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  1. #1
    Member donna577's Avatar
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    O/T

    According to the pentagon, every 24hrs a service man/woman veteran of Iraq or Afganastan takes their own life. They say soon it will overcome the number of combat deaths. This troubles me, they are hero's in the eyes of the country and have had a better home coming and more support than the poor Veitnam veterans.

    Have our lifestyle/gaming given our troops a false impression on life when it comes to war? WWII veterans never had games, TV, or even a promised life. They grew up in a depression and for many of them war was an escape. Many WWII submariners joined up to escape poverty and sent much of their pay home to their families.

    I myself am proud to meet any U.S. Veteran of any war, all politics aside, they did what needed to be done. I am proud and thankful for each and every one of our people who serve in the armed forces. It's because of them that I can even post this without worrying about retribution against myself or my family.

    God bless America.
    Last edited by donna577; 06-16-2012 at 07:57 AM.
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  2. #2
    donna,

    It's sad that these lives are wasted after such an ordeal that they go through when in combat. I wonder if the fact that the economy, being in such a mess, has a role in this and is amplifying the situation.

    Your question regarding our current military and the gaming and lifestyle is a great question and when compared to earlier generations of society gives much to ponder.

    Much has changed since WW2 and today. Some of the technology that we enjoy today was first being invented then or slightly before hand. But, IMHO, I don't believe it is technology so much as it is politics. All one has to do is look at the way politics were conducted throughout history. What was and how it was taught in school then as compared to today.Government seems to be the center point. The more involved it becomes in the daily routine of people's lives the more the change will be. From the ratification of the Constitution and the freedoms that the individual enjoyed to the current government that now wants to fine you for saying a curse word or forbidding you the 32 ounce Big Gulp.

    Religion and patriotism were held in highregard back in the WW2 days. Those were values practiced and respected then. Not so much today.

    Like you, I too find the time to always shake a veteran's hand. There is nothing more rewarding than tosee that smile breakout across their face. But I also take the time to thank apolice officer/law enforcement officer for putting their uniform on and doing their jobs. To me they are just as significant in keeping the public safe and deserving of acknowledgement and appreciation.
    Last edited by Captain_Smess; 06-16-2012 at 04:08 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by donna577 View Post
    According to the pentagon, every 24hrs a service man/woman veteran of Iraq or Afganastan takes their own life.
    Actually, the numbers are even more sobering than that. At last check with various News agency statistics, a U.S. veteran commits suicide every 80 minutes. A stark reminder of the sacrifices they make, and the ghosts they continue to fight long after the battles are over. God help them.
    He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the hearts of men; yet they cannot fathom what God has done from beginning to end.
    -Ecclesiastes 3:11 (NIV84)
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  4. #4
    It's really a sad delayed casualty of wars. We work with a client here in the DC area that is chartered to improve and broaden military medicine, named for Scoop Jackson, the well known Senator from Washington. It supports both clinical and research programs, and one of their current expansion efforts is to upgrade the traumatic stress program that they co-sponsor. They recognize they need more resources to deal with the number of soldiers seeking care. Hopefully they can help, they do a lot of good work.
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    I don't remember the source, but do remember reading that the suicide rate for soldiers returning from Iraq and Afganistan is lower than that of previous wars. Thanks to programs such as LouLewis's.
    The're in their bars, drinking, celebrating our sinking! Not yet my friends, not yet!
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  6. #6
    Many WW2 vets comitted suicide after the war, a surprising many many years later at old age, I'm not sure the numbers are any higher. A good friend
    of mine son killed himself two years ago, like many put his dogtag to his head and put a bullet through tag and brain. His son left a good peaceful educated
    kid, came back changed after 3 tours,,,drinking, drugs,,,etc,,,,they found him in his truck....However, his wife left him a few months before he did it, stating he
    was a different man
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MWolfe1963 View Post
    Many WW2 vets comitted suicide after the war, a surprising many many years later at old age, I'm not sure the numbers are any higher. A good friend
    of mine son killed himself two years ago, like many put his dogtag to his head and put a bullet through tag and brain. His son left a good peaceful educated
    kid, came back changed after 3 tours,,,drinking, drugs,,,etc,,,,they found him in his truck....However, his wife left him a few months before he did it, stating he
    was a different man
    I read an interesting article in "Newsweek" magazine yesterday while waiting my turn for an MRI. The artcle was written by an Australian war correspondent after covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. His article was very poignant and sobering, covering his attempts to return to normal civilian life after several near death experiences in those countries where many of the friends he made, or colleagues he knew, where killed before his own eyes. He too was now estranged from his wife and son, and he alluded to treatments he received for PTSD from doctors. His main angst was that he feels he should not have come back alive, and that he wishes he were dead. By the end of the article, he admits that over the years, those wishes for death subsided, but he also wishes he had never taken the assignments for war corresponding.
    It was in the issue with an early picture of Queen Elizabeth on the cover, and about her coronation anniversary.
    He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the hearts of men; yet they cannot fathom what God has done from beginning to end.
    -Ecclesiastes 3:11 (NIV84)
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  8. #8
    I Just read another book on Halsey's Typhoon, several ships lost, think u know the story, but this book followed what happened to many that survived. Two ship captains
    of DD's that were lost both shot themsleves near 70 years of age. I think when men come back that changed, come home to spouses gone or give up, they just give up.
    My uncle in Korea left a wonderful man, came back changed,,,he often called out battle orders in his sleep. In one battle he lost every man in his company but one...He killed
    hundreds over there, became a drunk when home....many years later was found dead, had his uniform on, all his medal, put a bullet through his head....a very decorated combat vet.

    Being a cop you've probably seen the cop on youtube that came up against a nut combat vietnam vet, cop made some rookie mistakes, but you could see the vet go into combat mode, M1 rifle
    walking forward firing with no fear, went for cops legs and arms hitting him several times, reloaded and last shot put a bullet through his eye, you could hear cop dying.

    You've probably seen it, sad and graphic

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wf8TG...eature=related
    Last edited by MWolfe1963; 06-23-2012 at 07:53 PM.
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  9. #9
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    Haven't seen that one, but I've seen many like it, especially during training sessions. Very few police officers have training comparable to military veterans. That is, unless the cop is a vet himself. Yeah, in that video, I noticed a bad mistake right from the get-go. The officer never should have told the driver to come back to where the officer was. Not to mention a myriad of other mistakes the officer committed. I have found that often-times, a screaming, yelling cop only heightens the tension of the perpetrator. It looked to me like the offender was hit by, at least, one of the officer's bullets (he winces and flinches upon impact). I could see the veterans experience when he was "slicing the pie" while firing his weapon. Since he was apparently wounded, and on "dash-cam", I'm sure he was apprehended and is serving a life sentence w/o parole, if he even survived his wounds.

    The good news is, they always get caught:


    I don't even like watching these videos, and I NEVER watch the TV show "COPS". I don't have to watch what they do. I experience it every day. I had to go for an MRI yesterday, due to an injury I sustained while wrestling with a suspect a couple of months ago. I was also involved with assisting another department where a Desert Storm veteran had barricaded himself and his wife in their apartment, he was reportedly armed. As we arrived, my partner donned the MP5 and I grabbed the shotgun. We took positions around the house (with a lot of other cops), but fortunately, no one ended up getting hurt and the suspect surrendered. I talked with him afterwards. He was just an exhausted veteran unable to adjust to civilian life. He never wanted to harm anyone.

    He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the hearts of men; yet they cannot fathom what God has done from beginning to end.
    -Ecclesiastes 3:11 (NIV84)
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  10. #10
    Yea,that vet knowing the officer had a vest shot him in legs and arms, thus all the screams, and reloaded and finished with a head shot. I think a bad mistake to get him get back to his truck, the man had to load the gun. Sure u know better than most, u don't want to go against a rifle with a pistol. The cop got a minor hitm only grazing his stomach,,,I believe I would have run away in zigs when he came running with that rifle, but
    obvious is those events of fear, it's hard to know what u will do being shot at.
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