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View Full Version : Why is Machiavelli an Assassin?



Defalt221
03-04-2015, 11:36 AM
He believed that all people are inherently evil when given freedom. So that means his ideals are to restrict freedom to bring peace. But if that's true then why did he join the Assassin order? Does that mean La Volpe was right that he is secretly a Templar?

Xangr8
03-04-2015, 01:20 PM
And I remember reading it somewhere that according to historical records, Machiavelli supported the Borgias. Weird.

VestigialLlama4
03-04-2015, 03:03 PM
He believed that all people are inherently evil when given freedom. So that means his ideals are to restrict freedom to bring peace. But if that's true then why did he join the Assassin order? Does that mean La Volpe was right that he is secretly a Templar?

A lot of Machiavelli's reputation is based on misreadings of THE PRINCE, he's been highly misunderstood. Machiavelli was a Republican, someone who wanted Florence to stop relying on mercenary armies, he built a popular army in Florence and resisted an invasion by neighboring countries, he also dreamed of nascent Italian nationalism and wondered how Italy could be unified into a single nation. Comparing the real Machiavelli's ideas to modern notions is hard, because definitions have shifted and that in the medieval era, even people who idealized City States accepted that a Republic could only be governed over a small area of land and not a full nation (they felt monarchy would serve that purpose). The fact that Machiavelli believed that a Republic was still better than a Kingdom as he stated in his books is fairly modern.

As for why Machiavelli is an Assassin and not a Templar, Machiavelli pointed out repeatedly in The Prince that no one can govern over the people or establish order without popular support. He pointed out that a group of nobility can never be relied on to rule and that a leader's real source of power came from bottom up, rather than top down. That's fairly anti-Templar.

Of course the real reason why Machiavelli is an Assassin and not a Templar is that he's cool. All the cool historical figures are Assassins or Assassin-Allies, while the Templars scratch at the bottom of the barrel (with the exception of Copernicus who was a Templar for a Day and a Half before he saw how evil they are).


And I remember reading it somewhere that according to historical records, Machiavelli supported the Borgias.

Machiavelli didn't support the Borgias nor did he oppose them. He served as an Ambassador for Florence, which meant he was outside observer, neither for or against them. In The Prince, he wrote of the Borgia from the point of view of Cesare's failed attempt to unify Italy and as a case study on where he was successful and where he wasn't successful. He famously wrote of Pope Alexander VI that he "never saw a man he did not try to decieve" and says he was a good politician, which is not exactly a complement.