Thread: Rocksmith Encore - Guitar Upgrades with Brian Poedy - Discussion | Forums

  1. #1

    Rocksmith Encore - Guitar Upgrades with Brian Poedy - Discussion

    Brian Poedy re-assembled a Strat-style guitar on the Rocksmith Encore Twitch stream in part 1 of 3:
    https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1705528...XBsIeeV7uBSiFA

    In part 2 of 3, he performed some upgrades (routing for a humbucker, upgrading the tremolo -- including dowelling and re-drilling for post inserts -- wiring, new tuners and swapping pickup magnets):
    https://www.twitch.tv/videos/174086240

    The final installment will discuss setup and adjustments. There were several questions and responses through the chat, but not everything was answered or could be covered during the stream.

    So -- did you have questions or comments about what was presented by Brian? Topics that you'd like to see in the remaining section?

    Between UbiSF employees and other folks around the forums there are several decades of experience owning, maintaining and modifying guitars and basses. What would you like to know?
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    If anyone has any questions I'm happy to answer them here. The stream was on a tight schedule so we had to gloss over a lot of things. If you want me to elaborate on anything let me know!
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  3. #3
    ZagatoZee's Avatar Member
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    Brian, I think perhaps one of the more useful things would be to list the most basic of tools you believe are needed for guitar maintenance. Do I need the special Japanese only version of a Philips Head screwdriver (as James May would suggest I do) - to remove a scratch plate?

    You obviously mentioned a few while assembling, but I imagine a convenient list would be handy for some people (along with a quick bit on WHAT they are used for.
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  4. #4
    The tools you need really depends on how deep you want to go into maintenance and setup. Most guitars are just held together with an assortment of philips head screws. I think I used three different philips head screwdrivers/driver bits to put the guitar back together on the Twitch stream, that was it.

    Pickup height adjustment screws are often flat heat, as are the intonation screws on a tune-o-matic bridge.

    Truss Rod adjustment is usually done with an allen wrench on a lot of guitars, but Gibson uses a 5/16" nut, most heel adjusted Fender style necks will use a large flat head screwdriver, and then there are the wheel adjusters that are gaining popularity with the likes of Ernie Ball which use a rod or an allen wrench.

    Intonation and saddle height adjustment is usually done with a variety of allen wrenches and most guitars will come with the specific ones that they need.

    If you have a screwdriver set and a set of allen wrenches there won't be much in terms of basic maintenance that you can't do.

    If you want to properly intonate a Floyd Rose tremolo that requires a special tool

    The other big thing is a good soldering iron. For guitar wiring I use a Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station. There are irons out there with better heat control, but guitar wiring is fairly simple compared to working with PCBs so you don't need extremely fine control.

    When you start getting into repair you start getting into the more specialized tools.
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    The tools you need really depends on how deep you want to go into maintenance and setup. Most guitars are just held together with an assortment of philips head screws. I think I used three different philips head screwdrivers/driver bits to put the guitar back together on the Twitch stream, that was it.

    Pickup height adjustment screws are often flat heat, as are the intonation screws on a tune-o-matic bridge.

    Truss Rod adjustment is usually done with an allen wrench on a lot of guitars, but Gibson uses a 5/16" nut, most heel adjusted Fender style necks will use a large flat head screwdriver, and then there are the wheel adjusters that are gaining popularity with the likes of Ernie Ball which use a rod or an allen wrench.

    Intonation and saddle height adjustment is usually done with a variety of allen wrenches and most guitars will come with the specific ones that they need.

    If you have a screwdriver set and a set of allen wrenches there won't be much in terms of basic maintenance that you can't do.

    If you want to properly intonate a Floyd Rose tremolo that requires a special tool

    The other big thing is a good soldering iron. For guitar wiring I use a Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station. There are irons out there with better heat control, but guitar wiring is fairly simple compared to working with PCBs so you don't need extremely fine control.

    When you start getting into repair you start getting into the more specialized tools.
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    RussG081410's Avatar Member
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    Just had a chance to watch. Great stuff. Thanks for showing this stuff. Question for you Poedy. You talked about putting on Hipstop tuners. I have an Epi Prophecy plus custom GX. It has Grover 14:1 tuners now. I think I would like the Hipshots but witch ones do I get and would I have to drill anything or would they fit with no modifications? Thanks in advance....
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    The Hipshot Griplock tuners are the ones that I have been using and really like. They're available from Amazon, or Ebay, or any number of retailers. (I'm assuming your hardware is gold.)

    The tuner and bushing holes are likely going to be the right size from the Grovers to these, the only question is do the screws line up with the existing holes. I just checked one of these tuners against an Ephiphone in the office and it looks as though the screw is closer to the center of the tuner on the Hipshot, so if you wanted to use the screws you would have to drill new holes. This is pretty straight forward and I'll go over it on our Twitch channel on Monday the 11th.

    BUT! One of the cool things about the Hipshots is that they come with a "Universal Mounting Plate", which lets you install the tuners without drilling any holes if you want to go that route.
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    RussG081410's Avatar Member
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    Awesome. Thanks again for the info...
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  9. #9
    UbiVertigo's Avatar Community Manager
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    Hey everyone -- Part Two of Poedy's "Guitar Upgrades" Encore presentation will stream live on Monday the 11th at 3pm PT || 6pm ET || 10pm UTC here!
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  10. #10
    I really love the stream, I really don't think 3 weeks are enough!

    I have a Strat,, of all my guitars, it's collects dust under the strings between the pick ups constantly, it has been cleaned everyday. It doesn't happen to my other guitars. I know the solution is to case it, but as it's played everyday, it's on a wall hanger. is there any anti static tips I should be using, would copper tape prevent this on the reverse of the scratch plate. If you use copper tape in general does this need grounding?

    Could you also post a copy of the blend circuit you did please, I really want to try that.

    Also did I notice a bleed circuit for the volume?
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  11. #11


    This is the no-load/blend pot referenced above. Not all blend pots will be stamped with this part number, only those from this supplier.

    So the blend pot has to be a "no-load" pot or it will constantly allow the neck or bridge pickup to bleed through. The no-load pot takes the pot completely out of the circuit when it is turned up to 10. I wanted to show how to make the no-load pot, but we just ran out of time on Monday. They are available from any number of sources.
    I also used a no-load pot for the tone so that is taken out of the circuit when the tone is tuned all the way up as well.

    I didn't use a treble bleed, but it works fine with everything else here.

    250k pots are traditionally used for single coils while 500k pots get used for humbuckers. The higher the resistance of the pot the more treble comes through your signal, so the 250k pots will tame the high end of a single coil, but could make a humbucker sound muddy. But, there are no hard and fast rules for what you "must" do, it is about what works for you with a particular guitar and these electronics are a fairly inexpensive thing to experiment with.

    047uf capacitors are typically seen in Teles while .022uf is what is traditionally in strats and LPs. The higher the value of the capacitor the more treble it will send to ground as you turn the tone knob down. It will also color the sound to a certain extent even with the tone rolled all the way up, but it is fairly minimal. A no-load tone pot removed any coloration from this circuit with the tone knob at 10 because it removes this from the overall circuit.

    All of your shielding, including on the back of the pickguard should be grounded.

    I really have no idea on the dust. If I had to guess I would say it is probably static buildup in the plastic of the pickguard.
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