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Waldo.Pepper
08-27-2004, 03:06 AM
The Japanese were the prime exponents of air-to-air bombing during the Second World War, and went so far as to develop a series of weapons specially for this purpose. The flrst of these was the Type 99 No 3 Mark 3, which entered service in 1939 and weighed 83 pounds. It was shaped like a normal bomb except that it had offset tailfins to rotate it after release, and thus arm the clockwork tail fuse. When the bomb detonated, explosive charges at the centre and rear of the weapon blew outwards and forwards the 144 phosphorus incendiery pellets carried inside the casing. The bomb was effective out to about 75 Yards bcneath the point of detonation. A heavier weapon along the same lines was the Type 2 No 3 Mark I, which weighed 551 pounds and was introduced in 1942; it carried 759 incendiary pellets, and was effective to about 200 yards beneath the point of detonation. Finally, at the end of the war, tests were in progress with the Type 5 No 25 Mark 29 bomb which weighed 551 pounds and contained 102 pounds of phosphorus incendiary material 1100 pellets. This bomb could be released in the normal way or, if the pilot was one of the Banzai breed, he could plunge into the enemy formation and at the flick of a switch blow up his aircraft, himself and hopefully, one or two of the enemy.


I know Oleg and co. are worlking on these I just hope it they are done 'right' (whatever that is).


From World War Two Fighter Combat by alfred Price. Pages 94-95.

Waldo.Pepper
08-27-2004, 03:06 AM
The Japanese were the prime exponents of air-to-air bombing during the Second World War, and went so far as to develop a series of weapons specially for this purpose. The flrst of these was the Type 99 No 3 Mark 3, which entered service in 1939 and weighed 83 pounds. It was shaped like a normal bomb except that it had offset tailfins to rotate it after release, and thus arm the clockwork tail fuse. When the bomb detonated, explosive charges at the centre and rear of the weapon blew outwards and forwards the 144 phosphorus incendiery pellets carried inside the casing. The bomb was effective out to about 75 Yards bcneath the point of detonation. A heavier weapon along the same lines was the Type 2 No 3 Mark I, which weighed 551 pounds and was introduced in 1942; it carried 759 incendiary pellets, and was effective to about 200 yards beneath the point of detonation. Finally, at the end of the war, tests were in progress with the Type 5 No 25 Mark 29 bomb which weighed 551 pounds and contained 102 pounds of phosphorus incendiary material 1100 pellets. This bomb could be released in the normal way or, if the pilot was one of the Banzai breed, he could plunge into the enemy formation and at the flick of a switch blow up his aircraft, himself and hopefully, one or two of the enemy.


I know Oleg and co. are worlking on these I just hope it they are done 'right' (whatever that is).


From World War Two Fighter Combat by alfred Price. Pages 94-95.