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MrOblongo
08-08-2004, 01:46 PM
Hmm, im just wondering is there any way to see how much G-Force is sustaining a plane while turning. Its me or many planes make 9G turns without blackouts (Yaks,Biplanes). Just that, just wondering how much G-Force can a plane sustain and how much is produced in the tight turnings.

MrOblongo
08-08-2004, 01:46 PM
Hmm, im just wondering is there any way to see how much G-Force is sustaining a plane while turning. Its me or many planes make 9G turns without blackouts (Yaks,Biplanes). Just that, just wondering how much G-Force can a plane sustain and how much is produced in the tight turnings.

Tully__
08-08-2004, 01:54 PM
In a constant speed turn with constant stick deflection:

a = V^2 / r

where a = acceleration, V = speed and r = radius of turn. You also need to factor in gravity, as that changes the turn radius in vertical turns (loops) and changes the G on the pilot in horizontal turns.

Most (undamaged) fighter aircraft of WW2 and later vintage can take more G than the pilots can.

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TX-EcoDragon
08-08-2004, 03:28 PM
Perhaps a way that is a bit easier to implement in the game is to fly a P-47, YP-80 etc which have a G-Meter on the panel.

There are some rules about G loadings in level flight that you can keep in mind also. As bank angle increases the amount of G's required to maintain the vertical component of lift (ie no change in altitude) increase dramatically:
-At 45 degree bank angle with no increase or decrease in altitude the aircraft and pilot will experience +1.41 G's,

-At 60 degrees of bank it the laod factor will be 2 Gs.

-3Gs occurs just beyond 70 degrees of bank.

-4 Gs is only at about 75 degrees of bank.
after that any increases in bank angle will produce very high G loadings. Note that to add an additional unit of G only took about 4.8 degrees of bank increase at this high bank angle.

Now if the aircraft is un-coordinated these values will go up or down somewhat, if tehy pilot is climbing or descending they will as well. . .but this is somthing that you can keep in mind when flying in the sim.

Also, check out these threads for a little more info:

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?q=Y&a=tpc&s=400102&f=63110913&m=984106453&p=1


http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?q=Y&a=tpc&s=400102&f=94610606&m=100105982&p=1

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MrOblongo
08-08-2004, 04:16 PM
Thanks a lot for the replys.
Now, is a pilot able to resist constant turnings like what we see in Multiplayer, should the black out be more often than that we have?.

Just asking, im very intrigated about this topic

IL2-chuter
08-08-2004, 05:40 PM
Another factor is the speed (time) the G-forces are developed. A pilot can take a lot more G's that come on smoothly than G's that come on much more quickly. For instance, smoothly (though maybe briskly) pulling into a tight turn a pilot might be able to take (arbitrarily) 6.5 G's but if he is not anticipating an instantanious 2.0 G's he will likely pass out.


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hamselv2
08-08-2004, 05:50 PM
G-forces (and a lot of other data) can be read during offline flying from one of the pieces of devicelink-software provided by LeadSpitter in the topic posted 01-08-04 11:03

http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?a=tpc&s=400102&f=23110283&m=602105085

TX-EcoDragon
08-09-2004, 12:34 AM
There are things that a pilot can do who is anticipating the force to increase their tolerance (M-1/L-1 straining maneuver), but high rates of onset allow for greater maximal G values than do lower rates of onset.

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