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watteville
02-17-2004, 06:40 AM
I am curious as to what views you use during a fight.

As a glider pilot who often flies with 2, 3 sometimes more gliders in a tight thermal I realise that in very crowded areas my head/eyes, always had that same instinctive movement; In a glance, I check glider #1 for attitude, heading, speed, rate of turn then bring my sights back to my hood and horizon, check glider #2 then bring myself back to my hood and horizon.

That back and forth paning allows me to check the position of everyone and anticipate where myself, #1 or #2 will be in 3-4 seconds it also allows me to ensure that my craft attitude is normal.

In very tight crowded flights I pan this way constantly and if I don't see my contact an alarm bell goes off and I usually end up exiting the thermal and reentering it one revolution later.

these 2 views are in my mind the most important views in dogfighting as it allows the pilot to be aware of the position and movements of his "bandits" but also be aware of the good attitude of one's craft.

I find that "ennemy view from cockpit" is missing and it is a shame.

Sure one can use padlock but it only works when the bandit is in one field of view and as soon as I go back to cockpit view and try to re-padlock it doesn't work because that bandit is now out of my field of view. Plus I don't like having a fluorescent triangle on my target.

I end up using F-6 padlock ennemy air and have gotten used to it. flying F-1, F-6 constantly.

We really need a new in cockpit padlock that simply turns the head of the pilot towards its closest target; (simply puts it dead screen center) without brakets or triangle, press it once more and it goes to the next target and so on. It should be a fast head turn pan and mimic the movements of a real head. one could also incorporate a way to get the target out of canopy bars as if the pilot was moving it's head for a better view.


I am curious as to what views you are using during a fight.

[This message was edited by watteville on Tue February 17 2004 at 06:28 AM.]

watteville
02-17-2004, 06:40 AM
I am curious as to what views you use during a fight.

As a glider pilot who often flies with 2, 3 sometimes more gliders in a tight thermal I realise that in very crowded areas my head/eyes, always had that same instinctive movement; In a glance, I check glider #1 for attitude, heading, speed, rate of turn then bring my sights back to my hood and horizon, check glider #2 then bring myself back to my hood and horizon.

That back and forth paning allows me to check the position of everyone and anticipate where myself, #1 or #2 will be in 3-4 seconds it also allows me to ensure that my craft attitude is normal.

In very tight crowded flights I pan this way constantly and if I don't see my contact an alarm bell goes off and I usually end up exiting the thermal and reentering it one revolution later.

these 2 views are in my mind the most important views in dogfighting as it allows the pilot to be aware of the position and movements of his "bandits" but also be aware of the good attitude of one's craft.

I find that "ennemy view from cockpit" is missing and it is a shame.

Sure one can use padlock but it only works when the bandit is in one field of view and as soon as I go back to cockpit view and try to re-padlock it doesn't work because that bandit is now out of my field of view. Plus I don't like having a fluorescent triangle on my target.

I end up using F-6 padlock ennemy air and have gotten used to it. flying F-1, F-6 constantly.

We really need a new in cockpit padlock that simply turns the head of the pilot towards its closest target; (simply puts it dead screen center) without brakets or triangle, press it once more and it goes to the next target and so on. It should be a fast head turn pan and mimic the movements of a real head. one could also incorporate a way to get the target out of canopy bars as if the pilot was moving it's head for a better view.


I am curious as to what views you are using during a fight.

[This message was edited by watteville on Tue February 17 2004 at 06:28 AM.]

T_O_A_D
02-17-2004, 06:59 AM
Not wanting to sound like a smart Arse but that pretty much why I purchased TIR. I don't like the same stuff you do, and was wanting the same things you want. So TIR filled this void short I have to find the target not the machine. Brackets or no brakets.

Have you checked your Private Topics recently? (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?a=ugtpc&s=400102)
131st_Toad's Squad link (http://www.geocities.com/vfw_131st/)
My TrackIR fix, Read the whole thread (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?q=Y&a=tpc&s=400102&f=49310655&m=15310285&p=1)
2.11 drivers (http://home.mchsi.com/~131st-vfw/NaturalPoint_trackIR_2_11.exe)
http://home.mchsi.com/~131st_vfw/T_O_A_D.jpg

JG14_Josf
02-17-2004, 08:34 AM
Gliders?

Soaring the San Bernardino mountains remain as some of my fondest memories. Hang gliders do not offer much view above so as the lower gliders bubble up; it is up to the higher gliders to get out of the way when needed.

I understand the frustration in simulation when seeing is at first awkward.

Only after the manipulation of the controls becomes automatic through practice does the player even begin to see with anything close to real life proficiency.

Take a look at the track file titled Energy game available here:

Michapma's web page (http://people.ee.ethz.ch/~chapman/il2guide/tracks.htm)

In that track file you will be able to see how the game can enable the player to see better.

I understand what it is like when seeing is difficult and I now know that seeing can be almost as natural in the game as it is in reality through practice and manipulation of the controls.

It is worth the effort in my opinion.

I do not use Track IR but if at all possible please do consider that as an option.

Gliding is similar to air combat in that both involve energy conservation, at least that is my perspective.

watteville
02-17-2004, 09:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Gliding is similar to air combat in that both involve energy conservation, at least that is my perspective.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It is incredebly similar to an air combat mission especially during a race; You are given a "mission"; generaly a 200-300 mile triangle, you are flying a high performance single seater against other gliders, most of the flight will happen at high angle of bank close to stall with many "bandits" around you "fighting" an air current that tries to eject you; you will have to put up with some very important decision in a very short time, your glider will probably drop close to 1/2 it's weight in "Ordonance" (water http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif )
if the weather turns against you your engine will be in effect "shot down" and you will have to "crash land" your glider in a field. where you will have to explain yourself to local law enforcement and fend angry farmers.

but most of all when you take off, no matter how good you are there are 1 chance in 10 that you will have to put up with some sort of emergency; Being low somewere, being lost, being late, being sucked up by a cloud or landing in cow fields.

anyway you look at it it is freakin' great and environmentally friendly. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

XyZspineZyX
02-17-2004, 10:43 AM
A hat switch is all I need.

By the way, the "cockpit sweep" you just described is a good argument FOR use of Speedbar, which some decry as a "realism kludge". The fact that you can easily glean heading alt and speed at a VERY quick glance without really taking attention off the outside world is very well simulated with Speedbar. (I feel I can still do quick checks if Speedbar isn't there, but only in planes I'm already VERY familiar with)