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View Full Version : Neat online experience...(When things seem to go your way)



SithSpeeder
05-06-2004, 09:23 AM
I would like to share a success story (one of the *few* I've had online) and a suprising feel of accomplishment. I'll start it off with the facts, but then make an attempt to make it interesting (a lame try at a narrative, if you will). Last night, online in Hyperlobby, I was in a dogfight room with only 3 or 4 on each side. I had taken off as a member of the red team, and climbed my Stang (Darby "D") to 5000m near the highest peak around, monitoring communications between the host (the leader of a different squad) who was trying to recruit a self-admitted noob flyer on the red side [Editor's Note: I'm not trying to be politically correct, but I'm not using the word 'noob' in a negative context...I consider myself a noob, btw] (he politely declined, citing his noobishness). The host convinced the noob (maybe I should say, "other" noob http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ) to fly a Stang as well because that's what they flew in their squad.

Anyways, a few minutes later, another guy joins the red side, saying he would like to join up with the host's squad (they flew together previously, methinks). At this point, the host asks both me and the noob to switch sides. The thing is, it took me 10 minutes to get to altitude and over to the border where I could see enemy approaches. I decide to ignore him. Not out of blatant disrespect, but because the fight was imminent.

The enemy was coming...at or slightly above the altitude of my teammate below me, 7 or 8 clicks out. It was after sunset and hard to see them, but I could see them from my perch. I messaged my teammate "Get some altitude, they're closing on you". He responded, "OK!" For once, I was in the driver's seat, having to assess the relative threat potential of each inbound bandit to both me and my wingman. The first bandit was a captured P-63 with German markings, and he was gaining altitude fast, trying to get at least co-altitude with me. So I began the aerial dance with him, avoiding his head on and pulling a loop and a couple high yo-yo's trying to gain the advantage. I was finally able to gain a position in his rear quarter (thank the Lord for that extra E from before the fight), and started to pepper him with my .50s. [At this point, the host again asks us to change sides http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ]

But that's when I noticed that the other bandit (a captured P-51 with German markings) had already hit my wingman below, starting a small but visible fuel leak! No time to type...I had to finish the P-63 or else I would expose my tail to a cannon shell if I just disenged and went to my wingman's aid. Luckily, my wingie did stay relatively close, and for a brief moment I was able to squeeze off a short burst at his pursuer (which was enough to scare him just for a moment, slowing down his dogged pursuit). Quickly, I re-acquired the P-63. If he hadn't been leaking and slightly damaged from my first couple of peppers, he might have turned the tables on me as my attention was diverted. But it was a worthy risk on my part.

I had to finish off that P-63, and quickly. Rolling into and on top of him, I made another guns pass...bits of his plane were flying by me, but he was still spraling down and away from me, making the guns solution difficult. Even in the dark, the ground was coming up fast. Flaps to take off position. He stalled...just briefly, but I knew the trees were about to swallow him because of it. I saluted him, he saluted back. I could feel my bird on the edge of the stall, unloaded, reversed, and followed the slope of the mountain away as the P-63 impacted the ground [Enemy Aircraft Destroyed]. Although it felt good to get the kill, it strangely wasn't that important to me. My wingman was still fighting for his life. [At this point, the host again asks us to change sides http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ]

With throttle to the wall, I went after him. Luckily, he had stayed relatively close (instead of trying to extend and run away from where I was...a typical mistake that I probably would have made http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ). Quickly, I was able to get on the enemy P-51. In the moonlight, I could just make out the white german cross on it--it was an unholy combination in my mind. But even though I always find it difficult to shoot at an American plane (including the P-63 I just downed), I knew these were captured planes and if I didn't, he would (virtually) kill my wingman.

Now either my wingman was wounded/hurt or he was smarter than I originally gave him credit (I like to think it was the latter)--he didn't do any really hard break turns as I began peppering his pursuer. This allowed me to concentrate my poor gunnery on the pursuer. In spite of being beyond my convergence settings, I was still seeing the occassional sparks on the bandit as my tracers flew into the night. The bandit's guns would light brilliantly for a moment here and there, as the he tried to dispatch my wingman so he could deal with me. But I was slowly reducing his maneuverability, piece by little piece. My wingman was streaming fuel pretty badly now, but finally, his pursuer broke off.

The bandit tried to pull a barrel roll, but I lagged behind him, transitioning to pure pursuit near the bottom of the roll to ensure I didn't lose him in the night. Then, he made the fatal mistake...a high yo-yo to try to reverse into me. Finally, all those days on the gunnery range paid off as the high deflection shot at close range was available. I opened fire...more, bigger pieces, came off his plane. I pulled up, looking over my shoulder. He was still in control it seemed. Kicking my rudder over, I hammerheaded back down in pursuit. Again, the ground was coming up quickly. I could see the fat, ugly trees (http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ) rising in the night. He pulled hard, but he wasn't gonna make it. I was in pure pursuit and realized I was about to follow him in!

BOOM--his explosion lit up my entire forward view. I was pulling hard, on the edge of stall, dropping flaps, trimming smoothly...oh, the ground was coming up FAST. I was starting to see the profiles of the trees...individual pinecones! (OK, I made that part up). The scoop on the bottom of my plane had to be sucking in leaves...I probably could have heard the slapping of the tree tops on my wings if it weren't for the loud beating of my heart. I said a silent prayer and rode the edge of the envelope. Finally, the trees started to fall away as the nose rose above the horizon. I was still alive and in one piece. Success!

And over the radio, my wingman says "Thanks, Speeder." It was strange, but that was the highlight of the whole night for me. I didn't really even care about either of the kills--I would have been happy just to drive them off (and live to tell about it). But those two little words from him spoke volumes to me. Shooting down the bandits is what I trained myself to do, but getting a simple thanks from my wingman...just brought a lump to my throat. I responded, "You're leaking pretty bad, let's return to base...I'll follow you."

Could we both make the landing in the dark, especially with him shot up? On the approach, we both realized that we were off by a good 25 degrees to the runway. [The brass was still on us though. Over the comms "Would you PLEASE switch sides to blue now? This is your last warning!" said the host. Again, not the time to be "typing".] Dropping flaps, he adjusted, his engine sputtering now. I pulled off two hard S-turns to bleed off extra energy, simultaneously dropping flaps, then dropping gear while coming out of the end of the last turn. My wingman had lined up on the taxiway and just had wheels touchdown. I followed nearly abreast of him on the main runway. Flaps up, brakes tapping, throttle back, feather prop...I was NOT going to nose over this time! Drifting momentarily off the runway, I kicked the rudder back a bit, re-centering myself on the runway. He was safely down, and so was I. A huge sigh of relief washed over me. "Good landing," I said to my wingman, "that was tough under the circumstances."

At this point, I (politely) explained why I didn't respond to his requests, citing the imminent battle, being engaged with the enemy, and being on final approach and trying not to die in the dark. I just wanted to save my wingman and finish the sortie, I told him. Mission accomplished.

I love this 'game'.

* _54th_Speeder, OUT! *

***
I love combat. I hate war. Don't ask me to explain it because I know it doesn't make sense, but that's the way it is.
--Gen. Chuck Horner, USAF, Retired.
***

http://members.cox.net/~ijhutch/_images/400x200sig.jpg

SithSpeeder
05-06-2004, 09:23 AM
I would like to share a success story (one of the *few* I've had online) and a suprising feel of accomplishment. I'll start it off with the facts, but then make an attempt to make it interesting (a lame try at a narrative, if you will). Last night, online in Hyperlobby, I was in a dogfight room with only 3 or 4 on each side. I had taken off as a member of the red team, and climbed my Stang (Darby "D") to 5000m near the highest peak around, monitoring communications between the host (the leader of a different squad) who was trying to recruit a self-admitted noob flyer on the red side [Editor's Note: I'm not trying to be politically correct, but I'm not using the word 'noob' in a negative context...I consider myself a noob, btw] (he politely declined, citing his noobishness). The host convinced the noob (maybe I should say, "other" noob http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ) to fly a Stang as well because that's what they flew in their squad.

Anyways, a few minutes later, another guy joins the red side, saying he would like to join up with the host's squad (they flew together previously, methinks). At this point, the host asks both me and the noob to switch sides. The thing is, it took me 10 minutes to get to altitude and over to the border where I could see enemy approaches. I decide to ignore him. Not out of blatant disrespect, but because the fight was imminent.

The enemy was coming...at or slightly above the altitude of my teammate below me, 7 or 8 clicks out. It was after sunset and hard to see them, but I could see them from my perch. I messaged my teammate "Get some altitude, they're closing on you". He responded, "OK!" For once, I was in the driver's seat, having to assess the relative threat potential of each inbound bandit to both me and my wingman. The first bandit was a captured P-63 with German markings, and he was gaining altitude fast, trying to get at least co-altitude with me. So I began the aerial dance with him, avoiding his head on and pulling a loop and a couple high yo-yo's trying to gain the advantage. I was finally able to gain a position in his rear quarter (thank the Lord for that extra E from before the fight), and started to pepper him with my .50s. [At this point, the host again asks us to change sides http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ]

But that's when I noticed that the other bandit (a captured P-51 with German markings) had already hit my wingman below, starting a small but visible fuel leak! No time to type...I had to finish the P-63 or else I would expose my tail to a cannon shell if I just disenged and went to my wingman's aid. Luckily, my wingie did stay relatively close, and for a brief moment I was able to squeeze off a short burst at his pursuer (which was enough to scare him just for a moment, slowing down his dogged pursuit). Quickly, I re-acquired the P-63. If he hadn't been leaking and slightly damaged from my first couple of peppers, he might have turned the tables on me as my attention was diverted. But it was a worthy risk on my part.

I had to finish off that P-63, and quickly. Rolling into and on top of him, I made another guns pass...bits of his plane were flying by me, but he was still spraling down and away from me, making the guns solution difficult. Even in the dark, the ground was coming up fast. Flaps to take off position. He stalled...just briefly, but I knew the trees were about to swallow him because of it. I saluted him, he saluted back. I could feel my bird on the edge of the stall, unloaded, reversed, and followed the slope of the mountain away as the P-63 impacted the ground [Enemy Aircraft Destroyed]. Although it felt good to get the kill, it strangely wasn't that important to me. My wingman was still fighting for his life. [At this point, the host again asks us to change sides http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ]

With throttle to the wall, I went after him. Luckily, he had stayed relatively close (instead of trying to extend and run away from where I was...a typical mistake that I probably would have made http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ). Quickly, I was able to get on the enemy P-51. In the moonlight, I could just make out the white german cross on it--it was an unholy combination in my mind. But even though I always find it difficult to shoot at an American plane (including the P-63 I just downed), I knew these were captured planes and if I didn't, he would (virtually) kill my wingman.

Now either my wingman was wounded/hurt or he was smarter than I originally gave him credit (I like to think it was the latter)--he didn't do any really hard break turns as I began peppering his pursuer. This allowed me to concentrate my poor gunnery on the pursuer. In spite of being beyond my convergence settings, I was still seeing the occassional sparks on the bandit as my tracers flew into the night. The bandit's guns would light brilliantly for a moment here and there, as the he tried to dispatch my wingman so he could deal with me. But I was slowly reducing his maneuverability, piece by little piece. My wingman was streaming fuel pretty badly now, but finally, his pursuer broke off.

The bandit tried to pull a barrel roll, but I lagged behind him, transitioning to pure pursuit near the bottom of the roll to ensure I didn't lose him in the night. Then, he made the fatal mistake...a high yo-yo to try to reverse into me. Finally, all those days on the gunnery range paid off as the high deflection shot at close range was available. I opened fire...more, bigger pieces, came off his plane. I pulled up, looking over my shoulder. He was still in control it seemed. Kicking my rudder over, I hammerheaded back down in pursuit. Again, the ground was coming up quickly. I could see the fat, ugly trees (http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ) rising in the night. He pulled hard, but he wasn't gonna make it. I was in pure pursuit and realized I was about to follow him in!

BOOM--his explosion lit up my entire forward view. I was pulling hard, on the edge of stall, dropping flaps, trimming smoothly...oh, the ground was coming up FAST. I was starting to see the profiles of the trees...individual pinecones! (OK, I made that part up). The scoop on the bottom of my plane had to be sucking in leaves...I probably could have heard the slapping of the tree tops on my wings if it weren't for the loud beating of my heart. I said a silent prayer and rode the edge of the envelope. Finally, the trees started to fall away as the nose rose above the horizon. I was still alive and in one piece. Success!

And over the radio, my wingman says "Thanks, Speeder." It was strange, but that was the highlight of the whole night for me. I didn't really even care about either of the kills--I would have been happy just to drive them off (and live to tell about it). But those two little words from him spoke volumes to me. Shooting down the bandits is what I trained myself to do, but getting a simple thanks from my wingman...just brought a lump to my throat. I responded, "You're leaking pretty bad, let's return to base...I'll follow you."

Could we both make the landing in the dark, especially with him shot up? On the approach, we both realized that we were off by a good 25 degrees to the runway. [The brass was still on us though. Over the comms "Would you PLEASE switch sides to blue now? This is your last warning!" said the host. Again, not the time to be "typing".] Dropping flaps, he adjusted, his engine sputtering now. I pulled off two hard S-turns to bleed off extra energy, simultaneously dropping flaps, then dropping gear while coming out of the end of the last turn. My wingman had lined up on the taxiway and just had wheels touchdown. I followed nearly abreast of him on the main runway. Flaps up, brakes tapping, throttle back, feather prop...I was NOT going to nose over this time! Drifting momentarily off the runway, I kicked the rudder back a bit, re-centering myself on the runway. He was safely down, and so was I. A huge sigh of relief washed over me. "Good landing," I said to my wingman, "that was tough under the circumstances."

At this point, I (politely) explained why I didn't respond to his requests, citing the imminent battle, being engaged with the enemy, and being on final approach and trying not to die in the dark. I just wanted to save my wingman and finish the sortie, I told him. Mission accomplished.

I love this 'game'.

* _54th_Speeder, OUT! *

***
I love combat. I hate war. Don't ask me to explain it because I know it doesn't make sense, but that's the way it is.
--Gen. Chuck Horner, USAF, Retired.
***

http://members.cox.net/~ijhutch/_images/400x200sig.jpg

BaldieJr
05-06-2004, 09:52 AM
Ok, but I need to know something...

How many noobs know:

hi yo yo
pure persuit
lag persuit

?????????????

http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

<pre class="ip-ubbcode-code-pre">
Specs:
More expensive than the dining set.
Less expensive than the couch.
Smaller than the dishwasher.
Just as noisy as the refridgerator.
Faster than the cars' computer.
Less practical than the car.
Face it, people who put thier computer specs in thier signature are pretty ****ing wierd.

</pre>

tsisqua
05-06-2004, 09:58 AM
Very cool story, Speeder! I wish that there were more of these types of posts. We have plenty of good writers here, if you could just get them to do it. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

BTW, it would have really SUCKED to have been kicked as you were coming in for the landing with your wingy . . . I'm glad that the host was understanding of your explaination.

Tsisqua

http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/784.gifWelcome To The Madnesshttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/784.gif

SithSpeeder
05-06-2004, 05:42 PM
Baldie--

I'm a noob flyer in FB. I have read many books on air combat, visited many websites with animated gifs, etc.--I have studied and studied to become better. I came from CFS2 (and 3, yes I admit) where I was, at best, an average flyer--more mediocre. I don't get enough stick time, though (RL interferes).

But I've been flying FB since its release and just get WAXED every time online.


To Tsisqua-- I half expected him to kick me. After my explanation, he said, "Well, go blue NOW." I thanked him politely for the game and told him I was leaving (it was 1 am). I think he cursed at me in shorthand then. Oh well.

* _54th_Speeder *

http://members.cox.net/~ijhutch/_images/400x200sig.jpg