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TwoCrows
01-15-2004, 05:29 PM
My tendency is to fly (offline) in campaigns featuring early war settings. Thankfully, FB has supplied the equipment and maps sufficient to emulate the deeds of many heroes from many countrys in desperate times of struggle.

I have found a persona to fly under the name of (with all due humility).

From a web site I will supply the link to soon (as well as some others).


JOS”į MAR√¬ćA BRAVO

Born on 8th April 1917, the young Jos√© Mar√¬*a Bravo received a good general education from the Free Education Institution. He quickly became fluent in French and German and was an accomplished sportsman. In early 1936 he was preparing for a hard-to-obtain place at the Civl Engineering School, having spent two years studying the exact sciences.

When the war started he had already had initial contact with aviation from his gliding activities at the OcaŮa Popular Aero Club. At the end of 1936 he decided to respond to the call for pilots at Los Alc√°zares. He went to Russia with the so-called First Kirovabad Course at the end of December 1936. There he did a course on the I-15 (Chato/Snub-nose) and I-16 (Mosca/Fly). He returned to Spain in June 1937.

He began flying with No 1 Sqn, which had Russian pilots, on the Mosca. In December his exceptional capabilities in combat and as a leader resulted in his becoming 2 i/c of the sqn, with Claud√¬*n as C.O. At that time Mosca pilots zeroed their machine guns to converge at 400 metres, but Bravo got his armourer to set his up at 100 metres. On 31st May 1938 he was promoted to captain, and at the start of the Battle of the Ebro he was C.O. of No 3 Sqn. He was appointed 2 i/c 21st Fighter Group (Moscas) on 27th August, with Zarauza as C.O. Tarazona took over his command of No 3 Sqn, known as Double Six. This squadron claimed the highest number of shootdowns of the campaign - ten to Bravo. During this frenetic time he flew more than four sorties a day.

After the Catalonia campaign, with nearly all the Republican fighters lost, he went to France on 6th February 1939, along with the remaining pilots and mechanics.

As far as the Republic was concerned, it was all over. They were interned in the Argelés concentration camp.
During the Spanish war he had flown 1,100 hours on all the fighter types operated by the Republican Air Force in 1,920 flights of which 1,120 were combat sorties, mainly on Moscas CM-193 and CM-249.
He was involved in 160 dogfights and shot down 23 enemy aircraft. He never had to use his parachute.
After his return from the Soviet Union in June 1937, he was continually active. At the age of barely 22 he was about to be promoted to Major. After a spell in the French internment camp he set off at the first opportunity for the Soviet Union, where he took up studying engineering.

When war was declared on Nazi Germany he joined the Red Army in a sapper unit operating at great risk behind the German lines. A chance meeting with a Soviet general who had fought in Spain led to the approximately 50 Spanish pilots dispersed in various units joining the Air Defence Air Force, the P.V.O. Bravo was encharged with drawing up a list of them. He was posted to the crucial Baku oil fields, where he was a squadron commander together with captain Zarauza, who died shortly afterwards in an unfortunate accident.

He flew the latest marks of I-16 as well as the Spitfire, Kittyhawk, Hurricane and Aircobra.

On the sudden demobilisation of the Spanish pilots in 1948 he held the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was on a Staff course at the time. In all this time he had added 630 flying hours during the Second World War.
After leaving the Soviet Air Force he worked in the Moscow Pedagogical Language School, where he was made vice-dean. In 1960, after a great deal of hassle, he obtained permission to return to Spain, where he was reunited with his family.
For his activities in the Spanish War, his resolute character, his powers of command and his experience he was regarded by Republican aircrew as one of their most charismatic and respected fighter pilots.


What a wonderful thing it would be to be able to fly This career, to be This hero, to fly Those planes?

Let's see... what would we need?

.... a map?

TwoCrows
01-15-2004, 05:29 PM
My tendency is to fly (offline) in campaigns featuring early war settings. Thankfully, FB has supplied the equipment and maps sufficient to emulate the deeds of many heroes from many countrys in desperate times of struggle.

I have found a persona to fly under the name of (with all due humility).

From a web site I will supply the link to soon (as well as some others).


JOS”į MAR√¬ćA BRAVO

Born on 8th April 1917, the young Jos√© Mar√¬*a Bravo received a good general education from the Free Education Institution. He quickly became fluent in French and German and was an accomplished sportsman. In early 1936 he was preparing for a hard-to-obtain place at the Civl Engineering School, having spent two years studying the exact sciences.

When the war started he had already had initial contact with aviation from his gliding activities at the OcaŮa Popular Aero Club. At the end of 1936 he decided to respond to the call for pilots at Los Alc√°zares. He went to Russia with the so-called First Kirovabad Course at the end of December 1936. There he did a course on the I-15 (Chato/Snub-nose) and I-16 (Mosca/Fly). He returned to Spain in June 1937.

He began flying with No 1 Sqn, which had Russian pilots, on the Mosca. In December his exceptional capabilities in combat and as a leader resulted in his becoming 2 i/c of the sqn, with Claud√¬*n as C.O. At that time Mosca pilots zeroed their machine guns to converge at 400 metres, but Bravo got his armourer to set his up at 100 metres. On 31st May 1938 he was promoted to captain, and at the start of the Battle of the Ebro he was C.O. of No 3 Sqn. He was appointed 2 i/c 21st Fighter Group (Moscas) on 27th August, with Zarauza as C.O. Tarazona took over his command of No 3 Sqn, known as Double Six. This squadron claimed the highest number of shootdowns of the campaign - ten to Bravo. During this frenetic time he flew more than four sorties a day.

After the Catalonia campaign, with nearly all the Republican fighters lost, he went to France on 6th February 1939, along with the remaining pilots and mechanics.

As far as the Republic was concerned, it was all over. They were interned in the Argelés concentration camp.
During the Spanish war he had flown 1,100 hours on all the fighter types operated by the Republican Air Force in 1,920 flights of which 1,120 were combat sorties, mainly on Moscas CM-193 and CM-249.
He was involved in 160 dogfights and shot down 23 enemy aircraft. He never had to use his parachute.
After his return from the Soviet Union in June 1937, he was continually active. At the age of barely 22 he was about to be promoted to Major. After a spell in the French internment camp he set off at the first opportunity for the Soviet Union, where he took up studying engineering.

When war was declared on Nazi Germany he joined the Red Army in a sapper unit operating at great risk behind the German lines. A chance meeting with a Soviet general who had fought in Spain led to the approximately 50 Spanish pilots dispersed in various units joining the Air Defence Air Force, the P.V.O. Bravo was encharged with drawing up a list of them. He was posted to the crucial Baku oil fields, where he was a squadron commander together with captain Zarauza, who died shortly afterwards in an unfortunate accident.

He flew the latest marks of I-16 as well as the Spitfire, Kittyhawk, Hurricane and Aircobra.

On the sudden demobilisation of the Spanish pilots in 1948 he held the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was on a Staff course at the time. In all this time he had added 630 flying hours during the Second World War.
After leaving the Soviet Air Force he worked in the Moscow Pedagogical Language School, where he was made vice-dean. In 1960, after a great deal of hassle, he obtained permission to return to Spain, where he was reunited with his family.
For his activities in the Spanish War, his resolute character, his powers of command and his experience he was regarded by Republican aircrew as one of their most charismatic and respected fighter pilots.


What a wonderful thing it would be to be able to fly This career, to be This hero, to fly Those planes?

Let's see... what would we need?

.... a map?

guderian_ente
01-16-2004, 10:41 AM
I am with you! We would definitely need a map, and then some of these:

http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/drnash/model/spain/did.html

Minimum, IMHO:

I-16 Type 5, 6, and/or 10 (10 is the "Super Mosca")
I-15
Bf-109 B, C, D, and/or E
He-51
Hs-123
Fiat CR-32
SB-2
Do-17 or He-111 early
Ju-52 early

And, just because it's cool:

Boeing P-26 Peashooter

http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/speccoll/visfront/imagemed/victoriam.jpg

DuxCorvan
01-16-2004, 01:05 PM
And...

Hispano Ni.62
Br. XIX
- these upper two on both sides at beginning of SCW
I-152
Hawker Spanish Fury
He 112
Potez 54
Grumman FF-1
Polikarpov R-5 (also great for East Front)
DC-2...

Uggg, we'll never have'em... http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

- Dux Corvan -
http://www.uploadit.org/DuxCorvan/Altamira2.jpg
Ten thousand years of Cantabrian skinning.

guderian_ente
01-16-2004, 02:22 PM
According to the link I posted the I-152 arrived at the very end of the conflict, and it's "doubtful whether the I-15bis aircraft saw any active service".

Here's a good overview of the types most used (form the Spanish Air War mod for EAW):

http://home.austarnet.com.au/burchell/SAWhome/Blank9.htm

http://home.austarnet.com.au/burchell/SAWhome/Brief%20History.htm

Based on that I'd add the Savoia-Marchetti SM-81 bomber-transport, the Meridionali Ro-37bis recon plane, and possibly also the SM-79 bomber to the list of essential aircraft. All were important types with the [I]Aviazione Legionara, which was the less well known but equally important Spanish equivalent to the Condor Legion. Assorted biplanes can also be added to the Republican side, and several of these are already on your list.

TwoCrows
01-16-2004, 02:36 PM
http://boozers.fortunecity.com/lolos/226/pilotos.htm

http://www.aire.org/gce/

Here are a couple more links re the Spanish Civil War. Galland and Molders are included in the Nationalist role. I have more somewhere which include many more Soviet pilots and will post them as I stumble across.

Those years were very interesting not only as a prelude to WW2 but also as a chronicle of one nations struggle.

Dux,
Love the art... Alta Mira?

Guderian_ente... great site showing the range of interesting aircraft. Can you imagine flying a Staggerwing Beech?

DuxCorvan
01-17-2004, 02:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TwoCrows:
Dux,
Love the art... Alta Mira?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, main hall in Altamira Cave, Santillana, Spain. I was born very near. There's a big hall whose ceiling is covered with two-color paintings of harts and ancient European bisons. They were painted ca. 12000 BC, and are, along with Lascaux pictures in South France, among the most beautiful and naturalistic animal pics of all times.

The man who discovered them in the late 19th century, Marcelino S√°enz de Sautuola was from Santander, my hometown. He was looking for stone tools when his little daughter told him: 'Dad, there are bulls painted here'. He was scorned and despised as a scientist when he defended the pics had been made by prehistoric man. They even accused him of having painted them himself. After he died, Breuil discovered the caves in South France, and the famous scientists that had despised him had to apologize. Even the respected Cartailhac published an article: 'Paintings in Altamira, Spain. Mea culpa of a sceptical'.

To see and know more:

http://www.cantabriainter.net/cantabria/lugares/cuevasaltamira.htm

P.S.: If you ever go there, visit the village near. Santillana del Mar is a piece of art itself.

End of O.T. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

- Dux Corvan -
http://www.uploadit.org/DuxCorvan/Altamira2.jpg
Ten thousand years of Cantabrian skinning.

[This message was edited by DuxCorvan on Sat January 17 2004 at 02:00 AM.]

TUCKIE.JG52
08-08-2005, 12:33 PM
Bump! Open your eyes!

jeroen_R90S
08-09-2005, 11:19 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TwoCrows:
Dux,
Love the art... Alta Mira? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, main hall in Altamira Cave, Santillana, Spain. I was born very near. There's a big hall whose ceiling is covered with two-color paintings of harts and ancient European bisons. They were painted ca. 12000 BC, and are, along with Lascaux pictures in South France, among the most beautiful and naturalistic animal pics of all times.

The man who discovered them in the late 19th century, Marcelino S√°enz de Sautuola was from Santander, my hometown. He was looking for stone tools when his little daughter told him: 'Dad, there are bulls painted here'. He was scorned and despised as a scientist when he defended the pics had been made by prehistoric man. They even accused him of having painted them himself. After he died, Breuil discovered the caves in South France, and the famous scientists that had despised him had to apologize. Even the respected Cartailhac published an article: 'Paintings in Altamira, Spain. Mea culpa of a sceptical'.

To see and know more:

http://www.cantabriainter.net/cantabria/lugares/cuevasaltamira.htm

P.S.: If you ever go there, visit the village near. Santillana del Mar is a piece of art itself.

End of O.T. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

- Dux Corvan -
http://www.uploadit.org/DuxCorvan/Altamira2.jpg
Ten thousand years of Cantabrian skinning.

[This message was edited by DuxCorvan on Sat January 17 2004 at 02:00 AM.] </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks for the tips; another destination added to an already extending list of trips... My camper, the poor old lady, will have to make overtime!

Jeroen