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Ubi-Cain
05-04-2016, 04:12 PM
http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/BuildAPC_Featured2.jpg


Part 2 - Building Your PC can be found HERE! (http://forums.ubi.com/showthread.php/1447290-Building-a-Gaming-PC-Part-2-Building-Your-PC)


If you spend enough time online or talk to other gamers you’ve probably heard horror stories about how difficult it is to build a PC, or even the opposite and that it’s child’s play and as simple as putting a few blocks of Lego together. If you’re new to PC gaming or if you haven’t built your own yet it’s understandable that you might receive some mixed messages and that’s ok… but it’s really not as hard as you might think when you know where to look.

With this guide we hope to help you get started on your way to PC gaming which for us here on the Uplay PC team at least, is the preferred gaming platform.

The aim here is to provide you with the resources you need to make educated decisions towards your first, or maybe even your next PC build. There’s a plethora of knowledge out there for you to take advantage of and we’re going to shed some light on it.


Why build your own PC?

Prebuilt PCs can get the job done, there’s no doubt about that and there are many options on the market. If you’re not confident enough to build your own, or prefer to “play it safe” you’ll always have plenty to choose from. It’s also nice to know that a professional has done the work and you can expect it to work out of the box, but there are a couple of key benefits to building your own.

First it’s generally much cheaper to build it yourself. I mean, who doesn’t love saving money… money that you can then invest back into your PC for better parts? This isn’t always the case, but in general it’s money saved that you can put back into your build.

Second is that you have more options to tailor your build to your needs than many stores have to offer and you can also ensure that you’re getting the best hardware for your money. Some online stores are good for customization but this usually leads back to the first point.

There are more reasons, but we would consider the above to be the most important.



http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step1/Image1_Small.JPG


Where to Start?

So you’re going to need to buy parts, and this is where some people get a little intimidated. There’s a lot more involved than simply heading to the store and picking up a small box that you need to plug in.

You’ll need the following: (If you plan on playing games)

Case
CPU (Processor)
GPU (Graphics Card)
Motherboard
RAM (Memory)
Storage (HDD/SSD)
PSU (Power Supply)


Some other things you might need if you don’t have them already:

Keyboard
Mouse
Monitor
Speakers / Headset
Operating System
CPU Cooler*


*Stock coolers can suffice for average day to day use. If you’re looking to overclock or plan on pushing your PC to the limit however you should consider an aftermarket solution. In addition, some CPUs do not come with a cooler, so always double check this before purchasing.



http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step1/Image2_Small.jpg


There are a lot of manufacturers out there making a lot of different hardware and knowing what to pick can be a daunting task, but there are people and services here to help.

choosemypc.net

This website is fairly simple… you select a few options and a price range and you will be provided with a build that meets those criteria. Currently the website only offers a limited selection of currencies for the estimates, but it’s an easy way to get a working parts list together.

Every build has gaming in mind and the offered parts are always of good quality from well establish manufacturers.

If you find a build here that you like, you can always click the button at the bottom to move on to the next resource we’ll talk about.



Visit choosemypc.net (https://choosemypc.net/)


pcpartpicker.com

PCPartPicker is a fantastic website when it comes to working on a new build regardless of if it’s your first or your tenth. The website hosts a number of user completed builds which you can pick from or you can use their build calculator to construct your own.

The build calculator allows you to add individual parts and will try to offer you that are compatible with each other, so you don’t risk getting incompatible parts. Furthermore, should you manage to pick 2 incompatible parts you’re receive a warning letting you know and what you should consider doing to fix it.

You’ll also be given a list of prices which are taken from reputable stores (For the supported countries) to ensure you have the best possible prices.

Both websites offer options to get the parts lists so that you can share them with others too, so if you need a second opinion, it’s easy to send a list to a friend, or you can ask the community.



Visit pcpartpicker.com (http://pcpartpicker.com/)


/r/buildapc

If you’re ever in doubt or maybe just the social type you can always rely on the amazing PC community to help you out. This sub, as you might imagine from the name, is dedicated to helping people build their own PCs so on the subject we’re covering today, there are few better places to go if you’re in need of advice.

The community here are helpful, and can often answer anything you throw at them, from the simplest of questions to the trickiest. So if you get stuck along the way know that there are people you can ask… hey, you’re always welcome to ask us too.



Visit r/buildapc (https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc)


What’s Next?

If you’ve picked up your parts the next step is to put everything together. We’ll have a guide coming up for that soon that you can check out, but in the meantime there is no shortage of resources to help you on your way. Many of which can be found in the websites we’ve mentioned today.



http://static3.cdn.ubi.com/orbit/uplaynews/main/buildapc/step1/Image3_Small.JPG


That’s it from us today… we hope this has been a useful collection of tips for you to take a look at and that you’ll come and join the PC gaming community in the near future. We look forward to seeing you in-game.


-----------------------------
The Uplay Team

ScottytooH0tty
05-04-2016, 07:14 PM
I wish people would stop saying its much cheaper to build a PC rather than buying a prebuilt because that is not true unless you are looking at branded prebuilt pc's like alienware or dell. If you buy a prebuilt from a site like overclockers or PC specialist a lot of the time it works out around the same price and in some cases it can be cheaper plus if the prebuilt you have selected has a different branded item to what you prefer i.e it has an gigabyte graphics card in it but you want Asus in most cases they will swap it out for you.

I have been tinkering with and building PC's for 20 years an I don't even bother building myself anymore.

However if you are a PC gamer and you are looking to buy a new PC but don't really know what all the parts do and how they work it is a good idea to build one for yourself to get a better understanding of what things do, that way troubleshooting your own PC when you get issues could save you repair costs.

AdmiraL_Mohamad
05-04-2016, 07:32 PM
i like this topic , and i hope i can build a new computer for gaming i try to save money last 6 month and i save 400 $ only that's not enough to get a GPU :rolleyes: , what can you do if your wage is 300$ per month :(

TheDarkSwarm
05-04-2016, 08:36 PM
You’ll need the following: (If you plan on playing games)

Case
CPU (Processor)
PGU (Graphics Card)


Lol a PGU?
I don`t think you'll get graphics out of whatever a PGU is.

I would recommend a GPU ;)

M.Sword.Y.Face
05-04-2016, 09:38 PM
thanks for the effort. why not create different tiers of recommended build?

Ubi-Cain
05-04-2016, 10:35 PM
I wish people would stop saying its much cheaper to build a PC rather than buying a prebuilt because that is not true unless you are looking at branded prebuilt pc's like alienware or dell. If you buy a prebuilt from a site like overclockers or PC specialist a lot of the time it works out around the same price and in some cases it can be cheaper plus if the prebuilt you have selected has a different branded item to what you prefer i.e it has an gigabyte graphics card in it but you want Asus in most cases they will swap it out for you.

I have been tinkering with and building PC's for 20 years an I don't even bother building myself anymore.

However if you are a PC gamer and you are looking to buy a new PC but don't really know what all the parts do and how they work it is a good idea to build one for yourself to get a better understanding of what things do, that way troubleshooting your own PC when you get issues could save you repair costs.
I did say in general it's cheaper :)

It's certainly not always the case and a lot of countries are not as fortunate as we Brits (Assuming you're British given you mention Overclockers and PCSpecialist) are in that we have some of these great companies selling prebuilts without a huge margin on top for it being that way.

The whole idea though is education and helping people to be better informed. It doesn't hurt for someone to price up the parts and see how big the margin is for them :)



Lol a PGU?
Whoops!
Fixed ;)


thanks for the effort. why not create different tiers of recommended build?
I'd rather help people to make educated decisions than provide a bunch of recommended builds that may or may not meet someone's needs or budget.

There's always new tech coming out too which would make the upkeep of these guides costly in terms of time and I wouldn't want people buying something that I might not wish to recommend in a month's time.

Got to keep up with all the benchmarks, prices, promotions and a bunch of other stuff and it's a lot to keep up with for lil' ol' me. I'd love to do it if I could keep up, but it's not really feasible for me :)

NSU_Hi0nm4iden
05-04-2016, 11:11 PM
I wish people would stop saying its much cheaper to build a PC rather than buying a prebuilt because that is not true unless you are looking at branded prebuilt pc's like alienware or dell. If you buy a prebuilt from a site like overclockers or PC specialist a lot of the time it works out around the same price and in some cases it can be cheaper plus if the prebuilt you have selected has a different branded item to what you prefer i.e it has an gigabyte graphics card in it but you want Asus in most cases they will swap it out for you.

I have been tinkering with and building PC's for 20 years an I don't even bother building myself anymore.

However if you are a PC gamer and you are looking to buy a new PC but don't really know what all the parts do and how they work it is a good idea to build one for yourself to get a better understanding of what things do, that way troubleshooting your own PC when you get issues could save you repair costs.

I'm sorry but when I build my newest system in December, there was not a single site, including overclockers (my main place to buy parts) that offered a 980TI (not blower edition) with a 6600k. No need for 6700k due to only gaming. And I paid only £1250. The cheapest pc i could find offering a 980ti with a 6700k was £1700. and the 6600k for £1300 had a 970. So yeah I saved a load of money, not only that But I've got PREMIUM and better quality components that fit my needs. I've just had a look on OCUK and there have a system for £1300 with a 980ti and a 6600k. so thats good, but the cpu coolers sucks! the case is meh. the gpu is a blower... noise bluergh.

Building your own in most cases is cheaper, but not only that you can get the branded items that are better and will always be better. i'd chhose my system over the one OCUK are selling anyday. gpu is vastly superior, case is better, psu is better, ram is better, my black/white theme is better. so yeah building your own had so many advantages and is cheaper depending on the 'quality' of components. Most sites just stick a load of crap in there.

TheDankInvader
05-05-2016, 07:28 AM
This is quite the nice article, I want to add that it is very possible to upgrade from a pre-built if you don't really want to start from scratch. For example I am in Mexico, and we get nice payment options for HP Desktops. They come with "decent" GPU, enough to get you to play some really good games like Rayman Legends, or Child of Light (Sequel when?) but Lmao if you even try to run The Divsion which is a huge resource hog (What's up with that Ubi? Dark Souls 3 and Crysis 2 run on Ultra with less resources).

What I did initially was to get a new PSU, and a new GPU. The 750ti is just a thing of beauty, literally the best buck for bang GPU ever made. The sucker goes as low as 99 USD and a decent PSU with a bronze standard and a 2 year guarantee goes for about $60 USD, more or less. Bam! that is enough to play mostly anything with some reasonable tweaking to the graphic settings or at least some really good games on ultra at 60FPS....taking into account you are upgrading a desktop with moderately good specs, for example mine came with a i7 Gen III which is still pretty good to this very day, and 8GB of RAM which is the recommended minimum these days.


From there it is even easier to upgrade, at this point the only original piece left if the Blu-Ray reader!

ScottytooH0tty
05-05-2016, 07:05 PM
I'm sorry but when I build my newest system in December, there was not a single site, including overclockers (my main place to buy parts) that offered a 980TI (not blower edition) with a 6600k. No need for 6700k due to only gaming. And I paid only £1250. The cheapest pc i could find offering a 980ti with a 6700k was £1700. and the 6600k for £1300 had a 970. So yeah I saved a load of money, not only that But I've got PREMIUM and better quality components that fit my needs. I've just had a look on OCUK and there have a system for £1300 with a 980ti and a 6600k. so thats good, but the cpu coolers sucks! the case is meh. the gpu is a blower... noise bluergh.

Building your own in most cases is cheaper, but not only that you can get the branded items that are better and will always be better. i'd chhose my system over the one OCUK are selling anyday. gpu is vastly superior, case is better, psu is better, ram is better, my black/white theme is better. so yeah building your own had so many advantages and is cheaper depending on the 'quality' of components. Most sites just stick a load of crap in there.

The problem with most people including you (and I don't mean that as an insult) is that they over think things and think buying ultra high end components is going to make a real difference when in reality the only two items that will make any real difference to performance are the cpu and gpu, the rest only really applies to people that do competition bench marking and professional work such as design/3d art/ and rendering but really still only bench markers that see any real results.

Id put money on that if I upgraded my GPU to the same graphics card as you that the performance would be almost the same and the rest of my PC is :

ASUS PBZ77-V LX2 - i5 3570k oc'd to 4.4ghz - Alpenfohn K2 Mount Doom CPU cooler - Gigabyte GTX780 Windforce - 16gb kingston HyperX 1600mhz - Creative X-fi soundcard - 250gb 850 EVO - 2x 60GB OCZ Vertex - 1TB Seagate Barracuda - Be quiet 630 watt PSU - Iiyama 27" 120hz - Dell Ultrasharp 22" - Logitech g70 mouse - Cyborg V5 Keyboard - Logitech Z-5500 speakers - Blue Snawball mic.

And as I said in my previous post most of the site's including overclockers will swap out any component to what ever you want.

SF_LostBoy
05-06-2016, 06:00 PM
Cool article. I actually could use some help putting a new pc together. What do you guys think?

What am i looking for? I'm looking to create game content which my current setup simply can't handle.
Current budget setup: http://i.imgur.com/sukeqyk.png

The current build I'm looking at: http://i.imgur.com/CG1wDTf.png
The HDD is an extra one since i already have an SSD as you can see.
I also have a cooler which is a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO for cooling my current CPU. I assume that one would do great for the next one.
Also still didn't pick a new power supply.

The questions:
Should i actually upgrade my motherboard to the selected one? Or should i stick with my current one Gigabyte GA-970A-DS3P?
Should i actually go with this setup or should i swap to Intel. If i should swap to intel, why and what would be a good setup around the same budget?

ScottytooH0tty
05-07-2016, 12:36 AM
Cool article. I actually could use some help putting a new pc together. What do you guys think?

What am i looking for? I'm looking to create game content which my current setup simply can't handle.
Current budget setup: http://i.imgur.com/sukeqyk.png

The current build I'm looking at: http://i.imgur.com/CG1wDTf.png
The HDD is an extra one since i already have an SSD as you can see.
I also have a cooler which is a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO for cooling my current CPU. I assume that one would do great for the next one.
Also still didn't pick a new power supply.

The questions:
Should i actually upgrade my motherboard to the selected one? Or should i stick with my current one Gigabyte GA-970A-DS3P?
Should i actually go with this setup or should i swap to Intel. If i should swap to intel, why and what would be a good setup around the same budget?

Honestly do yourself a favour and ditch the AMD cpu, they really aren't work their money, intel CPU's are miles better.

Dimedrl
05-08-2016, 12:49 AM
You forgot at least two case fans on top of whatever comes with the case. 120mm fans are dirt cheap and installing them will reduce heat and extend system life. If you're building a moderately powerful system, you want those extra fans for running newer games on higher settings. Once the GPU really kicks it up a notch to render higher frame rates, you'll want the extra case fans pulling that extra heat out of the box.


Also, Pro-tip for the CoolerMaster Hyper 212 Evo:

The 212 Evo is a space hog once you have the fan on it. Especially if you use the included fan to "push" heat rather than "pull" heat; push being the fan mounted so that air is pushed into the heat spreaders towards the back of the case rather then pull, where the fan is mounted so that air is pulled out from the heat spreaders towards the back of the case.

In either the push configuration with one fan, or the push-pull configuration with two fans, the push fan can cover up a RAM slot if the slots are close to the CPU socket. Consider buying a slim PWM fan for you 212 Evo. The default included fan is 120mm x 120mm x 25mm, while a slim fan is 120mm x 120mm x 15mm. That 10mm may not sound like a lot, but it can be the difference between having access to three RAM slots or four RAM slots.

In my system, I run a 212 Evo with two Silverstone Tek FW121 slim fans in push-pull configuration. Using two fans increases heat removal and the thin fans let me run four RAM sticks. To improve heat removal even more, I mounted the fan included with the 212 Evo to the back of my case, so whatever heat is pulled off the 212 is sucked directly out of the system.

Be sure to get a "PWM" fan though, not a regular PC fan. A regular fan uses 3 pin connectors. A PWM fan uses four pin connectors and the extra pin is used to allow the computer to control fan speed. You should always use PWM fans for CPU cooling. If you go the Silverstone route, get the FW121. You'll be glad you did in the long run. You may find a Silverstone Tek FN123 slim fan when you look for this and decide to go with it because it's cheaper. DON'T. That fan is only 3 pins.

beyondtool
05-08-2016, 10:49 AM
http://www.logicalincrements.com/

Nuff said.

beyondtool
05-08-2016, 11:09 AM
Honestly do yourself a favour and ditch the AMD cpu, they really aren't work their money, intel CPU's are miles better.

It depends on your situation. If you are looking at Direct X 12 titles and happy to overclock than the fx8350 will keep up with anything thrown at it (including Rise of the Tomb Raider) as long as you have adequate cooling. There are a few poorly optimised single core titles that may struggle more with an AMD system though. I'm dead happy with the mileage I have got out of my 8320FX@4.5Ghz and the bang for buck smokes anything Intel have on offer (it cost me $130!!!!!!!!), though I would wait till later in the year if possible as AMD Zen is coming. It could be an incredibly game changer if previews are to be believed.

However, I wouldn't be getting an Nvidia 980 as they are running terrible in Direct X 12 at the moment with the AMD 290's are eclipsing them and Nvidia has just announced their new cards which are a major improvement due late May. I think it would be an expensive mistake getting a 980 as these cards are headed for the bargain bin.

If you are going Intel soon and budget is a factor I'd try and source a cheap older i5 processor as Intel has not improved a lot in years, and Skylake was a major disappointment.

pwlm
05-09-2016, 01:27 AM
Good article, thanks. I have been building my own systems since owning an AMD Thunderbird back in the early 2000's. What I find is that I tend to spend the same money on a build as I would on a pre-built machine, but I can up-spec and change parts as I go - upgrade the GPU by downgrading the motherboard if I don't want to overclock the CPU, or put a better cooler in and get a case with better airflow.

There's so much information online with respect to building your own machine. In Oz (and I'm sure almost anywhere) a PC shop will install the PC and cooler to the motherboard free of charge, if you buy through that shop. The rest of the parts are easy to install, and eventually a novice will build confidence in what goes with what, which manufacturers they prefer etc.

Plenty of good websites for build assistance as well. Whirlpool and OCAU tend to be looked at as a wealth of information and it's not scary to ask, we've all been there for the first time at some stage!

E-A-X
05-09-2016, 03:00 PM
It depends on your situation. If you are looking at Direct X 12 titles and happy to overclock than the fx8350 will keep up with anything thrown at it (including Rise of the Tomb Raider) as long as you have adequate cooling.

Well even than still intel performs best in DX12 scenarios, real benefits are more likely for AMD GPU's.
The extra costs for a solid CPU cooling system for overclocking AMD's FX processors are usually that high that you could have easily bought an i5 for it running more than solid on a stock cooler and mostly also offers overclocking with ease

from what ive seen so far directx 12 kinda seems useless these days and expecting it to happen and become great is like the same some years ago with AMD Mantle - DX12 at the moment more likely looks like a crap rescue service for CPUs that really struggle in performance such as AMD's entire FX series.

another thing is the current compability, it will take a dang long time to make enough people directx 12 ready.
Not every1 is willing to switch to a broken/spamy/buggy windows 10 and spending the money for compatible graphicscard.
At that means there will be directx 11 games for a very long time on market and as long as only amd gpus or bad processors have a real benefit from it, its very unlikely to happen that there will be a wide range of DX12 games, especially because it costs alot of money to make games compatible for several directx versions.

theres plenty of games even like battlefield 4 that have a much higher and especially much more stable framerates on intel setups, so its not really worth going for any CPU from AMD at the moment - at alot of games even an 100 bucks i3 outperforms an FX 8350 easily.

Ive had a Phenom 2 1090T (2010) and upgraded towards FX 6300 (2012) and later FX 8350 (2013) - and apart from the phenom those FX processors really perform poorly at any game, they have so many chokepoints in their architecture that overclocking these is no fun at all.

SF_LostBoy
05-09-2016, 07:20 PM
Honestly do yourself a favour and ditch the AMD cpu, they really aren't work their money, intel CPU's are miles better.

Now now, don't overexacurate it. The only thing Intel is better at is the single thread handling. Overal AMD is jsut doign as good as Intel CPU's these days.


It depends on your situation. If you are looking at Direct X 12 titles and happy to overclock than the fx8350 will keep up with anything thrown at it (including Rise of the Tomb Raider) as long as you have adequate cooling. There are a few poorly optimised single core titles that may struggle more with an AMD system though. I'm dead happy with the mileage I have got out of my 8320FX@4.5Ghz and the bang for buck smokes anything Intel have on offer (it cost me $130!!!!!!!!), though I would wait till later in the year if possible as AMD Zen is coming. It could be an incredibly game changer if previews are to be believed.

However, I wouldn't be getting an Nvidia 980 as they are running terrible in Direct X 12 at the moment with the AMD 290's are eclipsing them and Nvidia has just announced their new cards which are a major improvement due late May. I think it would be an expensive mistake getting a 980 as these cards are headed for the bargain bin.

If you are going Intel soon and budget is a factor I'd try and source a cheap older i5 processor as Intel has not improved a lot in years, and Skylake was a major disappointment.

Which Intel series would you recommend me to pick from?

MERCY-Ysatis
05-10-2016, 08:45 AM
Now now, don't overexacurate it. The only thing Intel is better at is the single thread handling. Overal AMD is jsut doign as good as Intel CPU's these days.



Which Intel series would you recommend me to pick from?

I'm using FX8350 Stock Speed + Asrock 990FX Extreme 9 with 7970 Lightning BE crossfire and 16GB Ram compared to my brother-in-law which is 4690k Stock Speed + Asus Sabertooth with GTX970 Strix SLI 16GB Ram. Except for 20 secs faster load speed on opening The Division, I dont see any difference. My Rig is like 4yrs old and he just build his last year.:rolleyes:

I wanted to build a new rig but i couldn't find any reason to... If possible just wait till AMD Zen and see the performance.

SF_LostBoy
05-10-2016, 03:10 PM
I'm using FX8350 Stock Speed + Asrock 990FX Extreme 9 with 7970 Lightning BE crossfire and 16GB Ram compared to my brother-in-law which is 4690k Stock Speed + Asus Sabertooth with GTX970 Strix SLI 16GB Ram. Except for 20 secs faster load speed on opening The Division, I dont see any difference. My Rig is like 4yrs old and he just build his last year.:rolleyes:

I wanted to build a new rig but i couldn't find any reason to... If possible just wait till AMD Zen and see the performance.

AMD zen might take some time. I might actually do this:

Keep from current pc:
- MSI Radeon R9 380 2GD5T OC (wait for the next video cards to be released)
- Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO
- Seasonic M12II Evo 620W
- Crucial BX100 250GB

Buy for upgrade:
- Intel Core i7-6700 Boxed
- Gigabyte GA-B150-HD3P (B type since i'm not overclocking)
- WD Blue WD10EZEX, 1TB
- Kingston HyperX Fury HX426C15FBK2/16
- Cooler Master HAF 912 Advanced


Since Intel is better of with single thread handling and i want to record video gameplay. So it would be more efficient. Also using less energy and saving on the heathing problems.

Hackeberry1
05-11-2016, 11:31 AM
Build your own PC is the best u can doo , because every part u build in the PC is an (i don`t know how i can say this )
Unikat ok this sounds stupid i mean u go to the shop or Online and buy these Parts for the PC sometimes u stand Hours
in the shop and thinks take this Grafikcard or this ,need i too 100% 20 GB Ram or doo 16 GB Ram the job for the first time
whitch DDR i`ve need DDR2 or DDR3 ,whitch Motherboard i buy , and what for a CPU i take buy i a Intel I6 or an AMD FX six
core Processor , whitch CPU Cooler and whitch Powersupply i take got the Powersupply enough Power for all the components
i build inside or doo the PC nothing when i start it the first time or at the first start every parts i build in taking fire becouse too
much power. Or i take the Easy Way and Buy me a PreBuild PC? For the 3/4 of the money ( i need to buy all parts singel )

I build my PC self and put a lot of money in these PC OK somethimes i think why so much but than my friends come to me and
ask me did`t u know why my PC is not so good than your`s ? Or how didt my PC not start i buy it 2 hours bevor in a Shop ?
And at these moments i knew why i put a lot of money and time into build my own PC because i know what i build in and who
are the problem is, and when i say too him change the battery from the motherboard he call me an idiot and call an Repairservice
Man and he change the battery and Simsalabim the PC goes and i smile and tell him I`ve got it tell you.

But what i whant too say normaly " when u whant Build your own PC and got no plan about the Technik how it goes or u got 2 left hands
than buy an PC sleep a night over these selfmade or buy or collect informations how it goes before u whant build a own PC than when u
build your own PC and u didn`t know how and didn`t have a plan about this than i musst say too 99% when u start it the first time than u
can thake the money for the parts and Burn it or trow it out the window "

But every musst change for him self can i doo this or be i`am later a Ticuana Slumloard

But my meaning is nothing is better than a selfmade PC

( Sorry for my bad english hope u all understand what i mean )

Have fun at Playing and don`t be angry when somewhone is bette and kill u because it whas an cheater than Bann him his rest of his live

Nice greetings HackeBerry Don ps.: Ubisoft thank`s for 1000 of houers of fun and thears and sometimes agression a verry verry BIG THANX

jcbaha13
05-20-2016, 02:45 PM
i like this topic , and i hope i can build a new computer for gaming i try to save money last 6 month and i save 400 $ only that's not enough to get a GPU :rolleyes: , what can you do if your wage is 300$ per month :(

I focus on picking a processor and future Expansion.for the board. So to lower build cost at start, if RAM is 32G max I settle for say 16G at 1st build. Save $$ at start.
Optical Drive I go lower mid-range, @ 50-100 gets a good starter drive/burner.
Then shop sales, watch online over a week or two. I get paid 1 time a mo. I know if price ends on payday buy then, usually can see a week or more for future sales see price drop wait. Also learn alot about Products and quality this way. .
Also try to get on VIP list with supplier/manufactures I did with logitech @ 4 years back and totally by accident, bought a damaged box item and got "VIP Status" as a bonus. (damage= none! $150 speakers delivered for $60 still using 4 years later).
The best offer as VIP a $200 steering wheel game controller VIP only price $45. Damn I was broke on that.
Start with a cheaper but Functional case. A few months later buy the flashing lights and steam whistle version.
1 months after first run I spend my $200 and get the faster RAM go to board limit . or jump to 32G , if a 64G limit , expand over a couple months doinga 4 slot RAM consider buing 2 slots at a time. Get alot at $200 if you have a good base unit.
Start with a smaller but decent size hard drive. Get the super size/fast as expansion later.
Components make a build affordable. upgrades at $200-$300 a month after first build is done, and Heck a year later "Super Gamer" is done . Fancy case, max RAM, PCI SSD, Blue ray dual layer R-RW , etc..
The bonous to this is during expansion you get the bugs worked out of the OPS system. always takes a while.
Then add some top game controllers and who knows what else. I see for the costfo @ $2000 over a 12 month period .... the birth of a $4000+ game rig like no other.
Because its yours.
Hope this helps. Just dont skimp on the cooling , video card last. focus on the amount of shaders. more shaders on card the better. have seen less video Ram kick on more Ram because "MORE SHADERS= BEST QUALITY AND PREFORMANCE" GOOD LUCK
The worst part of budget building is looking at everything and not enough of the pieces to make it run yet. I tried hiding them in a closet. Didn't help

Opius_11
06-05-2016, 06:03 PM
Kinda funny having a "Build your PC thread" as Ubisoft doesn't manage to publish any good PC games!

Gr3y0n3
06-07-2016, 09:03 PM
wouldn't buy a kit for RAM / one product considered for service, so one RAM goes down - you have to get to service WHOLE kit... so basically all those 2x/4x are not best choice
Personally playing Division on medium usually, also can run on high (did tried out, but fps bit higher on med ) with i5-4690 / 8gb ram/ R9 280 3Gb (originally. recently replaced to R9 380 4Gb due to GPU failure) / Intel SSD 180 Gb and 1Tb WD Black = costed bit less than 1000 EUR - and pretty happy with it....

pix1865
10-31-2017, 05:19 PM
It helps us lot thanks for sharing...you can also refer gaming pc building (http://gamingpcguru.com/how-to-build-gaming-pc-step-by-step-gaming-pc-building-guide) Please check it...