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Thread: WW2 pilots and sharkattacks.(off topic) | Forums

  1. #1
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    During ww2 many ditched pilots and shipwrecked sailors were attacked by sharks (tropical seas mostly).and there seems to be about 2000 testimonys from these people.

    At that time very little was known about sharks and how to survive a shipwreck. There was an American survivalmanual for pilots and navy personel wich contained all kinds of fantasies about how to deal with sharks. Or there was no info at all.



    one suposed advice was to punch the shark and then grab and ride on its back until it got exhausted and then just cut his belly and it would die....if it didnt chicken out first when it was punched on the nose..( bcause sharks was cowards.)

    another was to make noise and splash in the water to scare them off.


    Ive heard(from an american 2002) that the modern american survivalmanual(military) has still today very little adecuate info on this subject.
    ( can anyone confirm this? )



    the info is from a rather dated book, ("The jaws of death" or "Les dents de la mort" by Xavier Maniguet 1991 ISBN91-7054-703-3 ) but I like it bcause it dsnt contain the usual hysteria and it contains very sound critisism on earlier "facts". Ive read newer books wichs seem more outdated.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    Does anyone have any info about these pilots stories or
    the american survivalmanual (1941 ?). If u do plz include a source of some kind .


    Obs!

    I dont need any info about sharks!( unless it is prehistorical sharks) just ww2 encounters with this animal.
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  2. #2
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    During ww2 many ditched pilots and shipwrecked sailors were attacked by sharks (tropical seas mostly).and there seems to be about 2000 testimonys from these people.

    At that time very little was known about sharks and how to survive a shipwreck. There was an American survivalmanual for pilots and navy personel wich contained all kinds of fantasies about how to deal with sharks. Or there was no info at all.



    one suposed advice was to punch the shark and then grab and ride on its back until it got exhausted and then just cut his belly and it would die....if it didnt chicken out first when it was punched on the nose..( bcause sharks was cowards.)

    another was to make noise and splash in the water to scare them off.


    Ive heard(from an american 2002) that the modern american survivalmanual(military) has still today very little adecuate info on this subject.
    ( can anyone confirm this? )



    the info is from a rather dated book, ("The jaws of death" or "Les dents de la mort" by Xavier Maniguet 1991 ISBN91-7054-703-3 ) but I like it bcause it dsnt contain the usual hysteria and it contains very sound critisism on earlier "facts". Ive read newer books wichs seem more outdated.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


    Does anyone have any info about these pilots stories or
    the american survivalmanual (1941 ?). If u do plz include a source of some kind .


    Obs!

    I dont need any info about sharks!( unless it is prehistorical sharks) just ww2 encounters with this animal.
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  3. #3
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    -
    -
    - one suposed advice was to punch the shark and then
    - grab and ride on its back until it got exhausted and
    - then just cut his belly and it would die....if it
    - didnt chicken out first when it was punched on the
    - nose..( bcause sharks was cowards.)
    -

    Riding them isn't recommendable at all, but as far as I know, sharks don't often like to eat things which will potentially defend themselves. I can't produce sources but I've definitely heard of recent studies saying that attempting to eye gouge or punch the snout of a shark is a good way to make it give up an attack.

    Anyhow.

    Good luck with finding info, I'd be interested to know too. Certainly splashing in the water and making noise is just going to put pilots and navy personel on the menu :<




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  4. #4
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    Punching them in the snout and the eye gouge are the only ways I know of to discourage a continued attack (if they are that close they prolly are already munchin on ya).

    Splashing, making noise, increased heart rate, etc. only make one look like prey. Sometimes a shark just wants ya, no matter what you do, like in the case of some abalony divers. Other times remaining calm will fix the situation, like a woman who started screaming which attracted them and then stopped screaming and they left her alone.

    Shark behavior would also be helpful to know (although sometimes you can sense it). Kinda like with a rattlesnake, curled up doesn't mean come pet me.
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  5. #5
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    clint-ruin wrote:
    --
    --
    Riding them isn't recommendable at all, but as far
    - as I know, sharks don't often like to eat things
    - which will potentially defend themselves. I can't
    - produce sources but I've definitely heard of recent
    - studies saying that attempting to eye gouge or punch
    - the snout of a shark is a good way to make it give
    - up an attack.
    - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    I also read it have worked in a few cases involving smaller sharks (up to 2,5m).But in several studies and casedescriptions witnesses have reported the victim punching the attacker without results even if it was a big strong man, not even with objects.

    People have shot sharks several times in the head after catching them and still it took a long time for it to die. so it must be a really lucky hit if u succeed to scare one off with a punch. and i guess it happens rather seldom that u end up in such a favorable position that enables u to give it some kind of punch at all.
    And also the head is quite well protected in whiteshark and tigershark, kind of armoured infact. enabling them to punch heavy prey out of the water.(white sh.)
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  6. #6
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    During the battle of Midway (its the place where Tiger sharks are breeding), many japanese pilots and sailors were lost to the feeding frenzy.

    Especilly after IJN Carrier Shogaku and cruiser Kirishima became disabled, the crews were thrown overboard when the bomb struck their ship.

    The rest had to abandon the ship before Kirishima exploded. Obviously, many fell to the water and swam towards the other ships near by.

    But the Tiger Sharks track blood scents and started to take down the swimmer. It is unknown to this day how many crews actually lost their lives to the bomb blast and how many lost to the sharks.

    They estimate that more than 20% of fatal casualty in Kirishima, Shogaku, and Kaga were claimed by sharks and elements.
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  7. #7
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    http://www.mote.org/~rhueter/sharks/attacks.phtml

    A while ago i watched a documentary on the preying behaviour of sharks. An overly confident biologist went into the surf into chest deep water while being in company of 2 Bullsharks. He was basically up to show that human Heartrate influences shark behaviour. While he stood there still and kept his pulse low, the sharks showed no interest and ignored him, but as soon as he got nervous and his heartrate went up, the sharks too got nervous and were beginning to check him out and circle him. Quite interesting to watch.


    ============================
    The important thing in [tactics] is to suppress the enemys useful actions but allow his useless actions. However, doing this alone is defensive.

    Miyamoto Musashi (1584-1645)
    Japanese Samurai and Philosopher
    (More than 60 Victories in Hand-to-Hand combat.)
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  8. #8
    ob_swe:-
    Read "In Harm's Way". It's about the Indianapolis - the ship that delivered parts of the atom bomb to Tinian. They were torpedoed on their return trip and due to a bunch of SNAFU's the survivors were left in the water for several days. They were set upon by schools of sharks day after day. The rescuers could see men being taken as they were rescuing them. Awful stuff, but riveting reading.
    Ever see the movie "Jaws!"? That's what the shark hunter is talking about. Anyway, a good book.

    Rich [img]/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif[/img]

    <Center> <Center>I've got 140 109's cornered over Berlin!

    Message Edited on 09/26/0305:05PM by RichardI
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  9. #9
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    Read "Fire In The Sky" by E. Bergerud. South Pacific air combat.
    VERY FEW pilots, Japanese or Allied, survived being shot down in the South Pacific. Sharks were but one of the reasons.

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  10. #10
    XyZspineZyX
    Guest
    you must be talking about the Mi***a cruiser of which about 1000 died, and some other carrier, maybe Soryu, or Kaga. Akagi and Hiryu AFAIK were abandoned orderly. Shokaku was sunk during the Marianas Turkey shoot on the 19th June 1944, by 3 torpedo hits from an american submarine(I think Albacore).

    I did not know the place around Midway was a breeding pool of sharks... interesting stuff[img]/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif[/img]

    I watched a film about the Indianapolis, it was called "mission Shark" or sumthing like that. Very striking!!!

    http://www.triplane.net/190view.htm


    "All that is gold does not glitter,
    Not all those who wander are lost;
    The old that is strong does not wither,
    Deep roots are not reached by the frost.

    From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
    A light from the shadows shall spring;
    Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
    The crownless again shall be king."
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