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View Full Version : Origins of the salute . . .



choxaway
09-02-2004, 03:08 AM
Just a bit of useless trivia for everyone, but I was watching Battlefield Britain on the box last week and apparently the commander of the troops would ride up and down the lines in his suit of armour, shouting encouragement before battle.
In order to do this he had to lift his visor in order to be heard clearly. Holding the reins in his left hand, he's use his right to raise the visor - this action apparently led to the adoption of the right handed salute used in later years.
Well, something new every day . . .


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choxaway
09-02-2004, 03:08 AM
Just a bit of useless trivia for everyone, but I was watching Battlefield Britain on the box last week and apparently the commander of the troops would ride up and down the lines in his suit of armour, shouting encouragement before battle.
In order to do this he had to lift his visor in order to be heard clearly. Holding the reins in his left hand, he's use his right to raise the visor - this action apparently led to the adoption of the right handed salute used in later years.
Well, something new every day . . .


http://img12.photobucket.com/albums/v30/choxaway/IL2FB/6c05075b.gif

ELEM
09-02-2004, 03:25 AM
http://www.defence.gov.au/army/traditions/documents/OriginsofSaluting.htm

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Huckebein_UK
09-02-2004, 03:31 AM
Very interestin' y'all. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

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ploughman
09-02-2004, 05:54 AM
What about...you know...the "other" salute?

Rola.
09-02-2004, 06:24 AM
Just in case you wondered, the Polish salute (only with index and middle fingers) has its roots in Kosciuszko's oath from XVIIIc.


If by the "other" salute you mean the way Nazis greeted themselves, then the answer is: a gesture dating back to Roman Empire. Ever seen guys saying "Ave Caesar!" in a movie?



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[This message was edited by Skibicki on Thu September 02 2004 at 06:18 AM.]

JG54_Arnie
09-02-2004, 08:22 AM
and what about the S! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

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ploughman
09-02-2004, 08:30 AM
Well yeah, I've seen the films. But did it come via the Italians and their fascist revival of all things Roman or via a different root? The imagery and symbolism of fascism is very Roman, even though the Germans were never romanised in the way that that other parts of Europe were. But then much of the state orientated muscular imagery of the 1930s looks pretty Roman revival by todays standards (look at the designs on the Hoover Dam).

Friendly_flyer
09-02-2004, 08:44 AM
Any country aspiring to be an empire seems to adopt some Roman symbols. That was the case with the Emp├┬*re style of the Napoleon era, the rather Roman look of Victorian buildings in UK, and US official buildings from the late 19th/early 20th century. British Museum could easily have passed as the Senate in Rome. The Lincoln Memorial in Washington is in essence a Roman temple. It seems after 1500 years after the fall of Rome, their symbols are still associated with might.

The Germans too had their share of the Roman imagerie. The eagle, the standards, the salute, its all something that old Augustus, Claudius or Trajan would have recognised.

Fly friendly!

Petter B├┬Şckman
Norway

PraetorHonoris
09-02-2004, 09:26 AM
Germany did not share the insignias, but inherited them!

You must not forget that Carolus Magnus/Charlemagne/Karl der Gro├če (however you want to call him) was crowned by Leo III. and became Augustus Imperator (August Emperor). He called his empire Roman Empire, although actually only a small part of it was Roman.
When his empire broke apart, the eastern part of it (basicly German) took over the Imperial honor.
Frederick Barbarossa renamed it later into Holy Empire and Frederick II. into Holy Roman Empire.
At the beginning of the 16th century, after Italies cities and Switzerland had left this empire, it was called: Holy Roman Empire of German Nation.
This Empire lastet until 1806 (1000 years), Hitler used to call it I. Empire...

The eagle, as it is used in Germany as a state symbol, derives from the medieval German interpretation of the Roman eagle, but they are quite different.

Concerning the military saltut, I find it very interessting that different nations have similar ways to salute, which slightly differ from each other nevertheless.

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TheGozr
09-02-2004, 03:12 PM
I hope you don't say that Charlemagne was German right..? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif that would be a great mistake..

-GOZR
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