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CitizenOfDni
08-22-2005, 03:15 PM
I replayed POTS recently and noticed something weird in Er'Cana. When I look at the shiny water, the surface is flickering. It disappears and reappears constantly. Strange thing is, the shiny water in all the other Ages looks fine.

I have a Nvidia Geforce 6600GT card with the Forceware 77.77 drivers. Only when I install the older 66.93 drivers, the water in Er'Cana is normal again. 77.72 and 71.84 don't fix it. Is there a way to keep the new drivers AND solve the water-bug?

CitizenOfDni
08-22-2005, 03:15 PM
I replayed POTS recently and noticed something weird in Er'Cana. When I look at the shiny water, the surface is flickering. It disappears and reappears constantly. Strange thing is, the shiny water in all the other Ages looks fine.

I have a Nvidia Geforce 6600GT card with the Forceware 77.77 drivers. Only when I install the older 66.93 drivers, the water in Er'Cana is normal again. 77.72 and 71.84 don't fix it. Is there a way to keep the new drivers AND solve the water-bug?

Reverend Vader
08-22-2005, 11:24 PM
At this point, probably not.

It seems that the farther away we get from Uru's original release date, the "glitchier" it gets as newer and newer drivers are combined with older and older cards. And even some newer cards...

Someone else may come along with more helpful advice, however.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Heimdall_G
08-23-2005, 02:33 PM
Yeah, wot RevV said!

First, a bit about "old" video drivers.

When a new video chipset is released, there has already been lots of driver development work done by the chip manufacturer. This results in the concurrent release of an initial/basic - or "reference" - driver along with the chipset. Customization work is then usually done to allow the video card supplier to include a driver specifically tailored to their particular application of the chipset.

Initial driver releases are rarely, if ever, without problems. As these problems are discovered, a new driver is released to correct them. Thus, there is typically a series of driver versions for most video cards.

The chipset suppliers, especially ATI and NVIDIA, have been much more active in releasing driver updates than the video card suppliers. ATI and NVIDIA both employ the "running driver update" concept, that is, their updated drivers include the improvements from all of the earlier updates. This means that the latest driver includes the update code for not only the latest chipset, but also for most of the previous chipsets.

This sounds neat, but unfortunately the results are ever-increasing driver code complexity, chance for errors, and update file size. The increased chance for errors is evidenced by the release of an update and the immediate release of the next update when an "oops" is discovered. And, since the latest update's focus is on the latest chipset, it's unlikely that there are any significant revisions (except for maybe transcription errors) to the driver code for the earlier chipsets included in the latest update.

So, an "old" driver is less complex, more specific to previous chipsets, less likely to have code that could cause problems with the previous chipsets (like function calls to capabilities that those chipsets don't have), etc., etc. The bottom line out of all this is that an "old" driver isn't actually old in the sense of being out of date or less functional than the latest driver for a previous chipset. In fact, the "old" driver is often better for a previous chipset than the latest driver. It's much less likely to confuse that older chipset!

OK, but what to do? If you have an NVIDIA chipset, you can:
-- a. Right-click on a blank area of the Desktop, then click on Properties in the resulting drop-down menu.
-- b. Click on Settings > Advanced > NVIDIA card name.
-- c. You should now have the NVIDIA management menu. Click on Performance & Quality Settings and under Global driver settings, View: the Advanced settings.
-- d. Mostly, you want to set Application controlled as the defaults, and initially more things 'off' than 'on', but play around with the settings until you find a combination that satisfies!
-- e. If you change any settings, don't forget to click on Apply. Then click on OK > OK to exit to the Desktop.

CitizenOfDni
08-23-2005, 02:39 PM
I found the cause of this problem. I had the option 'Vertical Sync' turned on in the drivers. When turned off, everything is fine again. This bug caused extreme graphical glitches in the final chamber in Ahnonay as well. Strange that it only seems to affect the POTS Ages.

Too bad Vsync must be off, because without it, you get that ugly 'tearing' effect when moving around too quickly. Oh well...