1. #41
    Originally Posted by alustar24 Go to original post
    I just want to point out the hypocrisy here where the community got so pissed at the indicator glitch, but then another glitch comes to light that pretty much makes attacks unparryable or in some cases faster than they should be but no one cares about that.
    Not sure what you are talking about here, on forums and on various FH streams pretty much everyone outright said the unparryable unlock should go out of the game. I dont recall anyone defending it, including people who used it.
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  2. #42
    Originally Posted by alustar24 Go to original post
    I just want to point out the hypocrisy here where the community got so pissed at the indicator glitch, but then another glitch comes to light that pretty much makes attacks unparryable or in some cases faster than they should be but no one cares about that.
    An aspect that I don't think many are realizin, is it's impact on 4v4 where you actually need to be able to cycle opponents.
    Glitches are glitches and should all be fixed. The reason people are defending this one is because they abuse it, and it's handy in "high level play."

    So, no good reason at all.
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  3. #43
    This is exactly like i said before, people spamming 500ms lights with cc spam and unlock tech, they almost never parried in the game (turtle were????) and this was a high elo tournament, im glad they didnt roll out the parry changes.
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  4. #44
    There is no such thing as a "fine tech".

    When you alter a normal course of action into performing outside its designated and allowed levels that's by definition "cheating". It's simply an abuse of abnormal action.

    To an extent, even the Conq's heavy-feint and the Nobushi's light-soft feint are all something that should be ground out of the game eventually.


    Anything that's not designated UP should be possible to parry, and anything that's designated at X milliseconds should should come out only at that X milliseconds, because our reactions and tactics are built around a state of normalcy which allows it to be predictable, and therefore possible to react upon it.

    When you take that predictability away by 'changing the rule' secretly behind the other guy's back, that's simply foul.


    There is no such thing as a "fine" tech.
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  5. #45
    Originally Posted by kweassa1 Go to original post
    There is no such thing as a "fine tech".

    When you alter a normal course of action into performing outside its designated and allowed levels that's by definition "cheating". It's simply an abuse of abnormal action.

    To an extent, even the Conq's heavy-feint and the Nobushi's light-soft feint are all something that should be ground out of the game eventually.


    Anything that's not designated UP should be possible to parry, and anything that's designated at X milliseconds should should come out only at that X milliseconds, because our reactions and tactics are built around a state of normalcy which allows it to be predictable, and therefore possible to react upon it.

    When you take that predictability away by 'changing the rule' secretly behind the other guy's back, that's simply foul.


    There is no such thing as a "fine" tech.
    i agree with you but Ubi seem to disagree that why they are going to give 10k to a bug abuser .
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  6. #46
    Never seen a conqueror feint till i faced one that knew unlock tech
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  7. #47
    Originally Posted by Knight_Raime Go to original post
    sucks you feel that way. techs are pretty much essential in fighting games.
    unlock tech that speeds up attacks is perfectly fine.
    No one cares about unlock tech speeding up attacks... we care about unlock attacks being unparryable this giving an unfair advantage to the player and Cleary CLEARLY is an exploit. I really hope you aren't trying to defend the way these bastards played...
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  8. #48
    Let's make this very clear.

    The only reason fighting games have tolerated "techs" in the past is simply because up until around 2010 most fighting games were only serviced in the form of arcade machines. It was only in relatively recent years that the technological advancements in network speeds and stability have become powerful enough to support fighting games. Before 2010;

    (1) western game companies hardly ever made fighting games in the first place3
    (2) the fighting games market was dominated almost exclusively by Japanese developers who provided the games only in arcades and console ports
    (3) console networking wasn't powerful enough to support world-wide matchmaking over the internet
    (4) and therefore once a game was released there was no way to really fix bugs at all
    (5) Japanese game developers were hardly as "customer friendly" as western game developers, so they didn't even bother to patch stuff

    Cut the bullkrap of explaining "techs" as some integral part of fighting games -- which it is not. The only way the game developers could ever fix some glitch or bug in game was to simply release the next of the series in the franchise 2~3 years later. That's why things didn't get fixed, that's why people just decided to take it in as a part of the game -- BECAUSE THERE WAS NO ALTERNATIVE.

    In the end, all these "techs" do in reality is warp and force the game into unintended results to ruin the balance and integrity of the game. In almost EVERY 2D fighting game series that came as a part of the "King of Fighters" franchise from SNK since 1994 was riddled with so much "tech" krap that allowed abnormal shi* like infini-combos that just killed the balance, that the franchise basically went dead and it took SNK with it.

    On the contrary NAMCO's Tekken series remained surprisingly solid and stable throughout most of its franchise and only a handful of bugs and glitches ever existed that affected the game in any level of importance. Not only that, but NAMCO was the FIRST arcade fighting game developer that actually released a PATCHED VERSION of a title that fixed bugs and balance issues. They did this with Tekken 5, and replaced the game with Tekken 5 DR version, which became a critical success. There are almost no abnormal bugs or glitches in the Tekken series and its one of the reasons why the Tekken franchise is still alive and well despite shrinking popularity of fighting games.


    Things have changed. Even games on consoles can receive online patching and bugfixes nowadays. In this new environment THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO REASON why a glitch abuse should allowed to persist under the false pretense of some "tech" bullshi*, because abusing a known problem is no "tech". That's not even how the original term of "tech" was first used.

    The first instances of the term 'tech' came around in the early days of internet and Tekken 3 and Tekken TT -- when western gamers didn't have access to the official Japanese manuals or movelists that documented the names of moves and combat systems. So in the internet, some virtuous people had to dig up stuff and translate it by themselves and compile it into English version manuals, and other stuff they purely had to discover by themselves. The first instances of the term "tech" comes from "tech rolls" in Tekken where when you timed the buttons as your character was being knocked down, it would immediately roll away and recover its posture, ready to fight again. Western gamers that discovered how this was done compiled the information in their manuals and called it a "tech roll".

    It wasn't some secret technique or anything. It's a part of the system from the very beginning. But western gamers at first didn't know that and thought it was some kind of hidden technique, so that's when they started calling some system mechanics as "techs".

    In other words, even the term "tech" is a gross mockery and disrespectful insult to the origins of this particular fighting game jargon. The term "tech" isn't some bogus krap that's supposed to wash away your guilt of abusing bugs/glitches. "Tech" was literally a term for a part of the system western gamers didn't know about.


    So don't use the "tech is integral in any fighting game" excuse. It's INSULTING to old timers and real fighting gamers of old. Back in those days, we didn't call bug abusing behavior "tech". Bug abusing is bug abusing.
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  9. #49
    Originally Posted by AnEnticingSquid Go to original post
    No one cares about unlock tech speeding up attacks... we care about unlock attacks being unparryable this giving an unfair advantage to the player and Cleary CLEARLY is an exploit. I really hope you aren't trying to defend the way these bastards played...
    Actually, I do. I care about unlock exploits doing anything to alter the basic properties of attacks as this leads to unfair gimmicks with certain moves. If for no other reason than that all attacks are not treated equally.
    However that aside, this isn't like the dawn of fighting games where an accidental glitch ends up forming a whole new paradigm of how we designed and executed combos. This glitch isn't assisting gameplay by adding depth, and if I'm correct it's not something that's been widely discussed until recently. Reason being we can only guess at but it stands to warrant that only a select few people were even aware that this glitch was as widely usable as it is.

    I've normally been a voice of moderation, even trying to play devils advocate for Ubisoft. This is not a good look, though and I hope this gets addressed very soon.
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  10. #50
    Originally Posted by alustar24 Go to original post
    Actually, I do. I care about unlock exploits doing anything to alter the basic properties of attacks as this leads to unfair gimmicks with certain moves. If for no other reason than that all attacks are not treated equally.
    However that aside, this isn't like the dawn of fighting games where an accidental glitch ends up forming a whole new paradigm of how we designed and executed combos. This glitch isn't assisting gameplay by adding depth, and if I'm correct it's not something that's been widely discussed until recently. Reason being we can only guess at but it stands to warrant that only a select few people were even aware that this glitch was as widely usable as it is.

    I've normally been a voice of moderation, even trying to play devils advocate for Ubisoft. This is not a good look, though and I hope this gets addressed very soon.
    Agreed.

    As I've written in my post right above yours, even in the dawn of games people like me still called bug abuse as "BUG ABUSE". I dunno just when meanings became so twisted and corrupted that "tech" became an excuse for a bug abuse, but apparently it happened some time between 2005 ~ 2010... because even back in 2004 when Tekken 5 was released, people didn't call bug abuse "tech".
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