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View Full Version : Compression?



XyZspineZyX
08-18-2003, 02:56 PM
Comression / compressability... I've seen very little of it on either side, in any plane, and that seems odd.

To steal a post from another thread:
*****************
Aircraft speed plays a factor too. Quote about Zero's maneuverability form Japanese ace Saburo Sakai:

"(On the Zero's maneuverability)
Oh yes, the Zero was incredibly maneuverable, but not over about 250 mph. Above that speed, the stick just gets too heavy because the plane's control surfaces are so huge. You've seen those films of kamikaze plunging straight down into the water far from any U.S. ships, right? The kids in those planes probably put their planes into a dive way too early, and before they realized their mistake, they had too much speed built up to pull out of their dive. They probably died pulling desperately on the stick with all their strength. When I coached those kids [kamikaze pilots], I'd tell them, "If you've gotta die, you at least want to hit your target, right? If so, then go in low, skimming the water. Don't dive on your target. You lose control in a dive. You risk getting picked off by a fighter, but you've got better chance of hitting your target."
******************

We routinely pull out of 600-700kph dives in all sorts of planes, both axis and allied. Neither side has an advantage, both sides can do it. My question is, should we be able to? I don't think so.

S!
OG_Vorlin

XyZspineZyX
08-18-2003, 02:56 PM
Comression / compressability... I've seen very little of it on either side, in any plane, and that seems odd.

To steal a post from another thread:
*****************
Aircraft speed plays a factor too. Quote about Zero's maneuverability form Japanese ace Saburo Sakai:

"(On the Zero's maneuverability)
Oh yes, the Zero was incredibly maneuverable, but not over about 250 mph. Above that speed, the stick just gets too heavy because the plane's control surfaces are so huge. You've seen those films of kamikaze plunging straight down into the water far from any U.S. ships, right? The kids in those planes probably put their planes into a dive way too early, and before they realized their mistake, they had too much speed built up to pull out of their dive. They probably died pulling desperately on the stick with all their strength. When I coached those kids [kamikaze pilots], I'd tell them, "If you've gotta die, you at least want to hit your target, right? If so, then go in low, skimming the water. Don't dive on your target. You lose control in a dive. You risk getting picked off by a fighter, but you've got better chance of hitting your target."
******************

We routinely pull out of 600-700kph dives in all sorts of planes, both axis and allied. Neither side has an advantage, both sides can do it. My question is, should we be able to? I don't think so.

S!
OG_Vorlin

XyZspineZyX
08-18-2003, 08:52 PM
As far as I know, it is not modelled in any way. Pity as it would add to realism.

http://www.stormbirds.com/warbirds/header.jpg


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XyZspineZyX
08-19-2003, 03:04 AM
Take a ride in the B1 rocket, overspeed and have a taste!

XyZspineZyX
08-19-2003, 06:07 AM
Try P-47 at high alt. At high speeds stick is almost useless.

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