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Thread: Stable Jobs | Forums

  1. #1
    Senior Member Treetop64's Avatar
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    "Stable job".

    In these times that term comes off as something of an oxymoron.

    How comfortable are you with math? Get an accounting, or any sort engineering degree, and you should compete well for practically any well-paying job.
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    AndyJWest - "Raaaid managed to get CloD to run on an NVidia 8500 GT - but then, he's Raaaid, and he is, shall we say, 'unorthodox'."
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Airmail109's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Treetop64:
    "Stable job".

    In these times that term comes off as something of an oxymoron.

    How comfortable are you with math? Get an accounting, or any sort engineering degree, and you should compete well for practically any well-paying job. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I'm good at maths. We actually do a fair bit of it on my course. Would you suggest I change degrees? I'd like to stick with mine as I'm on it now but perhaps I could pursue an MSc in Statistics or Accounting? Maybe an MSc in Medical Statistics would give me a bit of both worlds, what I enjoy and what's good for me lol. I guess that would give me the mathematics background to pursue further qualifications in finance related jobs if need be.

    Edit: It seems there is a shortage of Statisticians in the private sector and that an MSc in Medical Statistics can lead onto a PHd in pure Statistics. Awesome. That leaves me a little less anxious.
    "We are only seeking Man. We have no need of other worlds. We need mirrors. We don't know what to do with other worlds. A single world, our own, suffices us; but we can't accept it for what it is. We are seaching for an ideal image of our own world" - Solaris
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  3. #3
    Senior Member AndyJWest's Avatar
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    Are you looking for a job, or looking for an excuse to carry on studying so you don't have to get a job? A little self-reflection might help here. There is nothing much wrong with wanting to avoid working, but You'll find it easier to deal with if you at least admit to yourself that this is your goal.

    And before the "protestant work ethic" lynch-mob set off to string me up from the nearest tree, I'd like each of then to explain how their labours have had a net benefit to the health, wealth, or happiness of humankind...

    Without Contraries is no progression. Attraction and Repulsion, Reason and Energy, Love and Hate, are necessary to Human existence. William Blake
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Airmail109's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AndyJWest:
    Are you looking for a job, or looking for an excuse to carry on studying so you don't have to get a job? A little self-reflection might help here. There is nothing much wrong with wanting to avoid working, but You'll find it easier to deal with if you at least admit to yourself that this is your goal.

    And before the "protestant work ethic" lynch-mob set off to string me up from the nearest tree, I'd like each of then to explain how their labours have had a net benefit to the health, wealth, or happiness of humankind... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    You can't get a pharmaceutical job these days without an MSc. All the band 5 NHS jobs for Biomedical Scientists are going to be gone when I leave uni. Some businessman I was talking to the other day said the company he part owns is now only taking postgraduates with MBA's instead of just the graduates they took before.

    I want a job, I've had enough of not having any money. I need a plan, my girlfriends hard working and excels in her subject. I'm not in the mood to be the drunken frat boy at the end of my studies without a job or a female companion.
    "We are only seeking Man. We have no need of other worlds. We need mirrors. We don't know what to do with other worlds. A single world, our own, suffices us; but we can't accept it for what it is. We are seaching for an ideal image of our own world" - Solaris
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  5. #5
    Senior Member AndyJWest's Avatar
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    Ok, if you want a job in pharmaceuticals, then do a masters. And hope when you've finished there is still a demand. Ditto for statistics. Just don't convince yourself that you can ever qualify yourself into a secure profession - it can't be done. If it was possible to do it, everyone would do the same thing, and we'd be overwhelmed with pharmaceutical scientists or whatever. The economy doesn't work like that.

    I'd argue the best you can do is find out what you are good at, and learn how to do it better. Nobody knows what skills will be needed in a few years ahead, but whatever it is, it will involve knowing how to learn....

    Without Contraries is no progression. Attraction and Repulsion, Reason and Energy, Love and Hate, are necessary to Human existence. William Blake
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Airmail109's Avatar
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    Andy!

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/book...pinch-david-willetts

    But yes, statistics sounds like a good idea to me at the moment.
    "We are only seeking Man. We have no need of other worlds. We need mirrors. We don't know what to do with other worlds. A single world, our own, suffices us; but we can't accept it for what it is. We are seaching for an ideal image of our own world" - Solaris
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Treetop64's Avatar
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    Stats is a good way to go. Good jobs, very healthy pay, and there is a shortage of them.
    ------------------------------



    AndyJWest - "Raaaid managed to get CloD to run on an NVidia 8500 GT - but then, he's Raaaid, and he is, shall we say, 'unorthodox'."
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Pirschjaeger's Avatar
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    I tend to agree with Willetts. People are not concerned enough with their kids' futures.

    For example, Opa and Oma built up a small fortune for the family. Within a couple years of their passing it was all gone. My father had money at one time but now only has assets. But I know those assets will dwindle away to nothing by the time his life comes to an end and therefore nothing will be left to the family.

    On a daily basis I think about what I will leave for my kids. I knew years ago I'd have to start from scratch and build something for them. I also know I'll be doing this for the rest of my life.

    I hope I can teach them the importance of doing the same for their kids. Families should look at their wealth as assets that belong to the next generation.

    I'm 43 and for years I've had doubts that there will be a pension waiting for me. I know that when I pay my taxes today it is not for the future. They used to be but times have changed and my taxes are for now. If I'm to have security in the future I must create it myself. Pensions, in human society, are a new thing and already they look as though they'll fail in the near future, yours and mine.

    You might think I'm being pessimistic but I see it as being responsible. I am trying to avoid on being a burden on both yours and my kids.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member x6BL_Brando's Avatar
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    It depends how comfortable you want to be. If I had an agile mind and a desire to help humanity I would go down the "humanitarian group" route. I could give you several examples of friends and relatives who (eventually) found long-term, well-paid jobs after first giving their time and experience to Medecins sans Frontieres and helping the sick and needy in the Third world. For some it will be just an impressive entry in their CV; for others it may be a step up into the WHO or similar organisations.

    Of the friends I'm honoured to know, about four have dedicated themselves to long-term service in the World Health Organisation. One is now in charge of an entire department looking to control a world-wide disease. His wife is also a field operative in MSF and they have a fine son, born a decade-or-so ago in Delhi. In my view they have a fine life as expats of the right kind. They will be returning to the UK soon to take up residence again, after a twenty year period spent in places such as India, Tibet and Russia, helping to cure ills and teach others.

    A man or woman could die happy knowing that they had achieved such things in their lifetime.

    B
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Rjel's Avatar
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    In today's erratic economy, this is the only sure stable job.

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