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XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 02:08 AM
Recently I wrote to MR. Shamus Reddin, a rocket expert and webmaster of excelent site about the Walter Rocket engines( http://www.walter-rockets.i12.com/), about this.

"Do you have some information about the possibility to the pilot cut off the engine and than restart it ? Could this be considered a normal procedure to keep the low fuel suply and use the excelent glide 163 ability?
Was it safe and usual?"

Check his answer:

"Hi,

Many thanks for your kind comments about my web site.

In answer to your question, the Me.163 pilot had two choices in flight. He could shut off the motor, or throttle back to idling.
Pilots did both, and both were not unusual. Both were safe - or as safe as it could be, when using the dangerous fuels (there were a number of explosions when Me.163s were tested and started on the ground, so it was not without risk, but as safe as on the ground).

Throttling back the engine was the best option. It saved fuel, but gave an option to open up the throttle for extra power. The fuel flow control valves were robust and efficient, and the pilot could open the throttle fairly swiftly, usually without causing engine problems.

Starting the engine in flight was possible - but not easy. The throttle needed to be opened slightly and the starting button pressed at the same time - in flight this might need two hands, leaving nothing to hold the control column. The pilot needed to watch the revs build up to the correct level, before feeding the throttle up to power levels. In a combat area paying all this attention to the engine controls would be dangerous.

I would say that in most recorded combats the pilot would keep the power on until all the fuel is used up - using the power for climbing to height and then high speed firing passes. When fuel was all gone, with height, more attacks could be made; without height, the gliding performance of the Me.163 could allow the pilot to dive away. I don't think keeping a fuel reserve would be good practice - the fuel would need to be dumped before landing anyway, or the landing would be very dangerous.

To be honest, there were not enough combat flights for pilots to be able to develop a good combat strategy, so I think that each pilot did the easiest or safest thing at the time, and with only six minutes fuel, there would not be much left after a climb to height anyway.

I hope that this reply has been useful.
If you have any further comments please write to me again, or I can pass your e-mail to other colleagues for their comments.
Regards,

Shamus."


For additional evidence, check the interview with Mr.Opitz, Komet Test pilot, about a sucessful restart. http://www.flightjournal.com/articles/me163/me163_4.asp

Hope this could help to bring to live again, with justice, this amazing plane,pilots and groundstaff.

Regards,
JG400 W.Spate

XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 02:08 AM
Recently I wrote to MR. Shamus Reddin, a rocket expert and webmaster of excelent site about the Walter Rocket engines( http://www.walter-rockets.i12.com/), about this.

"Do you have some information about the possibility to the pilot cut off the engine and than restart it ? Could this be considered a normal procedure to keep the low fuel suply and use the excelent glide 163 ability?
Was it safe and usual?"

Check his answer:

"Hi,

Many thanks for your kind comments about my web site.

In answer to your question, the Me.163 pilot had two choices in flight. He could shut off the motor, or throttle back to idling.
Pilots did both, and both were not unusual. Both were safe - or as safe as it could be, when using the dangerous fuels (there were a number of explosions when Me.163s were tested and started on the ground, so it was not without risk, but as safe as on the ground).

Throttling back the engine was the best option. It saved fuel, but gave an option to open up the throttle for extra power. The fuel flow control valves were robust and efficient, and the pilot could open the throttle fairly swiftly, usually without causing engine problems.

Starting the engine in flight was possible - but not easy. The throttle needed to be opened slightly and the starting button pressed at the same time - in flight this might need two hands, leaving nothing to hold the control column. The pilot needed to watch the revs build up to the correct level, before feeding the throttle up to power levels. In a combat area paying all this attention to the engine controls would be dangerous.

I would say that in most recorded combats the pilot would keep the power on until all the fuel is used up - using the power for climbing to height and then high speed firing passes. When fuel was all gone, with height, more attacks could be made; without height, the gliding performance of the Me.163 could allow the pilot to dive away. I don't think keeping a fuel reserve would be good practice - the fuel would need to be dumped before landing anyway, or the landing would be very dangerous.

To be honest, there were not enough combat flights for pilots to be able to develop a good combat strategy, so I think that each pilot did the easiest or safest thing at the time, and with only six minutes fuel, there would not be much left after a climb to height anyway.

I hope that this reply has been useful.
If you have any further comments please write to me again, or I can pass your e-mail to other colleagues for their comments.
Regards,

Shamus."


For additional evidence, check the interview with Mr.Opitz, Komet Test pilot, about a sucessful restart. http://www.flightjournal.com/articles/me163/me163_4.asp

Hope this could help to bring to live again, with justice, this amazing plane,pilots and groundstaff.

Regards,
JG400 W.Spate

XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 02:13 AM
Cool info. I wonder if Oleg knows this....

47|FC
http://rangerring.com/wwii/p-47.jpg

XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 08:12 PM
"revs" Rev's of what? It's a rocket.

Also it's a little strange that the engine required "starting" as the fuels exploded when they contacted each other. The service module engine in the Apollo worked the same way to make it simpler and more reliable.

7./JG26_HarryM

XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 08:14 PM
Hmm, maybe the fuel pump "turbine" is what he's talking about.

7./JG26_HarryM

XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 08:32 PM
This is excellent info, thanks. I was familiar with the site but somehow I did not see this answer. The fact that Me-163 engine could be stopped and restarted in flight in safety is a very important aspect.

It is also important to mention that Me-163B engine had three thrust settings: 1630kg (1500kg at sea level), 500kg(400kg SL) and 100kg, with the following fuel consumptions: 8.1kg/s, 3.2kg/s and 1.5kg/s respectively.

At altitude it cruises with 900km/h with the second throttle setting.

I hope that we'll see a as closer to reality as possible flight model for Me-163, but I'm not putting my hopes too high. FB flight model has an obvious limitation that effectively cripples the performance of rocket powered interceptors: fuel cantity for all planes has only 5 steps - full, 3/4, 1/2, 1/4 and empty. With this restriction you cannot simulate the enourmous variation in climb rate and acceleration that Me-163 had as the fuel was consumed. For example climb rate varied from 50m/s at take-off on sea level and full fuel to 150m/s at high altitude and low fuel. I don't see how will they model this continuous variation with the stepped fuel consumption model.

But let's hope that at least the times for fuel consumption will be right, even if performance will be in steps.Unfortunately right now Bi-1's fuel consumption is erroneous.


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Message Edited on 10/16/0302:42PM by Huckebein_FW

XyZspineZyX
10-16-2003, 10:22 PM
Harry_M wrote:
- "revs" Rev's of what? It's a rocket.
-


'To start the Me163 expose the the Starter Button then press and hold for 4 or 5 seconds until the turbine tachometer reads 40-50% and the engine is firing.'

This is where the revs come in, it is the the revs of the turbine.

Cheers!

<CENTER>


<IMG SRC="http://www.apqa16.dsl.pipex.com/airplane1.3.jpg"


Ladies & gentlemen, this is the captain speaking. Thankyou for choosing to fly Mandarin Airlines. Those passengers sitting on the left-hand side of the aeroplane please make yourselves comfortable. Those sitting on the right... please look to your left!

XyZspineZyX
10-18-2003, 02:12 AM
"Wie ein Floh.
Aber ohO!"

a very good interview of Komet test pilot:
http://www.flightjournal.com/articles/me163/me163_1.asp

XyZspineZyX
10-18-2003, 02:23 AM
nevermind. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif




Message Edited on 10/18/0301:24AM by ladoga