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View Full Version : Aichi B7A "Ryusei" / "Grace"



DIRTY-MAC
06-04-2004, 05:01 PM
http://modelingmadness.com/scotts/axis/j/fujgracebt.jpg

The Ryusei (known as Shooting Star to the West) failed to apprehend a potential in the Japanese air force. This was due to delayed development and the increasingly shaky industry situation from 1944. The Ryusei was designed to a 1941 specification for a high performance multirole aircraft which was to supplement and the replace the Nakajima B6N torpedo bomber and the Yokosuka D4Y dive bomber.

http://wmilitary.neurok.ru/wwii/b7a.gif

admirable performance
With the Allied name of Grace, the B7A fulfilled the requirement well, with performance similar to the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, with a maximum speed similar to the latter, a high rate of climb and unsurpassable manoeuvrability which matched many fighters, even though this aircraft was relatively large in size. The prototype was first flown in May 1942, with nine pre-production test and evaluation airframes being built. By the time the Ryusei entered service in 1944, after delays with the Nakajima Homare engine, the majority of the Japanese aircraft carriers had been sunk, air supremacy had been lost and most of the Japanese industry had been and was continued to be bombed heavily.

http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/IJARG/images/b7a2-1.jpg

production
Only 105 aircraft were built of the production variant, the B7A2, built by the parent company (80), and the Omura Naval Air Arsenal (25). This tallied up a grand total of just 114 aicraft. Only two Kikotais were equipped with the aircraft, and of the few B7A2's built, only a few entered service or saw action in home waters, occasionally being encountered by the Allies over the last few months of the Pacific War.

mother nature
Amongst all the American bombers interrupting the production of the aircraft in Japan, it was an earthquake which completely stopped production. The earthquake destroyed the Aichi Funakata plant in May 1945. This meant that the proposed B7A3 version, which was an improved version with uprated 2,000hp (1,491kW) engines, was never built, even though it was planned.

specification
country of origin: Japan

type: Two seat carrier borne torpedo and dive bomber

powerplant
B7A1 - one 1,800hp (1,350kW) Nakajima NK9B Homare 11 18-cylinder radial; four bladed propeller

B7A2 - one 1,825hp (1,368kW) NK9C Homare 12

dimensions
Wingspan: 14.40 metres (47 feet 3 inches)

Length: 11.49 metres (37 feet 8 inches)

Height: 4.08 metres (13 feet 4 inches)

weights
Empty: 3,810kg (8,400lb)

Normal Loaded: 5,700kg (12,568lb)

Maximum Loaded: 6,500kg (14,330lb)

armament
One 800kg (1,764lb) torpedo or equivalent bombs; two 20mm cannon in wings, one 7.92mm or 13mm machine gun in rear cockpit

performance
B7A2 - Maximum Speed: 352mph (566km/h) at 6,550 metres (21,490 feet)

Time to 4,000 metres (13,120 feet): 6.9 minutes

Service Ceiling: 8,950 metres (29,365 feet)

Range with Full Load: 1,150 miles (1,850 kilometres)

Maximum Range: 1,888 miles (3,036 kilometres)

operator: Japan

production
9 B7A1

105 B7A2

Total: 114

http://www.simviation.com/pageimages/b7a2.gif

DIRTY-MAC
06-04-2004, 05:01 PM
http://modelingmadness.com/scotts/axis/j/fujgracebt.jpg

The Ryusei (known as Shooting Star to the West) failed to apprehend a potential in the Japanese air force. This was due to delayed development and the increasingly shaky industry situation from 1944. The Ryusei was designed to a 1941 specification for a high performance multirole aircraft which was to supplement and the replace the Nakajima B6N torpedo bomber and the Yokosuka D4Y dive bomber.

http://wmilitary.neurok.ru/wwii/b7a.gif

admirable performance
With the Allied name of Grace, the B7A fulfilled the requirement well, with performance similar to the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, with a maximum speed similar to the latter, a high rate of climb and unsurpassable manoeuvrability which matched many fighters, even though this aircraft was relatively large in size. The prototype was first flown in May 1942, with nine pre-production test and evaluation airframes being built. By the time the Ryusei entered service in 1944, after delays with the Nakajima Homare engine, the majority of the Japanese aircraft carriers had been sunk, air supremacy had been lost and most of the Japanese industry had been and was continued to be bombed heavily.

http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/IJARG/images/b7a2-1.jpg

production
Only 105 aircraft were built of the production variant, the B7A2, built by the parent company (80), and the Omura Naval Air Arsenal (25). This tallied up a grand total of just 114 aicraft. Only two Kikotais were equipped with the aircraft, and of the few B7A2's built, only a few entered service or saw action in home waters, occasionally being encountered by the Allies over the last few months of the Pacific War.

mother nature
Amongst all the American bombers interrupting the production of the aircraft in Japan, it was an earthquake which completely stopped production. The earthquake destroyed the Aichi Funakata plant in May 1945. This meant that the proposed B7A3 version, which was an improved version with uprated 2,000hp (1,491kW) engines, was never built, even though it was planned.

specification
country of origin: Japan

type: Two seat carrier borne torpedo and dive bomber

powerplant
B7A1 - one 1,800hp (1,350kW) Nakajima NK9B Homare 11 18-cylinder radial; four bladed propeller

B7A2 - one 1,825hp (1,368kW) NK9C Homare 12

dimensions
Wingspan: 14.40 metres (47 feet 3 inches)

Length: 11.49 metres (37 feet 8 inches)

Height: 4.08 metres (13 feet 4 inches)

weights
Empty: 3,810kg (8,400lb)

Normal Loaded: 5,700kg (12,568lb)

Maximum Loaded: 6,500kg (14,330lb)

armament
One 800kg (1,764lb) torpedo or equivalent bombs; two 20mm cannon in wings, one 7.92mm or 13mm machine gun in rear cockpit

performance
B7A2 - Maximum Speed: 352mph (566km/h) at 6,550 metres (21,490 feet)

Time to 4,000 metres (13,120 feet): 6.9 minutes

Service Ceiling: 8,950 metres (29,365 feet)

Range with Full Load: 1,150 miles (1,850 kilometres)

Maximum Range: 1,888 miles (3,036 kilometres)

operator: Japan

production
9 B7A1

105 B7A2

Total: 114

http://www.simviation.com/pageimages/b7a2.gif