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adriatic
02-19-2004, 03:08 PM
I'm just wondering about letters on compass...
Only in German airplanes is difference- O (ost) for E (east).
All another nations have N-E-S-W. (And Russian and Japanese).

Woos this in reality or it is just maked simple for us in IL-2?

And what difference is in IL-2 for European,Russian,American or Japanese release?

About compass I expected Cyrillic in Russian and Chinese symbol in Japan cockpits...

I don't know nothing about history, but I found out that now and not before ICAO
(International Civil Aviation Organisation-UN) gave order that English have to be
standard international language for radio telecommunication from year 2008.

This Have nothing with my question but have meaked me wonder.....

adriatic
02-19-2004, 03:08 PM
I'm just wondering about letters on compass...
Only in German airplanes is difference- O (ost) for E (east).
All another nations have N-E-S-W. (And Russian and Japanese).

Woos this in reality or it is just maked simple for us in IL-2?

And what difference is in IL-2 for European,Russian,American or Japanese release?

About compass I expected Cyrillic in Russian and Chinese symbol in Japan cockpits...

I don't know nothing about history, but I found out that now and not before ICAO
(International Civil Aviation Organisation-UN) gave order that English have to be
standard international language for radio telecommunication from year 2008.

This Have nothing with my question but have meaked me wonder.....

Chuck_Older
02-19-2004, 03:13 PM
I'm pretty sure that in Japanese aircraft, the instrumentation would be in Japanese, not Chinese http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I mean, centuries of strife had not made them the best of friends by the 1930s.

The only Chinese aircraft from this period I can recall is a pre-war pursuit plane based heavily on a Seversky design, I think (Seversky became Republic)

*****************************
from the Hundred Years war to the Crimea, from the lance and the musket and the Roman spear, to all of the men who have stood with no fear, in the service of the King~ Clash

BfHeFwMe
02-19-2004, 04:08 PM
Might have been a carry over from nautical usage. Pretty sure shipping and naval vessels would have a standard convention for international navigation. Be kind of hard to pull in a busy port and have the local pilot unable to use your instruments to help keep your ship off the rocks. Since there's a strong aviation link with the Navy in most nations it would have carried over. Note how Germany was an exception to the naval tie.

adriatic
02-20-2004, 07:53 AM
OK... Sorry Chuck_Older for my ignorance about symbol letters. I thought they be derived from China. Like you write in Latin, and who knows from where you are...

horseback
02-21-2004, 01:54 AM
Japanese and Chinese both use the same pictograph symbols system - it has been in use for quite some time in both lands. The Japanese also use a phonetic system called Kanji, which are sometimes used as modifiers for the pictographs.

As for the near universal use of Latin letters for compasses, the nautical tradition (borrowed from Britain) might account for it on Japanese a/c, but it is just as likely that as a precision instrument, aviation specialized 'spirit' compasses (I think they used an alcohol for the liquid filling) may have had only a few manufacturers, and the Soviets may not have been able to maintain a domestic supplier.

Cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

adriatic
02-21-2004, 02:10 PM
Thank's all.!