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View Full Version : WWI xmas joy in the trenches



arcadeace
12-22-2003, 07:26 AM
In the early morning hours of December 25, a thick mist settled around them.
It was hard to see from one side of "No Man's Land" to the other. Suddenly a
chorus of song broke the silence of the morning, and drifted up from the German
trenches across the way. The startled allies were amazed to discover when
they peeked their heads up to look, that the Germans had erected dozens of
Christmas trees in their trenches, and had even decorated them. They listened
in silence as the Germans sang "Silent Night." Stille nacht, heilige nacht?


When the voices concluded and echoed away, applause rang out from the allies.
The German singing had been lovely. The allies began a song of their own, and on
through the night the soldiers from either side of the battlefield sang together.

When dawn broke, the Germans called out to the allies, "Come over!" The allies
responded, "You first!" and tentatively, officers from either side walked out
over "No Man's Land," to greet each other. A ceasefire was called, and soldiers
from both sides rose out of their trenches to meet these people whom they had
just been trying to kill. Some of the people could communicate with words, but
others who did not know the other side's language made themselves understood
as they gave each other gifts of cigarettes, clothing and food. They shared
photographs of their families, and called each other "friend" for the rest of the
day. A football game started and soon the war was converted into a peaceful game. To this day no one knows who won the game, but it really didn't matter. They built bonfires which glowed well into the night.

Finally the long dreaded moment had come- time for each side to return to their
trenches. The soldiers said goodbye to their new friends, and sank down into
their muddy holes. With a heavy heart, the firing began again, and the war
continued for four more years.

This has been cut and pasted from articles

arcadeace
12-22-2003, 07:26 AM
In the early morning hours of December 25, a thick mist settled around them.
It was hard to see from one side of "No Man's Land" to the other. Suddenly a
chorus of song broke the silence of the morning, and drifted up from the German
trenches across the way. The startled allies were amazed to discover when
they peeked their heads up to look, that the Germans had erected dozens of
Christmas trees in their trenches, and had even decorated them. They listened
in silence as the Germans sang "Silent Night." Stille nacht, heilige nacht?


When the voices concluded and echoed away, applause rang out from the allies.
The German singing had been lovely. The allies began a song of their own, and on
through the night the soldiers from either side of the battlefield sang together.

When dawn broke, the Germans called out to the allies, "Come over!" The allies
responded, "You first!" and tentatively, officers from either side walked out
over "No Man's Land," to greet each other. A ceasefire was called, and soldiers
from both sides rose out of their trenches to meet these people whom they had
just been trying to kill. Some of the people could communicate with words, but
others who did not know the other side's language made themselves understood
as they gave each other gifts of cigarettes, clothing and food. They shared
photographs of their families, and called each other "friend" for the rest of the
day. A football game started and soon the war was converted into a peaceful game. To this day no one knows who won the game, but it really didn't matter. They built bonfires which glowed well into the night.

Finally the long dreaded moment had come- time for each side to return to their
trenches. The soldiers said goodbye to their new friends, and sank down into
their muddy holes. With a heavy heart, the firing began again, and the war
continued for four more years.

This has been cut and pasted from articles

Extreme_One
12-22-2003, 07:39 AM
I wish it could be Christmas every day! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S! Simon

Download the USAAF campaign folder here (http://www.mudmovers.com/Sims/FB/fb_essential_files.htm).

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Cajun76
12-22-2003, 07:44 AM
I've always loved moments in time like that. Maybe there's hope for us after all. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Good hunting,
Cajun76

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
-Aristotle

Meanwhile, in the 20th century:

BOOM! Yeah, Alright you primitive screwheads, listen up. See this? This is my JUG!! It's has 8 .50cals and 2000lbs+ worth of bombs and rockets. Republic's top of the line. You can find this in the Kick A$$ department. That's right, this sweet baby was made in Farmingdale, Long Island and Evansville, Indiana. Retails for about $82,997.95. It's got a turbo-supercharger, all metal control surfaces with blunt nosed ailerons, and a hair trigger. That's right, shop right, shop Republic. YOU GOT THAT!? Now I swear, the next one of you primates, E-ven TOUCHES me..... - Anonymous http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

georgeo76
12-22-2003, 07:45 AM
Turns out that the command for each side had to withdraw the troops involved in the "Christmas truce". After meeting w/ and relating to, the enemy, soldiers on both sides became ineffective at killing one another.

Of all the insanity of war in general and WWI in particular, the "Christmas truce" was perhaps the single most sane moment in war. Where two sides got the chance to meet the enemy and discover they were kids just like us. That the only difference between me and my "enemy" was the color of our uniform and the direction that we faced. He too was cold, wet, and homesick.

http://webpages.charter.net/Stick_Fiend/images/eddie.gif
Merry Christmas!
Fiend's Wings (http://webpages.charter.net/Stick_Fiend)

ohadbx
12-22-2003, 07:49 AM
wow, cool...
where did you heard of this?