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View Full Version : Arno, the Frye Twins & Assassin Councils (Some Spoilers)



Bipolar Matt
12-29-2015, 04:26 PM
In Unity, Arno was (for a time, at least), expelled from the French Assassin Brotherhood for, as the ruling council told him, pursuing targets without sanction, "flouting the Assassin's Creed" and pursuing a personal vendetta.

Eighty years later, Jacob and Evie blatantly defied the British Assassin Council by going to London, pursuing targets without sanction and pursuing a personal agenda. Further, Jacob's actions nearly resulted in the crashing of British currency, major issues with public transportation, counterfeit elixirs (soothing syrup) and the whole episode with Maxwell Roth.

While they accomplished what the council could only dream of in London, they blatantly defied the council and, Jacob at least, caused a lot of chaos along the way.

Hypocrisy in how the respective councils treated Arno and Jacob/Evie?

cawatrooper9
12-29-2015, 07:23 PM
Maybe. Maybe the London/British Brotherhood is a little more lenient than the French, or they have softened over time. Lots of different factors, I guess.

EaglePrince25
12-30-2015, 03:44 PM
Yeah I don't really think you can expect different Brotherhoods (Or Rites in the case of the Templars) to operate exactly the same, as different people will naturally sit on each and therefore have different things they'll let slide. Heck, before Unity the different Brotherhoods never even had Councils at all.

CrossedEagle
12-30-2015, 06:11 PM
My headcanon is around the time of the Enlightenment the Assassins wanted to be more democratic, so they started having Assassin Councils. They all varied in effectiveness, but they've been around since the Great Purge.

melbye82
12-31-2015, 03:15 AM
The difference as i see it is that did what he did for himself order be damned, while Evie and Jacob while not sanctioned did what they thought was the best course of action for the assassins

Bipolar Matt
12-31-2015, 05:52 AM
I dunno. I thought differing councils or not, they'd at least have a uniform, agreed upon code of conduct that spanned all brotherhoods worldwide.

I enjoyed both Arno and Jacob (and Evie), but for different reasons, and I understood the motivations of both of them. I liked how neither were supermen. They were both ordinary guys thrust into extraordinary events.

Namikaze_17
12-31-2015, 06:28 AM
It's also possible that the Brotherhood perhaps underwent through such a state of fear and oppression towards the Templars, that they saw the twins' attempt as utter suicide. So yeah they most likely were in trouble, but was anyone going to come down to London and tell them that? - haha, nope.

You also have to consider that the industrial age is the supposed "downfall" for the Assassins -- even more so with the 20th century around the corner; so even comparing it with Arno's situation is explainable in the sense that times simply changed, and so too did the Brotherhood.

Bipolar Matt
12-31-2015, 06:33 AM
It's also possible that the Brotherhood perhaps underwent through such a state of fear and oppression towards the Templars, that they saw the twins' attempt as utter suicide. So yeah they most likely were in trouble, but was anyone going to come down to London and tell them that? - haha, nope.

You also have to consider that the industrial age is the supposed "downfall" for the Assassins -- even more so with the 20th century around the corner; so even comparing it with Arno's situation is explainable in the sense that times simply changed, and so too did the Brotherhood.

Well-written response. Thank you.