PDA

View Full Version : Building a Gaming PC - Part 2: Building Your PC



Ubi-Cain
05-11-2016, 04:54 PM
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/BuildAPC_Part2_Featured_Small.jpg


Following on from the first part (http://forums.ubi.com/showthread.php/1444233-Building-a-gaming-PC-%96-Part-1-Getting-Started) of our build a PC guide it's time to put those parts to good use and get our build underway.

The below information will cover a basic approach to building your PC using one person's preferred method. This guide is just the initial iteration and will not be a one size fits all solution as there is a huge variation of hardware and while many standards are upheld universally, your experience may differ.

The initial aim here is to demonstrate that the process of building a PC can be simple, easy and depending on the type of person you are it can be a lot of fun too. Providing you're not installing a complex custom water-cooling loop the below information (along with a little common sense) should get you off to a good start.

Don't worry... it really is a bit like playing with high tech LEGO.


Step 1 - Preparation

So, let's get started shall we, and where better than some good old fashioned preparation. Yeah yeah, we know you want to open all those boxes straight away (and you might have already) but fortune favours the prepared.

Fortunately you're not going to need too much. Just get hold of:


A Screwdriver(s) (Phillips #1 and #2 recommended)
A nice flat non-conductive surface to work on
A safe place to put loose screws
Zip Ties (Optional)
Wire cutters/Scissors/Nail Clippers (For clipping the zip ties)
Up to 3 hours of free time (If you want to do everything in one sitting)



Step 2 - Gathering Your Parts

Right, with that done we can get all our bits and pieces of our build ready to go. If your will allows it, we'd recommend only unboxing what you need right now so that you don't lose anything along the way. Don't worry though... you'll get to play with it all soon.


http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Parts.jpg

As mentioned in our last guide you're going to need your hardware at hand to get started. You should have a:


Case
CPU (Processor)
Motherboard
RAM (Memory)
Storage (Hard Drive/Solid State Drive)
PSU (Power Supply)
GPU (Graphics Card) (If you wish to comfortably play newer games)
CPU Cooler (If not supplied with CPU)


For our build we're going to be using the following:


Case: Phanteks Enthoo Luxe (White)
CPU: Intel i7 6700k (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/CPU.jpg))
Motherboard: MSI Z170A Krait Gaming (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/Mobo.jpg))
RAM: 16GB DDR4 Corsair Vengeance LPX (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/RAM.jpg))
SSD 1: 128GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/SSD.jpg))
SSD 2: 512GB Samsung 950 PRO NVMe M.2 SSD (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/M2.jpg))
PSU: 750W Corsair HX750i (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/PSU.jpg))
GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 6GB (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/parts/GPU.jpg))
CPU Cooler: Corsair H105 (Closed loop Water Cooling)


In addition to the above we also picked up an extra 120mm fan, a Blue CableMod kit and an LED kit for showing off the insides of our new machine. These are entirely optional however. Contrary to what some might believe there is no evidence that supports fancy cables or LEDs making your PC faster... Unfortunately.

Anyway, let's continue.


Step 3 - Case Preparation

More preparation! Well, we're starting on the build now, but this might save you some time and frustration later.

Take both of the sides off of your case and put them to the side. You won't be needing those for a little while yet. Now is also a good time to spot any cable management spots/opportunities you might want to use. You'll also likely spot a few cables in the case already... these are for your power buttons, LEDs and the interface on the front of the case which most have these days.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image1.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image1.jpg)


For our case we also removed a shroud which covers the PSU, and we have removed both of our 5.25 Hard Drive bays as we're not going to need them.


Step 4 - Motherboard, CPU, RAM & Cooler Backplate Bundle

Some people mount their motherboard in the case straight away and then work inside their case, but to have more room to move around we prefer to create a little bundle of sorts to keep installation simple. So get your Motherboard, CPU and RAM ready to go.

IMPORTANT NOTE!
After unboxing your motherboard take note of your I/O Shield which should look a little something like this (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/extras/IOShield.jpg)). Many have made the mistake of forgetting about this until they've already installed their motherboard which means having to take everything out again, and we don;t want that. Put this in your case right now so you don't make that mistake. It slips into rectangular slot on the back of your case.

With that out of the way get that Motherboard laid down on your work surface and grab your CPU. Remove any cover from the CPU slot on the motherboard and then insert your CPU following the markings on the motherboard and CPU itself, there will also be indentations to make sure you have it in the correct place. Depending on your brand of CPU and motherboard there will also be a clamp to secure the CPU in place, don't forget to make sure it's secure.

BE CAREFUL!
While the bulk of PC hardware is not incredibly delicate, special care should be given when installing the CPU as there are a set of fine pins in the motherboard CPU slot that you do not want to bend. The CPU should require ZERO force to be placed correctly, it should simply fall into place.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image2.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image2.jpg)


Next up we'll install our RAM and again it's pretty straight forward. Pull back the tabs on the ends of the slots, take your sticks and place them in the appropriate slots. You'll be able to tell which way in your RAM needs to be inserted as one set of pins is longer than the other. Once you have done that give each stick a careful but firm push which will cause the tabs on the end to clamp onto the RAM and lock it in place.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image3.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image3.jpg)


Take note of which slots you're using if you have more slots than you have sticks of RAM. While it should work regardless you'll want to prioritize the primary slots which are usually identified on the motherboard. Like so (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/extras/RAMSlots.jpg))

Note: If you're spending the big bucks and using an NVMe M.2 SSD like we are, now is also a good opportunity to install that like we have as seen in the images above.

Last but not least for this part we're going to secure our CPU Cooler's back plate. While it is not necessary for this particular case, not all cases offer easy access to the rear of the motherboard once it is installed. Some can be stuck to the back using the attached adhesive plates but in our case we had the mounting screws to keep everything secure.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image4.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image4.jpg)



Step 5 - Motherboard Bundle Installation

Now that we have our nice bundle of goodies put together it's time to mount it in our case and to do that you'll want to lay your case down and slide you motherboard into position so that the mounting holes line up with mounts in the case. (You'll also want to make sure that your ports are accessible through your I/O Shield at the back)

These can vary depending on your motherboard, but typically the mounts installed in the case should cover most supported motherboards. In our case you can find the mounts located in the following locations (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/extras/MOBOInstall.jpg)). If yours differ you can remove the mounting screws and place them in the additional mounting holes of the case, so there's no need to worry.

Once you have it in place, get it screwed in.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image5.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image5.jpg)


Step 6 - Power Supply & Drive Installation

With the Motherboard mounted it's time to get a couple other things put in place. These being our Storage Drives and Power Supply. Also optional at this stage would be any additional fans you may want to include.

In most scenarios the power supply will be located at the base of the case in the rear and it's as simple as sliding it into place so that the power input leaves the back and the screw holes in the PSU line up with those of the case. You can then screw it into place using the screws included with your power supply. Fans are the same.

The PSU we are using is modular so we only plug in the cables that we need. If you are using a non-modular PSU just keep your cables tucked away for the time being.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image6.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image6.jpg)


NOTE ON AIRFLOW!
When installing case fans into your PC it's important to have a steady stream of air flowing through your case. In 99% of cases this is: Air in through the front and out of the back and top. Fans only move air in 1 direction so when installing them take note of the direction of the air flow which is indicated on the sides of the fan using 2 small arrows. 1 signifying blade spin direction, the other the flow of air.

Next we'll mount our Storage Drives. For many cases there are located in the front of the case in racks or cages. Consult your case manual if you need assistance here, but they are typically quite straight forward and often toolless. In our build we are only using a single 2.5inch SSD and our mounts are located in the rear of the case.

Since SSDs have no moving parts it's generally safe to simply place these in the case without any screws, however if you plan on moving your case around it doesn't hurt to add a couple for that extra safety.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image7.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image7.jpg)


Step 7 - CPU Cooler Installation

This step might vary for some depending on the cooler you are using. When using a large and bulky air cooler it's usually beneficial to do step 8 before this. If that's not the case however we prefer to get this out of the way now and work around it.

This step can vary wildly depending on the cooler you are using and in most cases you will want to consult the manual for your particular cooler but in our build we've gone for a popular all-in-one closed look water cooler. These are growing in popularity and are both reliable and offer great results for both your everyday use and for overclocking. Typically they install in a very similar manner too.

Anyway, remember the back plate and mounting screws we added in Step 4? Well it's time to put them to use, but not before one vital step.

NOTE ON THERMAL COMPOUND!
Most cooling solutions come with a pre-applied thermal compound or “thermal paste” on the base of the cooling plate that has to come in contact with the CPU. Thermal compound allows for the reduction of imperfections (gaps) between the base of the cooler and the CPU and provides better conduction of heat which results in better cooling. It's usually a grey/silver substance but can sometimes be white. It is always recommended to use this.

Personally we prefer to remove whatever comes pre applied and use our own. If you're stuck on which to use, Arctic Silver 5 is always a trusty go to, but any silver based thermal compound will do the trick. So before installing your cooler just apply a small amount (About the size of a large grain of rice) to the CPU.

As we are using a closed water cooling loop we need to mount our radiator. These are usually mounted in addition to 1 or more fans depending on the size of the radiator and in our case we're using 2 120mm fans which we will mount at the top of the case using the existing fan mounts.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image8.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image8.jpg)


For the installation of the base plate/pump, just line up the holes on the base plate to the screws we installed earlier in Step 4 and them use the thumb screws to secure it in place. Just make sure to tighten the screws slowly and give each a few turns at a time. Do not fully tighten any single screw before the others as this will cause you cooler to sit crooked which may result in poor cooling, and could damage your motherboard.

You will also need to plug your pump in to power it. This can be done quite simply by plugging it into the CPU fan header which is usually located near the CPU itself and is clearly marked (Usually as “CPU FAN”). Example (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/extras/CPUFanHeader.jpg))



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image9.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image9.jpg)


Step 8 - Getting Connected & Cable Management

With all but one of our components installed it's time start getting everything connected. This means connecting the interface on the front of the case, our storage drives and connecting up the power.

First we'll get the case components and interface out of the way and as mentioned in Step 3.

So, most cases these days come with front facing USBs and 3.5mm headphone and mic jacks. These all need to be connected to the motherboard so that they actually work. The cables should all be clearly labelled on the ends and will correspond with matching ports on the motherboard in addition to having certain pins blocked so that you can only plug them into the correct ports. Pretty neat, huh? Example (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/extras/CaseInterfacePorts.jpg))

In addition you will also have several smaller cables often with 2 pins each. These are for the buttons and LEDs on your case so that you can actually turn your PC on. These also need to be plugged into the motherboard and like the other cables are clearly marked on the cables themselves and on the motherboard and can be seen in the example image above. For those with larger hands a set of needle nose pliers can prevent some potential frustration here. If you;re lucky, your motherboard may come with an adapter for these, which can make connecting them much easier.

After you have done that you'll want to get your power connected to the motherboard and your storage drives. And for that you'll need to connect at least the following:


24-Pin Motherboard PowerCable (Sometimes 20-Pin)
8-Pin CPU Power Cable (Sometimes 4-Pin)
SATA Cables (For Storage Drives and CD Drives)
PCIe Power Cables (For GPU(s) which you'll install next)


On an occasion you may also need to use SATA or MOLEX cables for case fans, and other accessories. Most PSUs come with ample amounts of each.

IF IT DOESN'T FIT, IT DOESN'T BELONG
The connectors on power cables have a set of shaped pins on them. These serve a valuable purpose in that each port has a unique combination of pin shapes so you don't go plugging the wrong cable into the wrong piece of hardware. If you find you're having trouble plugging a cable into a particular port, it's likely that it doesn't belong there.

While going through this step it's worth keeping in mind that you can try to route your cables through the back of your case. This helps keep things clean and open the airflow channels. After you're done, you might have something that looks a bit like this.



(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image10-2.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image10.jpg)



If you are feeling particularly dedicated to keeping things clean there's no reason why you can clean up the cables in the back too. Example (See Image (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/extras/CableManagementFinal.jpg))


Step 9 - GPU Installation

We're almost there... just one last thing. If you're going to be playing some games, you're probably going to want to install that graphics card that has been staring at you for the past couple of hours.

This one, like the other steps in this build is pretty simple. All you have to do is remove 1 or 2 of the PCI extension slot covers from the back (Depending on if you have a single or dual slot card) this is usually done by removing a screw but in some cases the design may be toolless.

Once you have done that place your card into the desired PCIe slot and when it is firmly in place apply the screws or the clamps back where the card meets the extension slot to hold the card steady. When you've done that you can connect up the power and you're pretty much ready to boot that baby up!

Note: Not all PCIe slots created equal. In our build we have used the second PCIe slot for our graphics card. This was done aesthetic purposes and to reduce the weight/pull of the power cables. The slot used is an x8 slot (Contrary to our earlier statement) but will not bottleneck our GPU in any way. If in doubt, it is usually advised to use to top most slot which in the majority of moder motherboards is almost always a full speed x16 slot


(Click image for larger version)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/small/Image11-2.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/large/Image11.jpg)


Step 10 - Boot Test + Closing Up

Purely out of best practice it's always worth booting up your brand new build before putting the case sides back on just to make sure your new PC successfully POSTs (Power-on self-test). If you get to the point where you're being asked for a disk or operating system, chances are you're good to move on to installing windows and it's probably ok to put those case sides back on and to put your new PC in its new home.



(Click images for larger versions)
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Vanity1_Small.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Vanity1.jpg)

http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Vanity2_Small.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Vanity2.jpg)

http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Vanity3_Small.jpg (http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step2/Vanity3.jpg)


Well, that's all for now folks. We hope that this guide proves helpful or does away with any doubts you may have had about building your own PC. It's not as complicated as some might have you think and it really is a bit like high tech LEGO with safety mechanisms and labels in place.

If you have any further questions don't hesitate to ask, and as we mentioned at the beginning of this guide, it is only the first iteration and will likely expand in future. Don't forget, the community also have your back and if you're in the middle of a build you can always ask them. As mentioned in our getting started guide (http://forums.ubi.com/showthread.php/1444233-Building-a-gaming-PC-%96-Part-1-Getting-Started) there are great communities out there like r/buildapc (https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc) that can often help you out.

We'll be back with more guides in the future to help you enhance and customize your PC and your gaming experience but until then, we'll see you in-game.


-----------------------------
The Uplay Team

bAM.Bluethunder
05-12-2016, 04:02 PM
Why would you put your graphics card into a PCIe 8x slot, if you have enough space to put it in the 16x slot?
I don't get that, is it just for looks?

And i personally would go with white cable sleeve, since that blue doesn't really fit the one on the cooler and fans.

Beside that, nice and clean looking built :)

ScottytooH0tty
05-12-2016, 06:19 PM
Why would you put your graphics card into a PCIe 8x slot, if you have enough space to put it in the 16x slot?
I don't get that, is it just for looks?

And i personally would go with white cable sleeve, since that blue doesn't really fit the one on the cooler and fans.

Beside that, nice and clean looking built :)

I guess you didn't read the note at the bottom?

Ubi-Cain
05-12-2016, 06:48 PM
Why would you put your graphics card into a PCIe 8x slot, if you have enough space to put it in the 16x slot?
I don't get that, is it just for looks?

And i personally would go with white cable sleeve, since that blue doesn't really fit the one on the cooler and fans.

Beside that, nice and clean looking built :)

EDIT: Slot used in build is an x8 slot, but will not bottle neck the card in any way. an x8 slot still has more than enough bandwidth to handle 980ti,

I did try getting a hold of some white and blue cables but could't get any in a convenient manner, so I decided to go for the blues in the end. There's already so much white in and out of the case (because of the case itself mainly) that I felt it would need a little more blue.

Sadly the photos don't really do it justice and the cables appear darker in those than they do in actuality when the case is closed up and powered on. The RAM and Cooler pump accent also appear washed out a bit in the images too, while in person they almost glow a vibrant blue.

I'll still tinker with it in the future too so it'll improve along the way. Going to get my hands on some nice white cable combs to start with :)

stevespyda
05-12-2016, 10:18 PM
Hi guys nice thread
this is my build and to be honest looks a little similar apart from your looking a lot neater :)

http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee147/ST3V01972/pc01_zps20sjtegk.jpg (http://s235.photobucket.com/user/ST3V01972/media/pc01_zps20sjtegk.jpg.html)

MSI Z170A XPower Gaming Titanium Edition Intel Z170

KFA2 GeForce GTX 980Ti "Hall of Fame 8Pack Approved Edition" 6144MB

NZXT H440 New 2015 Edition Case - White & Black

EVGA SuperNova G2 750W '80 Plus Gold' Modular Power Supply

Intel Core i5-6600K 3.9GHz (Skylake)

Corsair Hydro H110i GT 280mm Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler

Samsung 950 Pro 256GB M.2 PCI-e 3.0 x 4 NVMe Solid State Drive

Samsung 512GB SSD 850 PRO SATA 6Gbps 3D NAND Solid State Drive

Corsair Dominator Platinum 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4 PC4-24000C15 3000MHz

DazKRaptorSquad
05-14-2016, 02:16 AM
Any chance you can provide the cost of the components? Just be interested in how much I can save by doing it myself.

Cheers

JarodMcGregger
05-14-2016, 06:50 PM
The real question is : Is there any chance that you would give me your "sample" Gaming PC as a gift? :confused:
You surely don't need it, because - you build it only for demonstration, or not?! :o

I play Tom Clancy's The Division on my Intel Q9450/ 8GB RAM/ Geforce GTX570... it works - but it isn't real fun! If I bend to fast around a corner - my PC is to slow to render the ground... and so I crash realy often through the bottom... :nonchalance:

So I would be really, really happy if you would sponsoring me! :cool:

Hope you think about it... ;)

Many thanks
JarodMcGregger

Blue_Fyre
05-14-2016, 07:30 PM
looks neat! i want to build this summer a new gaming PC, and because i didnt got unlimited cash, how much does this build cost? it has good stats, aside from the hard drives, but these are optional anyway. thanks already

Preacher138
05-19-2016, 01:06 AM
The thing with this is that it looks as if your going to spend over 1000 american for this machine when you can build a gaming computer for 500 american. Sorry ubisoft but let people know that live on a fixed budget what they are going to be spending after you give them the information with a how to. Granted a $500 gaming PC won't be overclocked or have the cooling system that this has. But since I live in this thing I grudgingly like to call reality the gaming PC for 500 is more reasonable than this is.

AHrobby
05-19-2016, 06:01 AM
As Scotty sort of mentioned, it is explained in the guide why I used that slot and that it does indeed receive 16 lanes (from the CPU).
I also included a note that mentions that you might not want to do this in some cases.

I did try getting a hold of some white and blue cables but could't get any in a convenient manner, so I decided to go for the blues in the end. There's already so much white in and out of the case (because of the case itself mainly) that I felt it would need a little more blue.

Sadly the photos don't really do it justice and the cables appear darker in those than they do in actuality when the case is closed up and powered on. The RAM and Cooler pump accent also appear washed out a bit in the images too, while in person they almost glow a vibrant blue.

I'll still tinker with it in the future too so it'll improve along the way. Going to get my hands on some nice white cable combs to start with :)

So, yes, I did see the note. However, I looked it up, and this motherboard's second PCIe slot is indeed a 8x slot. You can always work on fixing the cabling and whatnot in your case. The cringe is too strong here...

bAM.Bluethunder
05-21-2016, 11:01 PM
So, yes, I did see the note. However, I looked it up, and this motherboard's second PCIe slot is indeed a 8x slot. You can always work on fixing the cabling and whatnot in your case. The cringe is too strong here...

Exactly! You don't even have to look it up, you can clearly see, that that slot is just soldered half, so it is connected with 8 lanes only.
To be honest, i haven't seen a 115x mainboard with more than one 16x slot yet, CPUs for this type of socket can't even run more than 16 lanes.

kncybul92
05-22-2016, 05:11 AM
Is I just built my new computer, finished it today.

Very similar to yours except I went with a Corsair 450D Obsidian Case and I used all EVGA and Corsair pretty much everything else.

It cost about $1946.00

hit3m
05-22-2016, 03:15 PM
I was wondering what the reasoning behind putting the fans above the CPU radiator (pull) rather then below (push) ?
I have about the same setup HW wize but the only difference was that i put the fans below the radiator (push). Should perhaps mention that its a H110 i use instead of the one you had but the rest is the same. My own reasoning for this was that the push actualy gave me 2C less temperature on the CPU overall and it helped the circulation alot better then the pull technic (less dust getting stuck in the radiator aswell).

digitaldark1
05-23-2016, 09:51 PM
Personally we prefer to remove whatever comes pre applied and use our own. If you're stuck on which to use, Arctic Silver 5 is always a trusty go to, but any silver based thermal compound will do the trick. So before installing your cooler just apply a small amount (About the size of a large grain of rice) to the CPU.

Did you guys really just promote AS5 above most default thermal compounds? The stuff is good, and was awesome 15 years ago, but these days most of the big cooler brands include higher performing compounds with their coolers. If you said Gelid Extreme or Prolimatech pk-3, fine... but AS5 is well surpassed these days.

Ubi-Cain
05-23-2016, 10:34 PM
Did you guys really just promote AS5 above most default thermal compounds? The stuff is good, and was awesome 15 years ago, but these days most of the big cooler brands include higher performing compounds with their coolers. If you said Gelid Extreme or Prolimatech pk-3, fine... but AS5 is well surpassed these days.

Sure, the stock stuff is fine on most branded coolers these days, but applying your own is an easy step to try out and a good practice to get into.

AS5 isn;t the best sure, and there are better products out there that will gain you a couple of degrees... maybe, but this guide is not about using the best of everything.

killakh0le
05-24-2016, 05:09 AM
Any chance you can provide the cost of the components? Just be interested in how much I can save by doing it myself.

Cheers

You don't want to know but as an example I bought my 256GB Samsung NVMe Samsung 950 Pro m.2240 for $200 in December 2015. This OP is crazy as this is what I built as a basic SQL server minus the gpu and a total of 32Gb of RAM for work! This is a godly machine in terms of hardware, minus the CPU but is overkill for EVERYTHING but I like overkill when I can afford it. I just don't get it as this guide is supposedly for beginners as any techie has built multiple rigs before and a noob wouldn't spend this much money on their first build so to me this is just OP bragging about his gear...pfftt be gone with ya, I'm surprised you didn't tell them to get another Ti and SLI them!

Again nice rig OP, I also have some similar specs and gear but still don't get the meaning of this as you should have gone with an $1k build tops with the goal of explaining the bare minimum hardware needed to run at a very high quality. This is just counterintuitive with it being a build for beginners but hardware of a season vet of the console wars. Or did I miss something?

Ubi-Cain
05-24-2016, 04:01 PM
You don't want to know but as an example I bought my 256GB Samsung NVMe Samsung 950 Pro m.2240 for $200 in December 2015. This OP is crazy as this is what I built as a basic SQL server minus the gpu and a total of 32Gb of RAM for work! This is a godly machine in terms of hardware, minus the CPU but is overkill for EVERYTHING but I like overkill when I can afford it. I just don't get it as this guide is supposedly for beginners as any techie has built multiple rigs before and a noob wouldn't spend this much money on their first build so to me this is just OP bragging about his gear...pfftt be gone with ya, I'm surprised you didn't tell them to get another Ti and SLI them!

Again nice rig OP, I also have some similar specs and gear but still don't get the meaning of this as you should have gone with an $1k build tops with the goal of explaining the bare minimum hardware needed to run at a very high quality. This is just counterintuitive with it being a build for beginners but hardware of a season vet of the console wars. Or did I miss something?

The hardware pertains to the computer's use. It was not purchased solely for the purpose of creating this guide, otherwise, yeah... I would have probably gone for something a little more modest :)

BARBARA-1
05-24-2016, 06:35 PM
http://i062.radikal.ru/1605/d9/f0c700438e38.jpg (http://radikal.ru/big/723d1546607f46fa97f30863d7114054)

iGumball v1
06-04-2016, 08:21 PM
The thing with this is that it looks as if your going to spend over 1000 american for this machine when you can build a gaming computer for 500 american. Sorry ubisoft but let people know that live on a fixed budget what they are going to be spending after you give them the information with a how to. Granted a $500 gaming PC won't be overclocked or have the cooling system that this has. But since I live in this thing I grudgingly like to call reality the gaming PC for 500 is more reasonable than this is.

Yes, you can easily build a $500 gaming rig, but there comes a few issues with that. First, you wont get nearly close to the "best" of anything on the market today with that kind of money. Most newer CPU's run about $300, and you would need at least an i5 to be able to run most games efficiently and thats before you even get a GPU, which can run anywhere from $100-$1100. That puts you at 2 components of a gaming rig before you even get a MoBo, RAM, Case, PSU, HDD/SSD, Cooling, etc. So yes, you could build a $500 "gaming" PC, but you wont be able to do much else other than play games on the lowest settings. A PC isn't just meant for gaming, though. Most people could justify having a separate PC just for that but most of those PC's are beefy and capable of running virtually any program at high settings/speeds. You get what you pay for and a $500 Desktop computer just sounds sad to me...