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View Full Version : I wonder what was empty weight of Fw190A3/A4



falco_cz
09-02-2004, 04:43 AM
I know that Fw190s were quite heavy, well amrored figters. In the book. M.Murawski in his book "Aircraft of Luftwaffe" states that Fw109A3 empty weight is 2875 kg. Is it true? It seems to be very light to me.

falco_cz
09-02-2004, 04:43 AM
I know that Fw190s were quite heavy, well amrored figters. In the book. M.Murawski in his book "Aircraft of Luftwaffe" states that Fw109A3 empty weight is 2875 kg. Is it true? It seems to be very light to me.

EFG_Zeb
09-02-2004, 04:55 AM
FW 190 A3 empty weight is given at 2899.8 kg (6393 lbs). Source : "FW 190 In Action" - Squadron/Signal

A4 is basically same weight as A3 provided no ETC 501 bombrack.

Now, the A8 is much heavier given at 3470.9 kg (7652 lbs). Same source.

"See, Decide, Attack, Reverse or Coffee Break" E.H.

hop2002
09-02-2004, 05:04 AM
The British evaluation of their first captured 190 A3 gives empty weight as 2970 kg, but that doesn't include weapons or radio. Loaded weight, with weapons, ammo, pilot and fuel, but no external stores, is given as 3890 kg.

k5054
09-02-2004, 05:43 AM
you'd think empty was empty, but no, each nation has different standards for the various weights. To me, you should leave out fuel, oil, coolant, pilot and ammo but leave the radios and guns in. However different countries varied, and the standards also changed over time, eg in 1935 it might be quite easy to remove the externally mounted guns and the radio might be optional. By 1945 the guns could not be easily removed and the radios are a standard fit. A/C are usually weighed and balanced empty (this is a periodic requirement) according to an official definition of what empty is, and that usually denotes a state where no optional stuff is fitted. Then when you do a mod or add a field kit you make a specified alteration to the weight/balance data.
The pilot then has the data he needs to do a weight/balance with his planned bomb/fuel/pax load. Which he'll do every flight. Yeah, right.

This almost useless information brought to you by someone who used to be an aircraft mechanic, oonce upon a time.