related things that would be better to cut or not implement (I provided some examples in my post related to ACR), or maybe some specific narrative things that you have to do, but it's both sides that have to make the effort.

If you look at it purely systemically, for the most part Unity makes sense. But players, for the most part, they don't look at systems, they don't play Unity and go 'oh look how when I capture this point my income increases and that benefits my economy', they look at experience the game provides.

If a player completes a co-op mission with his friends while he controls Arno completing a mission with HIS friends with each of whom he has a relationship and each has a name, then the player is invested both ways and it enhances the experience, and it enhances the main narrative, and everything. If a player completes a co-op mission with his friends while he controls Arno completing a mission with some random dudes, it's not bad experience, but it's just to have fun with friends since missions are still well-designed. Know what I mean? Like, when we've played Unity together, the only thing that still has really stuck in my mind (outside of us talking), was how I kept getting stuck beneath moveable surfaces and not able to move anymore. I'm sure we've had fun talking and completing the missions, but there was nothing that stayed with me like, for example, the moment from ACB when I climbed Castel Sant'Angelo and commanded my Assassins to take care of guards on the walls. Yes, the systems in ACB aren't perfect, but they and the narrative work together to provide an experience (and I've already wrote a blog post about that as well :D )

In comparison, those couple times we've played the Division together (I do need at some point to get back to it, haven't played for months), I still remember how we were searching for infected items that can help find a cure, while those flamethrower guys were trying to burn everything including us. The Division has flaws, but it works better than Unity at creating meaningful experiences that stay with you. One of the reasons why random people work better in Division than in Unity, btw, is because our characters are all blank slates. It's essentially us with other people, rather than us through an avatar with his own character and desires and reasons. But that's another topic.

Anyway, yeah. That was a bit rambly I suppose, sorry about that, but hopefully the point I'm trying to make is understandable :)

Fatal-Feit
07-28-2016, 09:51 PM
Well, you can't put all the fault just on the narrative, 'oh it's the narrative that didn't tie this all up together nicely', I believe that's just not the right way to look at it.[/


Oh, I'm not. You didn't really speak about the gameplay in your last post and that's why I also asked. :p


In an interactive narrative medium, you can't except the gameplay systems do whatever they want and then just have the narrative tie it all up together. If you do that you get, well, Unity. Narrative and gameplay systems/meta-game have to play off each other, and depending on what you're doing, there should be some gameplay related things that would be better to cut or not implement (I provided some examples in my post related to ACR), or maybe some specific narrative things that you have to do, but it's both sides that have to make the effort.

If you look at it purely systemically, for the most part Unity makes sense. But players, for the most part, they don't look at systems, they don't play Unity and go 'oh look how when I capture this point my income increases and that benefits my economy', they look at experience the game provides.

If a player completes a co-op mission with his friends while he controls Arno completing a mission with HIS friends with each of whom he has a relationship and each has a name, then the player is invested both ways and it enhances the experience, and it enhances the main narrative, and everything. If a player completes a co-op mission with his friends while he controls Arno completing a mission with some random dudes, it's not bad experience, but it's just to have fun with friends since missions are still well-designed. Know what I mean? Like, when we've played Unity together, the only thing that still has really stuck in my mind (outside of us talking), was how I kept getting stuck beneath moveable surfaces and not able to move anymore. I'm sure we've had fun talking and completing the missions, but there was nothing that stayed with me like, for example, the moment from ACB when I climbed Castel Sant'Angelo and commanded my Assassins to take care of guards on the walls. Yes, the systems in ACB aren't perfect, but they and the narrative work together to provide an experience (and I've already wrote a blog post about that as well :D )

In comparison, those couple times we've played the Division together (I do need at some point to get back to it, haven't played for months), I still remember how we were searching for infected items that can help find a cure, while those flamethrower guys were trying to burn everything including us. The Division has flaws, but it works better than Unity at creating meaningful experiences that stay with you. One of the reasons why random people work better in Division than in Unity, btw, is because our characters are all blank slates. It's essentially us with other people, rather than us through an avatar with his own character and desires and reasons. But that's another topic.

Anyway, yeah. That was a bit rambly I suppose, sorry about that, but hopefully the point I'm trying to make is understandable :)

No problem, I couldn't agree more with you point and I've even spoken about this before in some calls (not sure if any of them were with you or not) and, IIRC, on the forums regarding the CO-OP. The whole seamless connectivity thing in Unity creates for a half-baked experience from both a gameplay and narrative pov. Except for wanting to try it out a few times or to play with friends, there's really nothing that ties players to it. The loot rewards, the Creed points, you don't get anymore bonuses from having a CO-OP partner. And the game doesn't really teach players how to CO-OP together, so early attempts are often chaotic. Literally, the only benefit was the Club feature, but that in itself was flawed for what they attempted.

One of my ideas was that Unity may have been a better experience if it had been split up into two parts like the previous games; no big new assets really needed, just a separate Story Mode for SP/offline and Unity Mode for CO-OP/online. They're both self-explanatory, but for the sake of hearing your opinion on this if you haven't already given one in the past:

Story Mode would be the main sequences, side missions that focuses on the side characters from the story and some random missions that Arno spoke in, including Nostradamus Enigmas (no Murder Mysteries; only the ones in the main sequences), chest collectibles (only the offline ones), customization is primarily based on Arno's various main robes and all the Legacy Outfits, and I think that's it. Of course, there would be the problem of the main campaign being a drastically scaled down version of itself and possibly the shortest in the series, feeling like an advertisement for Unity Mode, but I feel like a smaller, more cohesive and less contradicting experience would be more enjoyable than a bloated one. Also a minor detail, but the name above the health bar would say Arno Victor Dorian like in the Gamescom Demo.

Unity Mode doesn't need a full-fledged character customization for the head like in The Division, but it could at least allow players to choose between the other few face models they've created like in Identity to stick with, including choosing from one of many Handmade Sets to start with (Arno's sets and the Legacy Outfits could be available later; possibly rewards from completing free-roam/CO-OP missions or accomplishing things in Story Mode). I think already, there would be this connected feeling between the player and their Unity Mode character like in The Division, being able to choose a face, start with a set that adheres to their play style, and have their Ubisoft tag instead of Arno's full name. Separating this mode is also a good way to quickly get started in Unity for those people who are impatient and don't want to play through sequences to CO-OP with their friends. As for the gameplay itself, while Unity Mode could be advertised as an online experience, it could be played offline, with the downside being the loss of obviously the CO-OP feature, online chests, etc. Everything else that I didn't mention in Story Mode would be present in Unity Mode as well. It may also help eliminate a lot of the pacing issues, clashing side content, and confusing things like Arno taking his time to search for murderers where it's actually ourselves who wants to do it because the game has it. This of course, doesn't actually fix the issue I spoke about earlier, regarding having a good reason to do CO-OP, but it does give the experience more impact.

Ureh
07-29-2016, 05:45 AM
Unity Mode doesn't need a full-fledged character customization for the head like in The Division, but it could at least allow players to choose between the other few face models they've created like in Identity to stick with, including choosing from one of many Handmade Sets to start with (Arno's sets and the Legacy Outfits could be available later; possibly rewards from completing free-roam/CO-OP missions or accomplishing things in Story Mode). I think already, there would be this connected feeling between the player and their Unity Mode character like in The Division, being able to choose a face, start with a set that adheres to their play style, and have their Ubisoft tag instead of Arno's full name. Separating this mode is also a good way to quickly get started in Unity for those people who are impatient and don't want to play through sequences to CO-OP with their friends. As for the gameplay itself, while Unity Mode could be advertised as an online experience, it could be played offline, with the downside being the loss of obviously the CO-OP feature, online chests, etc. Everything else that I didn't mention in Story Mode would be present in Unity Mode as well. It may also help eliminate a lot of the pacing issues, clashing side content, and confusing things like Arno taking his time to search for murderers where it's actually ourselves who wants to do it because the game has it. This of course, doesn't actually fix the issue I spoke about earlier, regarding having a good reason to do CO-OP, but it does give the experience more impact.

As long as the online chests don't hold anything back, like what the Initiates chest originally did, then I'm okay with them.

I got a few extra ideas for customisable faces. You know how the face would disappear leaving only the eyes and teeth? What about the players that actually want that?! Or how about no facial features at all... no eyes, teeth, just a completely invisible/transparent person wearing clothes. And how about a face that is constantly shrouded in darkness (that way we can only see the bottom of the nose, lips, chin, etc) similar to the cover arts? Maybe even an "infinite" abyss face like this:

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/diablo/images/b/b2/Itherael_Portrait.png/revision/latest?cb=20121125113951

Fatal-Feit
07-29-2016, 08:21 AM
As long as the online chests don't hold anything back, like what the Initiates chest originally did, then I'm okay with them.

I was referring to the Initiates chest because they existed. What I was getting at is that separating the game into two modes (like GTAV) could have possibly improved the experience tremendously without needing to provide any new assets and other changes.


I got a few extra ideas for customisable faces. You know how the face would disappear leaving only the eyes and teeth? What about the players that actually want that?! Or how about no facial features at all... no eyes, teeth, just a completely invisible/transparent person wearing clothes. And how about a face that is constantly shrouded in darkness (that way we can only see the bottom of the nose, lips, chin, etc) similar to the cover arts? Maybe even an "infinite" abyss face like this:

http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/diablo/images/b/b2/Itherael_Portrait.png/revision/latest?cb=20121125113951

I like that idea, but I think it would limit the designs because a lot of the hoods don't actually cover the entire frontal face like Altair's hood. Some of them are pretty light and exposes the bottom half of the face. Although, the quest givers in the Brotherhood do have a mask for that, so perhaps it could have been done.

Farlander1991
07-29-2016, 08:55 AM
To be honest, even though I did say everything I said and still believe it to be true, I do think that what Unity has with co-op is better than if co-op was a separate mode. If there's a choice between 1 progression system and an ability to jump into a co-op session from whenever you're playing single-player all in the same open-world, and two different modes with two progression systems, I would choose the first one. Not to mention, the player base doesn't get diluted, i.e. people playing SP and people playing co-op are essentially the same people, while two modes would provide two different player bases for content that's gameplay-wise and mechanically is the same. Let's not forget that AC MP from previous games is fundamentally different to how AC SP works, and this is not the case with ACU.

LoyalACFan
07-29-2016, 12:35 PM
I honestly think it looks better than them. Unity has the best human character models I've ever seen in a game.

Really? IMHO the character models were the least visually impressive part of Unity. Not that they looked bad or anything (they're great) but the real star was the environment. Almost photorealistic in a lot of places.

But to the OP... I agree, Unity was a huge step forward in a lot of areas. It isn't my favorite, but it's still damned impressive. Such a shame it had such a rocky launch; it kind of stuck the game with a shoddy reputation it doesn't really deserve. Not that there aren't big problems with the game, but still.

cawatrooper9
07-29-2016, 02:58 PM
Oh yeah, Unity took the criticisms of historical tourism from previous games and overcorrected straight past oncoming traffic and into a ditch.

I love the idea of a personal story set across the backdrop of history, I really do- the problem was that the history was poorly developed, and the personal story didn't actually fare much better. Everything just felt really paper thin.

SixKeys
07-29-2016, 07:44 PM
Oh yeah, Unity took the criticisms of historical tourism from previous games and overcorrected straight past oncoming traffic and into a ditch.

I love the idea of a personal story set across the backdrop of history, I really do- the problem was that the history was poorly developed, and the personal story didn't actually fare much better. Everything just felt really paper thin.

I weep for what could have been. I really hope someday we'll get our Red Violin AC. :(

D.I.D.
07-29-2016, 07:49 PM
Oh yeah, Unity took the criticisms of historical tourism from previous games and overcorrected straight past oncoming traffic and into a ditch.

I love the idea of a personal story set across the backdrop of history, I really do- the problem was that the history was poorly developed, and the personal story didn't actually fare much better. Everything just felt really paper thin.

Agreed. I do love Unity, my favourite after Syndicate, but I wish they'd got the history right. As you say, I hope they haven't abandoned the idea of a personal story with the history as a backdrop. Could be really great once they get it right.

On the character models, I was disappointed that Unity ignored the physical characteristics of the real people involved. AC has always been loose about making the characters fit their portraits, which is understandable; we know many portrait artists were not accurate, and worked to fashions in portraiture more often than pure accuracy. However, you can compare portraits and ignore some artists' representations and add more weight to others (for example, it's noticeable that some artists paint everyone the same, or were trying to ape another hot artist of the say). The most frustrating thing about Unity is that we have actual casts of so many of the major figures' faces in their death masks, so it's beyond question what they looked like.

If they're going to go to such lengths to make the streets as accurate as possible, why not give us the famous people too?

Ureh
07-29-2016, 07:55 PM
Paris stories? A collection of pretty much solely French Revolution-related side missions with tons of side historical characters you see once and don't care about. Outside from a few missions with Napoleon and De Sade - no connecting pieces to the main narrative, and there's no real establishment between what Arno is doing in .

Sometimes I got the feeling that the characters in the Paris Stories were meant to be forgettable, in a "good" way. On one hand it is a bit weird that most of the paris story characters are actual historical figures or a variation/fiction of real people, so it can be a bit jarring (couldn't think of a better word) to some players when they keep meeting all these guys that they might've heard/read about. But on the other hand... did the devs intend for them to be forgettable because during Arno's time, these historical characters were more normal, everyday folk? Not sure if that makes sense... but what I'm saying is, they weren't as famous then as they are remembered now. Might not apply to all of the characters since some of them probably were more notable back then than now. And it doesn't change the fact that most of them are historical figs now, but maybe we were meant to see them from Arno's pov. "Hey, we don't know each other very well, but I heard that you need help. Here's your request. Bye."

The only main story connection that I could really attribute to the Paris Stories - aside from De Sade, Napoleon... and maybe Mericourt gets a bit of credit too - is that Arno loves helping people. Doesn't matter if he knows them or not, or their affiliations... if he hears that someone is in need help then he'll do it. Arno helps others because he was powerless to help himself. I'm probably looking at it wrongly but that's how I saw these things.


Really? IMHO the character models were the least visually impressive part of Unity. Not that they looked bad or anything (they're great) but the real star was the environment. Almost photorealistic in a lot of places.

I haven't played a lot of current-gen open world games, only Infamous Second Son, Syndicate, and Unity so far. Compared to the first two games, ACU's npc models looked the best and most varied (I think there might be at least 10 facial variants per gender.). Add that with all the npcs on screen, the facial emotions, emotes, interactions, the lighting and shadows bouncing off their costumes... amazing. Surprisingly, Infamous' npc models were... well, let's just say they made me think that they set them to "near low graphics settings". Maybe the Infamous series never known for their npcs but I was (maybe unreasonably) expecting more from a ps4-exclusive.

SixKeys
07-29-2016, 08:39 PM
As you say, I hope they haven't abandoned the idea of a personal story with the history as a backdrop. Could be really great once they get it right.

That was called Black Flag. :p

Farlander1991
07-29-2016, 09:10 PM
Sometimes I got the feeling that the characters in the Paris Stories were meant to be forgettable, in a "good" way. On one hand it is a bit weird that most of the paris story characters are actual historical figures or a variation/fiction of real people, so it can be a bit jarring (couldn't think of a better word) to some players when they keep meeting all these guys that they might've heard/read about. But on the other hand... did the devs intend for them to be forgettable because during Arno's time, these historical characters were more normal, everyday folk? Not sure if that makes sense... but what I'm saying is, they weren't as famous then as they are remembered now. Might not apply to all of the characters since some of them probably were more notable back then than now. And it doesn't change the fact that most of them are historical figs now, but maybe we were meant to see them from Arno's pov. "Hey, we don't know each other very well, but I heard that you need help. Here's your request. Bye."

The only main story connection that I could really attribute to the Paris Stories - aside from De Sade, Napoleon... and maybe Mericourt gets a bit of credit too - is that Arno loves helping people. Doesn't matter if he knows them or not, or their affiliations... if he hears that someone is in need help then he'll do it. Arno helps others because he was powerless to help himself. I'm probably looking at it wrongly but that's how I saw these things.

It's curious that you mention all this, because the most memorable character for me out of all Paris Stories was precisely a non-historical everyday character who I'm not even sure had a name. It was that girl who was training at a barn because her home was taken away from her. I remember how Arno when approached her was like, 'uuuh, what is that?', and she explained everything, and he helped train her, and then they went and returned the home and then the girl got reminiscent of all the memories she had of that place. It was very touching and human, and very Arno so to speak, in line to what he wanted to do when he saw a person's leg being chopped off in the main story, for example.

But most Paris Stories aren't like that. It's 'hur-dur-dur Crown Jewels trivia trivia trivia', 'hur-dur-dur, some pages, trivia trivia trivia', and then there was a woman who claimed she was psychic and knew who's gonna kill her so we went around with her and killed everyone she pointed at? That particular one was very baffling, it's like, 'wtf, how do you believe her?!' I don't think she turned on us or was proved to be a fraud, but honestly that was some very weird ****. So the problem is not even with the 'everyday' factor of the historical characters at the time, but because they were crammed in for the sake of being crammed in and some mission attached to them based on some historical trivia.

And don't get me wrong, I don't think I had issues with the mechanical design of those levels, i.e. placement of objects, enemies, stuff like that, but still, I did have a problem with the overall experience they provided, because most of them left a very mixed taste due to these forced historical characters and whatnot. Also, the love triangle between Napoleon and whoever the two other people were was the worst love story ever.


That was called Black Flag. http://static5.cdn.ubi.com/u/ubiforums/20130918.419/images/smilies/tongue.png

It's curious how many people (in general, not pointing to anybody in particular here) think that Black Flag doesn't have a lot of history in it, because I think it's actually the one that's got the most history weaved in into it's main storyline out of every main game, and I think the fact that most people who play it (and didn't study pirate history of that time era and place beforehand) don't notice it is a testament to just how well it was done. Big reason for that I guess was the fact that half of the history comes from historical account of the pirates that we meet in the game, and that's all very personal and human.

And it's funny cause I think I was one of the few people (the other ones probably being those who studied pirate history as well before playing BF) who got so excited when Torres after captuing us in Sequence 2 said 'send him to Seville with the treasure fleet', and I was like, 'wait... it's 1715... treasure fleet... do you mean we're gonna be in the midst of the 1715 hurricane storm that destroyed the whole fleet?' and we were, and we escaped with Jackdaw from it and it was awesome. I mean, generally it's just an awesome moment and an awesome way to get our ship and open up the world, but it's also a historical event. And there's a bunch of historical moments in lots of other sequences as well.

And even little details like Roberts' body being thrown off from his ship after he died amidst a battle on the coast of Africa. That's what actually happened (well, by historical accounts at the least, but Roberts' body was never found), and AC4 connected it with the Templar/Sage thing that Templars shouldn't find the body. It's really cool.

cawatrooper9
07-29-2016, 10:51 PM
That was called Black Flag. :p

Pretty much.

Black Flag was still a teeny bit heavy on the historical side, but man, they came as close to doing it right as anyone.

Ureh
07-30-2016, 08:54 PM
And don't get me wrong, I don't think I had issues with the mechanical design of those levels, i.e. placement of objects, enemies, stuff like that, but still, I did have a problem with the overall experience they provided, because most of them left a very mixed taste due to these forced historical characters and whatnot. Also, the love triangle between Napoleon and whoever the two other people were was the worst love story ever.
.

Josephine and Desire.

I watched the movies.

Farlander1991
07-30-2016, 09:35 PM
Josephine and Desire.

I watched the movies.

Well, Josephine I know, that questline didn't involve her (though she was mentioned), the second person is that schmuck who wanted Desire and we acted as a weird wingman or something.

D.I.D.
07-30-2016, 11:13 PM
That was called Black Flag. :p

:D Touché

(Although, good though it was, two of the major players in that personal story were barely seen! The idea of a personal story independent of the historical setting is still a goal up for grabs, imo)

siknorm77
08-05-2016, 08:01 PM
Dude!! You hit the nail on the head! I play this game everyday even though I beat it months ago! It's visually stunning, game-play is fluid and it's a ton of fun! I only wish that they made it to where I could play it over again w/o having to delete my current progress and lose everything that I have attained, but other than that, I LOVE it!! Ubisoft really outdid themselves with this one.

Another thing, I think that in this day and age people take for granted how good the graphics are in game. The graphics and detailed in this game are unparalleled. There are hundreds of people walking around, talking, and reacting to you all over the game. There is a ton of detail in them and they are very life-like. And the buildings!!!! They are so detailed and beautiful!! I can only hope that the next AC will be similar in detail and game play. I LOVE THIS GAME!!!

crash_1232015
08-06-2016, 06:38 PM
Graphics and game-play in Unity fantasic, soundtrack and storyline could have been better though