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Thread: Al Qaeda - Iraq Connection | Forums

  1. #1
    XyZspineZyX
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    The Al Qaeda Connection, cont.
    More reason to suspect that bin Laden and Saddam may have been in league.
    by Stephen F. Hayes
    07/11/2003 5:45:00 PM

    Stephen F. Hayes, staff writer

    THE INDISPENSABLE Glenn Reynolds has linked to an article in the Nashville Tennessean written by a Tennessee judge who believes he is in possession of documents linking Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden.

    The judge is Gilbert S. Merritt, a federal appeals court judge invited to help Iraqis construct a legal system in postwar Iraq. He is, according to Reynolds, "a lifelong Democrat and a man of unimpeachable integrity."

    Here is an excerpt of his account:

    The document shows that an Iraqi intelligence officer, Abid Al-Karim Muhamed Aswod, assigned to the Iraq embassy in Pakistan, is ''responsible for the coordination of activities with the Osama bin Laden group.''

    The document shows that it was written over the signature of Uday Saddam Hussein, the son of Saddam Hussein. The story of how the document came about is as follows.

    Saddam gave Uday authority to control all press and media outlets in Iraq. Uday was the publisher of the Babylon Daily Political Newspaper.

    On the front page of the paper's four-page edition for Nov. 14, 2002, there was a picture of Osama bin Laden speaking, next to which was a picture of Saddam and his ''Revolutionary Council,'' together with stories about Israeli tanks attacking a group of Palestinians.

    On the back page was a story headlined ''List of Honor.'' In a box below the headline was ''A list of men we publish for the public.'' The lead sentence refers to a list of ''regime persons'' with their names and positions.

    The list has 600 names and titles in three columns. It contains, for example, the names of the important officials who are members of Saddam's family, such as Uday, and then other high officials, including the 55 American ''deck of cards'' Iraqi officials, some of whom have been apprehended.

    Halfway down the middle column is written: ''Abid Al-Karim Muhamed Aswod, intelligence officer responsible for the coordination of activities with the Osama bin Laden group at the Iraqi embassy in Pakistan.''

    The story Judge Merritt relates is similar to an account reported in The Weekly Standard last May. Splashed across the front page of the November 16, 2002, edition of Uday Hussein's Babil newspaper were two "honor" lists, one of which included Aswod (spelled "Aswad") and identified him as the "official in charge of regime's contacts with Osama bin Laden's group and currently the regime's representative in Pakistan."

    I stumbled upon this passage doing research for another piece. So I brought the article to the attention of administration officials, who hadn't yet seen it, and asked for comment. Intelligence analysts were perplexed, particularly because of a passage in the text preceding the list. It read: "We publish this list of great men for the sons of our great people to see." And below that: "This is a list of the henchmen of the regime. Our hands will reach them sooner or later. Woe unto them. A list of the leaders of Saddam's regime, as well as their present and previous posts."

    The second description was clearly hostile in tone--"henchmen of the regime" and "woe unto them." Analysts weren't sure what to make of the introduction or the list, but suggested Uday Hussein may have simply republished a list of "henchmen" distributed by an Iraqi opposition group without realizing he was publicly linking his father to Osama bin Laden.

    That still seems like the most plausible explanation to me. (Although Judge Merritt's report that the front page of the four-page newspaper carried side-by-side photographs of bin Laden and Saddam is interesting.) Still, some intelligence officials believe that Aswad--who publicly raised doubts after September 11 about whether Osama bin Laden is a terrorist--was an important link between Iraq and al Qaeda.

    If the newspaper reports are interesting but inconclusive, two other recent reports are more compelling. Jessica Stern, a Harvard professor and Clinton administration national security official, discusses the links in a fascinating and sober analysis of the Al Qaeda threat in the current issue of Foreign Affairs.

    Under the subheading, "Friends of Convenience," she writes:

    Meanwhile, the Bush administration's claims that al Qaeda was cooperating with the "infidel" (read: secular) Saddam Hussein while he was still in office are now also gaining support, and from a surprising source. Hamid Mir, bin Laden's "official biographer" and an analyst for al Jazeera, spent two weeks filming in Iraq during the war. Unlike most reporters, Mir wandered the country freely and was not embedded with U.S. troops. He reports that he has "personal knowledge" that one of Saddam's intelligence operatives, Farooq Hijazi, tried to contact bin Laden in Afghanistan as early as 1998. At that time, bin Laden was publicly still quite critical of the Iraqi leader, but he had become far more circumspect by November 2001, when Mir interviewed him for the third time.

    Hijazi has acknowledged meeting with al Qaeda representatives, perhaps with bin Laden himself, even before the outreach in 1998. According to news reports and interviews with intelligence officials, Hijazi met with al Qaeda leaders in Sudan in 1994.

    Former Navy Secretary John Lehman, a member of the congressional commission investigating the September 11 attacks, added to the intrigue this week when he flatly declared, "there is evidence" of Iraq-al Qaeda links. Lehman has access to classified intelligence as a member of the commission, intelligence that has convinced him the links may have been even greater than the public pronouncements of the Bush administration might suggest. "There is no doubt in my mind that [Iraq] trained them in how to prepare and deliver anthrax and to use terror weapons."

    Stephen F. Hayes is a staff writer at The Weekly Standard.
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/Conten...2/889jldct.asp

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  2. #2
    XyZspineZyX
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    The Al Qaeda Connection, cont.
    More reason to suspect that bin Laden and Saddam may have been in league.
    by Stephen F. Hayes
    07/11/2003 5:45:00 PM

    Stephen F. Hayes, staff writer

    THE INDISPENSABLE Glenn Reynolds has linked to an article in the Nashville Tennessean written by a Tennessee judge who believes he is in possession of documents linking Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden.

    The judge is Gilbert S. Merritt, a federal appeals court judge invited to help Iraqis construct a legal system in postwar Iraq. He is, according to Reynolds, "a lifelong Democrat and a man of unimpeachable integrity."

    Here is an excerpt of his account:

    The document shows that an Iraqi intelligence officer, Abid Al-Karim Muhamed Aswod, assigned to the Iraq embassy in Pakistan, is ''responsible for the coordination of activities with the Osama bin Laden group.''

    The document shows that it was written over the signature of Uday Saddam Hussein, the son of Saddam Hussein. The story of how the document came about is as follows.

    Saddam gave Uday authority to control all press and media outlets in Iraq. Uday was the publisher of the Babylon Daily Political Newspaper.

    On the front page of the paper's four-page edition for Nov. 14, 2002, there was a picture of Osama bin Laden speaking, next to which was a picture of Saddam and his ''Revolutionary Council,'' together with stories about Israeli tanks attacking a group of Palestinians.

    On the back page was a story headlined ''List of Honor.'' In a box below the headline was ''A list of men we publish for the public.'' The lead sentence refers to a list of ''regime persons'' with their names and positions.

    The list has 600 names and titles in three columns. It contains, for example, the names of the important officials who are members of Saddam's family, such as Uday, and then other high officials, including the 55 American ''deck of cards'' Iraqi officials, some of whom have been apprehended.

    Halfway down the middle column is written: ''Abid Al-Karim Muhamed Aswod, intelligence officer responsible for the coordination of activities with the Osama bin Laden group at the Iraqi embassy in Pakistan.''

    The story Judge Merritt relates is similar to an account reported in The Weekly Standard last May. Splashed across the front page of the November 16, 2002, edition of Uday Hussein's Babil newspaper were two "honor" lists, one of which included Aswod (spelled "Aswad") and identified him as the "official in charge of regime's contacts with Osama bin Laden's group and currently the regime's representative in Pakistan."

    I stumbled upon this passage doing research for another piece. So I brought the article to the attention of administration officials, who hadn't yet seen it, and asked for comment. Intelligence analysts were perplexed, particularly because of a passage in the text preceding the list. It read: "We publish this list of great men for the sons of our great people to see." And below that: "This is a list of the henchmen of the regime. Our hands will reach them sooner or later. Woe unto them. A list of the leaders of Saddam's regime, as well as their present and previous posts."

    The second description was clearly hostile in tone--"henchmen of the regime" and "woe unto them." Analysts weren't sure what to make of the introduction or the list, but suggested Uday Hussein may have simply republished a list of "henchmen" distributed by an Iraqi opposition group without realizing he was publicly linking his father to Osama bin Laden.

    That still seems like the most plausible explanation to me. (Although Judge Merritt's report that the front page of the four-page newspaper carried side-by-side photographs of bin Laden and Saddam is interesting.) Still, some intelligence officials believe that Aswad--who publicly raised doubts after September 11 about whether Osama bin Laden is a terrorist--was an important link between Iraq and al Qaeda.

    If the newspaper reports are interesting but inconclusive, two other recent reports are more compelling. Jessica Stern, a Harvard professor and Clinton administration national security official, discusses the links in a fascinating and sober analysis of the Al Qaeda threat in the current issue of Foreign Affairs.

    Under the subheading, "Friends of Convenience," she writes:

    Meanwhile, the Bush administration's claims that al Qaeda was cooperating with the "infidel" (read: secular) Saddam Hussein while he was still in office are now also gaining support, and from a surprising source. Hamid Mir, bin Laden's "official biographer" and an analyst for al Jazeera, spent two weeks filming in Iraq during the war. Unlike most reporters, Mir wandered the country freely and was not embedded with U.S. troops. He reports that he has "personal knowledge" that one of Saddam's intelligence operatives, Farooq Hijazi, tried to contact bin Laden in Afghanistan as early as 1998. At that time, bin Laden was publicly still quite critical of the Iraqi leader, but he had become far more circumspect by November 2001, when Mir interviewed him for the third time.

    Hijazi has acknowledged meeting with al Qaeda representatives, perhaps with bin Laden himself, even before the outreach in 1998. According to news reports and interviews with intelligence officials, Hijazi met with al Qaeda leaders in Sudan in 1994.

    Former Navy Secretary John Lehman, a member of the congressional commission investigating the September 11 attacks, added to the intrigue this week when he flatly declared, "there is evidence" of Iraq-al Qaeda links. Lehman has access to classified intelligence as a member of the commission, intelligence that has convinced him the links may have been even greater than the public pronouncements of the Bush administration might suggest. "There is no doubt in my mind that [Iraq] trained them in how to prepare and deliver anthrax and to use terror weapons."

    Stephen F. Hayes is a staff writer at The Weekly Standard.
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/Conten...2/889jldct.asp

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  3. #3
    XyZspineZyX
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    I don't know a lot about Hayes, but from what I know, he's a conservative writer who basically likes to attack liberals.

    Well, I guess so do I, but just pointing that out. [img]/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif[/img]

    <hr>
    --"General Hammond, request permission to beat the crap out of this man." -Col. Jack O'Neill -Stargate SG-1
    --Capt. Carter: "You think it might be a booby trap?"
    â â Teal'c: "Booby?"
    --"I'm a bomb technician, if you see me running, try to catch up" -in Russian on a bomb tech's shirt from "The Sum of All Fears"
    --"All my life, I've been waiting for someone and when I find her, she's a fish!" -Tom Hanks "Splash"
    --"War is not about who's right, it's about who's left." -Anders Russell

    Message Edited on 07/17/0303:43PM by Demon_Mustang
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  4. #4
    XyZspineZyX
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    And what does that have to do with the post? He is pointing out facts that a judge in Iraq brought to our attention. Do you think CNN would report this?

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  5. #5
    XyZspineZyX
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    EasyCo wrote:
    - And what does that have to do with the post? He is pointing out facts that a judge in Iraq brought to our attention. Do you think CNN would report this?


    Not while they can drag on and on about Laci Peterson.

    "Brave Rifles!"

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    "The spirit of the Cav is reason enough to fight!"

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  6. #6
    XyZspineZyX
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    Bah the peterson case. I don't get how come that one case gets more attention than all the other murders we have every day.

    <hr>
    --"General Hammond, request permission to beat the crap out of this man." -Col. Jack O'Neill -Stargate SG-1
    --Capt. Carter: "You think it might be a booby trap?"
    â â Teal'c: "Booby?"
    --"I'm a bomb technician, if you see me running, try to catch up" -in Russian on a bomb tech's shirt from "The Sum of All Fears"
    --"All my life, I've been waiting for someone and when I find her, she's a fish!" -Tom Hanks "Splash"
    --"War is not about who's right, it's about who's left." -Anders Russell
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  7. #7
    XyZspineZyX
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    Interesting article. I particularly liked the last bit: "Lehman has access to classified intelligence as a member of the commission, intelligence that has convinced him the links may have been even greater than the public pronouncements of the Bush administration might suggest. "There is no doubt in my mind that [Iraq] trained them in how to prepare and deliver anthrax and to use terror weapons."

    Deliver anthrax? When have A-Q ever used anthrax? A fine piece of disinformation if ever I heard some.

    Speaking of links with terrorists, how come the Pakistani Intel Officer that personnally oversaw the wiring of $100,000 to Mohammed Ata was in Washington meeting with the government on 9/11? Does this mean that the US has irrefutible links with A-Q? Would this justify the US invading itself? Watch the three clips from the 9-11 Aftermath documentry here --> ( http://gnn.tv/after_math/)

    No, but seriously, I don't think Uday mentioning an Intel Officer in a newspaper is evidence that Saddam and Osama were in bed together (although it's quite probable that they currently share an apartment).
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  8. #8
    XyZspineZyX
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    SimonMcM wrote:
    -
    - No, but seriously, I don't think Uday mentioning an
    - Intel Officer in a newspaper is evidence that Saddam
    - and Osama were in bed together (although it's quite
    - probable that they currently share an apartment).

    They will probably share one in Hell.





    <center><marquee><font color="red"><font size="2"
    <style="Verdana">"The statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting the blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception." - Mark Twain, 1917<font color="red"><font size="2" style="Verdana"><center><marquee>
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  9. #9
    XyZspineZyX
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    MisterNiceGuy wrote:
    -
    - SimonMcM wrote:
    --
    -- No, but seriously, I don't think Uday mentioning an
    -- Intel Officer in a newspaper is evidence that Saddam
    -- and Osama were in bed together (although it's quite
    -- probable that they currently share an apartment).
    -
    - They will probably share one in Hell.
    -
    Alrighty then, so we agree on something. The better just hope they dont run out of virgins by the time they arrive.

    <center>


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  10. #10
    XyZspineZyX
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    Hornet57 wrote:
    -
    - MisterNiceGuy wrote:
    --
    -- SimonMcM wrote:
    ---
    --- No, but seriously, I don't think Uday mentioning an
    --- Intel Officer in a newspaper is evidence that Saddam
    --- and Osama were in bed together (although it's quite
    --- probable that they currently share an apartment).
    --
    -- They will probably share one in Hell.
    --
    - Alrighty then, so we agree on something. The
    - better just hope they dont run out of virgins by the
    - time they arrive.

    Actually all of the virgins will be on The Second Level with me and Kimi.




    <center><marquee><font color="red"><font size="2"
    <style="Verdana">"The statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting the blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception." - Mark Twain, 1917<font color="red"><font size="2" style="Verdana"><center><marquee>
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