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XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 03:38 PM
Major Siegfried Freytag
Thu Oct 23 22:09:28 2003
80.164.87.79

Major
Freytag, Siegfried
* 10.11.1919 Danzig-Langfuhr
+ 02.06.2003 Marseille / Frankreich
Ritterkreuz am: 03.07.1942
als: Oberleutnant
Funktion: Flugzeugf√ľhrer I./JG 77
Bes. Vermerke: Nach dem Krieg in der franz. Fremdenlegion.

Siegfried Freytag, der Stern von Malta, was born in 1919. He joined the JG77 where he achieved his first kill on 13.7.41 in Russia, a Mig-3. One year later he had achieved 57 kills at the Eastern front and was moved to the Mediterrainiens. Here he participated in the battle of Malta and shot down 20 Spitfires. It is said, that he had to bail out into open sea near an english vessel and was about to be captured by an english boat. But was picked out of the "Bach" by an D0-24 in the last minute. Then the 77 was moved to Tunesia, where they were replacing the JG27. Promoted as wing-commander (Kommandeur) of the I./ JG77 they fought the long retreat back through Sicily and Italy in 43-44, where he was badly wounded first by an P-38 on July 12. 1943, and later on 29.1.44 due strafing Spitfires at his homebase. Like so many other veterans at this time he was burned out, and in September 44 , with 99 kills to his credit, the JG77 was re-drawn to refreshment and taken into Reichsverteidigung. After Operation Bodenplatte, where he achieved his last victory, a Spifire and his 102 kill, he was transfered to JG 7 where he flew the new ME 262. Late in March he was promoted as Kommodore of the JG51, but he never showed up in his new post. Frytag flew 878 missions and was awarded with the RK. After the war he joined the French Legion as an infantrist, and it is believed that he still is alive some where in the south of France. Steinhoff, his CO in Afrika once said about him: "He was nervous like a racehorse, but a dream of a pilot..."




Message Edited on 10/24/03‚ 02:52PM by Freiberg1

Message Edited on 10/24/0303:46PM by Freiberg1

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 03:38 PM
Major Siegfried Freytag
Thu Oct 23 22:09:28 2003
80.164.87.79

Major
Freytag, Siegfried
* 10.11.1919 Danzig-Langfuhr
+ 02.06.2003 Marseille / Frankreich
Ritterkreuz am: 03.07.1942
als: Oberleutnant
Funktion: Flugzeugf√ľhrer I./JG 77
Bes. Vermerke: Nach dem Krieg in der franz. Fremdenlegion.

Siegfried Freytag, der Stern von Malta, was born in 1919. He joined the JG77 where he achieved his first kill on 13.7.41 in Russia, a Mig-3. One year later he had achieved 57 kills at the Eastern front and was moved to the Mediterrainiens. Here he participated in the battle of Malta and shot down 20 Spitfires. It is said, that he had to bail out into open sea near an english vessel and was about to be captured by an english boat. But was picked out of the "Bach" by an D0-24 in the last minute. Then the 77 was moved to Tunesia, where they were replacing the JG27. Promoted as wing-commander (Kommandeur) of the I./ JG77 they fought the long retreat back through Sicily and Italy in 43-44, where he was badly wounded first by an P-38 on July 12. 1943, and later on 29.1.44 due strafing Spitfires at his homebase. Like so many other veterans at this time he was burned out, and in September 44 , with 99 kills to his credit, the JG77 was re-drawn to refreshment and taken into Reichsverteidigung. After Operation Bodenplatte, where he achieved his last victory, a Spifire and his 102 kill, he was transfered to JG 7 where he flew the new ME 262. Late in March he was promoted as Kommodore of the JG51, but he never showed up in his new post. Frytag flew 878 missions and was awarded with the RK. After the war he joined the French Legion as an infantrist, and it is believed that he still is alive some where in the south of France. Steinhoff, his CO in Afrika once said about him: "He was nervous like a racehorse, but a dream of a pilot..."




Message Edited on 10/24/03‚ 02:52PM by Freiberg1

Message Edited on 10/24/0303:46PM by Freiberg1

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 03:47 PM
Freiberg!,

Thanks for posting a very interesting item. I never really understood how many Germans went into the Foreign Legion after the war until I read Bernard Fall's book STREET WITHOUT JOY (highly recommended BTW). Many German WW2 veterans ended up fighting for more years in Indo-China under the French flag.

And, with a hat off to the French, whatever they did not suffer in WW2, they suffered during the endless Indo-China war against the Viet Minh.


Blutarski

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:00 PM
Great post

<center>http://www.freewebs.com/leadspitter/LS1.txt
Good dogfighters bring ammo home, Great ones don't. (c) Leadspitter</center>

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:03 PM
BLUTARSKI wrote:
- And, with a hat off to the French, whatever they did
- not suffer in WW2, they suffered during the endless
- Indo-China war against the Viet Minh.

What the hell are you talking about? The french suffered furing the whole length of the war. You think it's a walk in the park to be occupied by nazis?

My grandfather fought throughout the whole war first in France and then in Africa until he was disabled and then continued as an instructor until the end.


Nic

Edited the idiot part in case I misunderstood.





Message Edited on 10/24/0305:14PM by nicolas10

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:04 PM
btw RIP Freytag.

Nic



Message Edited on 10/24/0305:04PM by nicolas10

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:06 PM
nicolas10 wrote:
- BLUTARSKI wrote:
-- And, with a hat off to the French, whatever they did
-- not suffer in WW2, they suffered during the endless
-- Indo-China war against the Viet Minh.
-
- What the hell are you talking about idiot? The
- french suffered furing the whole length of the war.
- You think it's a walk in the park to be occupied by
- nazis?

Nicolas, I think you misunderstood Blutarski's point by some 180dgr...

Ruy "SPADES" Horta
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhorta
-----------------------------
Il-2 - VEF JG 77
-----------------------------
'95-02 - WB Jagdgeschwader 53
'99-00 - DoA Jagdstaffel 18
-----------------------------
The rest is history...

http:\\www.xs4all.nl\~rhorta\brother.jpg

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:11 PM
Nic-Cool off before you have a stroke. You misunderstood the man. Do you want some prozac too. Might mellow you out a little. Some of you guys are awfully high strung.

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:19 PM
nicolas10 wrote:
- BLUTARSKI wrote:
-- And, with a hat off to the French, whatever they did
-- not suffer in WW2, they suffered during the endless
-- Indo-China war against the Viet Minh.
-
- What the hell are you talking about idiot? The
- french suffered furing the whole length of the war.
- You think it's a walk in the park to be occupied by
- nazis?
-
- My grandfather fought throughout the whole war first
- in France and then in Africa until he was disabled
- and then continued as an instructor until the end.
-
- Keep your idiotic comments for yourself.
-
- Nic
-

If you cant read and comprehend English, I recommend NOT posting insults. Especially to a comment praising the French.

Blutarski said whatever they DIDNT suffer in WWII, (meaning they suffered SO VERY MUCH), but ON TOP OF THAT, they even suffered in Indo-China. He was praising the French. You owe him an appology. (Your Quote: What the hell are you talking about idiot?) Applies to your post only. And you should practice what you preach - (Your Quote: Keep your idiotic comments for yourself.)

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 04:23 PM
Applogies to blutarski, I misunderstood the whatever comment for "what".

Nic

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 05:07 PM
nicolas10 wrote:
- BLUTARSKI wrote:
-- And, with a hat off to the French, whatever they did
-- not suffer in WW2, they suffered during the endless
-- Indo-China war against the Viet Minh.
-
- What the hell are you talking about? The french
- suffered furing the whole length of the war. You
- think it's a walk in the park to be occupied by
- nazis?
-
- My grandfather fought throughout the whole war first
- in France and then in Africa until he was disabled
- and then continued as an instructor until the end.
-
-
- Nic
-
- Edited the idiot part in case I misunderstood.


Nic,

No disrespect intended! Just referred to the comments of Bernard Fall who pointed out that the relative losses suffered by France during the Indo-China War were FAR greater than those suffered during WW2. Have you read the book? It was a great eye-opener for me.

Your father has my hat off too, as a man who fought on, even when his homeland had been overrun and conquered. That took equal parts faith and courage in the face of greatest adversity.



Blutarski

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 06:56 PM
I haven't read the book.

And yes I have the utmost respect for my grandfather actions. After being captured in 1940 because shortage of ammo, he escaped from german camps and managed to rejoin North Africa through Germany, occupied France and Spain.

I guess I'm overly sensitive of the French bashing.

Nic

XyZspineZyX
10-24-2003, 07:24 PM
nicolas10 wrote:
- I haven't read the book.

..... I highly recommend STREET WITHOUT JOY and consider it a classic of military history literature. You won't be able to out it down once you start reading. Fall was a great writer (even in translation) and observer (he was there on the scene at the time). Fall was later killed in RVN in 1967 while still working as a war correspondent. His other book HELL IN A VERY SMALL PLACE is equally as good and remains to this day probably the best general reference source on the Battle of Dien Bien Phu.


- I guess I'm overly sensitive of the French bashing.

You won't see any from me. I have relatives in Marseilles and Lyon.



Blutarski