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Thread: Al-Gebra | Forums

  1. #1
    Senior Member RedToo's Avatar
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    Subject: School teacher arrested.

    A public school teacher was arrested today at John F.Kennedy International airport as he attempted to board a flight while in possession of a ruler, a protractor, a compass, a slide-rule and a calculator. At a morning press conference, Attorney General Eric Holder said he believes the man is a member of the notorious Al-Gebra movement.

    He did not identify the man, who has been charged by the FBI with carrying weapons of math instruction.

    ‘Al-Gebra is a problem for us’, the Attorney General said. ‘They derive solutions by means and extremes, and sometimes go off on tangents in search of absolute values.’ They use secret code names like ‘X’ and ‘Y’ and refer to themselves as ‘unknowns’, but we have determined that they belong to a common denominator of the axis of medieval with coordinates in every country. As the Greek philanderer Isosceles used to say, ‘There are 3 sides to every triangle’.

    When asked to comment on the arrest, President Obama said, ‘If God had wanted us to have better weapons of math instruction, he would have given us more fingers and toes.’ White House aides told reporters they could not recall a more intelligent or profound statement by the President – it is believed that another Nobel Prize will follow.

    RedToo.

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    I dont think its a coincidence it sounds like that ,as far as I know the Muslims were the origin of this stuff in maths ,they certainly 'thought' us westerners the decimal system which as far as I know only gained popularity after the start of the second millenium .
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    Senior Member Treetop64's Avatar
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    With all the budget cuts in education in the U.S. now, this isn't too far from reality. Public education (or lack thereof) is particularly bad here - especially in math. Private education, middle to upper-middle class public education, and post high-school education seems to hold out fairly well, despite the steadily increasing tuition rates from the latter.

    I've tutored algebra and trig at a local community college and issues with students in these subjects are what one would expect, which is to say that there is understandable apprehension until the "light" comes on. However, I've also volunteered time to tutor basic math and beginning algebra at some minority high schools, and depending on which school you go to, the attitudes from students can range between mostly ignorant to completely apathetic.
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted by ytareh:
    I dont think its a coincidence it sounds like that ,as far as I know the Muslims were the origin of this stuff in maths ,they certainly 'thought' us westerners the decimal system which as far as I know only gained popularity after the start of the second millenium .
    They also invented zero.

    Without Islamic math no one would ever have nothing
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    Senior Member AndyJWest's Avatar
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    Nothing seems to have been invented in India, according to most sources - the Moslems did however introduce nothing to Europe.

    Seriously, the 'Arabic' decimal numeric system (with at least an implicit zero) seems to have originated in India, perhaps as much as 2000 years or so ago: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakhshali_Manuscript.

    Islamic scholarship is however responsible for many advances in astronomy (note how many stars are named 'Al***'), as well as alchemy ('Al' again), which led to chemistry. They also preserved a great number of Greek texts that Christian Europe considered heresy, and worthless.

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    In restrospect, christianity has been more adaptable(or quicker) to change (westernisation) than 'eastern' religions.
    This is not to say that any religion has not recognised 'change', but how they've manipulated change to their advantage.

    In this regard Islam is seriously lacking in one major aspect - Democracy (for all it's worth), and essentially this will be it's downfall, unless it adapts.

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  8. #8
    Senior Member AndyJWest's Avatar
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    Originally posted by K_Freddie:
    In restrospect, christianity has been more adaptable(or quicker) to change (westernisation) than 'eastern' religions.
    This is not to say that any religion has not recognised 'change', but how they've manipulated change to their advantage.

    In this regard Islam is seriously lacking in one major aspect - Democracy (for all it's worth), and essentially this will be it's downfall, unless it adapts.
    Sorry, but that is highly questionable. 'Democracy' (in the contemporary Western sense, which is arguably a narrow definition) has gained the strongest hold in the European countries where Christianity has been marginalised, or at least reduced to a private concern. In Europe at least secularisation and democracy have tended to go hand-in-hand. As for Islam, I think that many recent developments in the Middle East suggest that the democratic agenda is just as strong there - though there is no reason to assume it will follow blindly on the Western path.

    Without Contraries is no progression. Attraction and Repulsion, Reason and Energy, Love and Hate, are necessary to Human existence. William Blake
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    Andy, I question whether any part of Europe has any business claiming to have the ‘strongest’ hold on democracy when most of the continent has less than 75 years of continuous democratic rule—even if we take out the Hitler conquest period.

    The United States has the claim to the strongest hold in self rule/democracy, with over 230 years of relatively stable government under the same Constitution, and it traces its democratic roots to Cromwell’s era, when Protestant thinkers started warming to <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">the concept of all men being created equal (in God’s eyes).</span> A very strong argument can be made that without the Christian Protestant movement, particularly the Calvinist/Puritan traditions, that the concept of genuine equality among human beings would have taken much longer to arrive in the general conversation, if ever.

    Without that basic concept of equality, democracy is impossible.

    The reason religion was marganilised in Europe was because the kings and rulers in Europe used it as an excuse to murder and pillage their neighbors well into the late 20th century, whereas religious tolerance as it evolved in what became the United States appears to have allowed religious belief and non violent competition in religious debate to make for a more civil society. I am not saying that this tolerance appeared immediately, or that it is complete, but I am saying that it is (and always has been) more fully realized in the US than in Europe.

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  10. #10
    Senior Member AndyJWest's Avatar
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    There are good grounds to argue that the US only became a democracy with the passing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. However, you will note I was writing about Europe in any case.

    Without Contraries is no progression. Attraction and Repulsion, Reason and Energy, Love and Hate, are necessary to Human existence. William Blake
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