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DKoor
05-21-2008, 05:01 PM
OK I need a bit help on this one... I've run across some stuff on the net about these 2-mile standards (3,219m)... and since I usually run around 3 miles per day, I thought it would be nice to undertake this test sometimes, to see in which condition am I... so I wonder is there some nice site that gives an insight about this? I was able to dig up some figure how it is gawdlike if you manage to cross it in 12mins or less... some guy was asking a program which will enable him to do it in 12mins...
I'm asking because my google skills suck... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

Also, I'm using an opportunity to ask you guys whether some of you also like to run?
IIRC LStarosta was talking about these issues on a few occasions http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif .

Taylortony
05-21-2008, 05:12 PM
UK version

TA ( Reserves )

http://www.army.mod.uk/linkedfiles/tayforth/ta_bpfa_cft_guide.pdf

http://www.army.mod.uk/rmonre/training_header/fit_to_fight.htm

http://www.arrse.co.uk/wiki/Fitness

jarink
05-21-2008, 05:42 PM
The US Army has different time standards (and rep counts for pushups and situps) depending on one's age and gender. There also used to be a 3-mile walk test for those over 40 years old or by special circumstance (determined by a military physician), but I don't know if that's still the case.

APFT Charts (http://usmilitary.about.com/od/army/a/afpt.htm) (Army Physical Fitness Test)

M2morris
05-21-2008, 06:43 PM
Well, I'm not gonna tell all about my former PT test been there- did that **** while in the Army. (I ran 26.2 marathons and I used to max-out the PT tests)but if you run 3 miles a day then you are doing great.
A 6 minute mile on the US army PT test will get you a real-good score.
But you have to be able to do that after 2 minutes of push-ups and 2 minutes of sit-ups, so your energy on the run will be affected by that.I think the standard there was a 10 minute break between events, but I am a little beer tippsy right now, so somebody may correct me on that.

horseback
05-21-2008, 07:25 PM
Ran Cross-Country in high school many years ago(according to my son, my times were recorded on clay tablets), so I have some insight into the issue.

An average guy (under 35) in good shape should be able to run a single mile in approximately six minutes, two in 13:30 or so, and three in 20 to 21 minutes. If he has a masochistic streak, he should be able to knock those times down considerably.

Most people are NOT in good shape.

If you're in shape, 4 minutes of maxing out on your pushups and situps will not affect your time in a three mile run. They are anaerobic exercises, working muscles you use only peripherally to run; they won't sap your endurance, and they aren't going to be sore until the next day (which they won't be at all if you are in GOOD shape).

By the bye, I ran my Navy 1.5 mile fitness run in a bit over 8 minutes at age 27 (I pushed it a bit so that I could lap <1/2 mile laps> LT McCartney, who was and probably still is a horse's patoot). The requirement for an old guy like me at that time (1980) was something like 17 minutes.

This was two hours before my daily 4k swimming workout. My thighs and calves cramped up on me big time, so do not try that at home. The look on Mr. McCartney's face made it well worth it though.

cheers

horseback

PS- I'd have scored 100s across the board, according to jarink's link

Choctaw111
05-21-2008, 08:57 PM
I cannot remember the length of the break between the push ups, sit ups and the two mile run. There is a minimum time between events though.
I am not one to mention my accomplishments normally, but my best two mile run, and was done during my 12th year in the Army, was 11:16...and I am very proud of that...outrunning guys nearly half my age http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
The Army around the the year 2000 restructured how the PT test worked. Originally the younger you were, the harder it was to "max it out". The Army then reconsidered this, and changed things somewhat, and took into consideration that the first few years you were in the Army, assuming you enlisted at age 18, you were constantly getting into better shape, so therefore in your mid to late 20's, it was MORE difficult to max out your PT test than when you were 18, or 35.
In short, the Army maximum time requirements for the 2 mile run increased as you got older, but maxing out the points (100 per event, or a faster time in the 2 mile run) got more difficult as you approached your mid 20's and then gradually went back up again. It is confusing unless you can take a good look at the scoring chart...which I don't have handy.

M2morris
05-21-2008, 10:04 PM
Originally posted by horseback:
issue.

An average guy (under 35) in good shape should be able to run a single mile in approximately six minutes, two in 13:30 or so, and three in 20 to 21 minutes. If he has a masochistic streak, he should be able to knock those times down considerably.

Most people are NOT in good shape.

If you're in shape, 4 minutes of maxing out on your pushups and situps will not affect your time in a three mile run. They are anaerobic exercises, working muscles you use only peripherally to run; they won't sap your endurance, and they aren't going to be sore until the next day (which they won't be at all if you are in GOOD shape).

By the bye, I ran my Navy 1.5 mile fitness run in a bit over 8 minutes at age 27 (I pushed it a bit so that I could lap <1/2 mile laps> LT McCartney, who was and probably still is a horse's patoot). The requirement for an old guy like me at that time (1980) was something like 17 minutes.

This was two hours before my daily 4k swimming workout. My thighs and calves cramped up on me big time, so do not try that at home. The look on Mr. McCartney's face made it well worth it though.

cheers

horseback

PS- I'd have scored 100s across the board, according to jarink's link
What you are saying sounds like a bunch of **** to me.
I was in GOOD shape. I could run a 5 minute mile. But after doing 100 push ups in 2 minutes, then 80 or 90 sit ups in 2 minutes, my emmediate-following 2 mile run time would be reduced alot.

jadger
05-21-2008, 11:53 PM
I'm 21, at my age to enlist in the Canadian Army you gotta be able to run 2.4kms (1.5 miles) in under 12 minutes, and do 19 situps and 19 pushups. I know, kinda pitiful the requirements, but we need more recruits, and basic training was extended 4 weeks in order to get the less fit ppl into shape.

Canadian Forces physicaly fitness guide (http://www.forces.ca/media/_PDF/physical_fitness_en.pdf)

ffb
05-22-2008, 01:38 AM
Well I retired from the R.E.M.E. in 1991 at 40, but before then...it was 3 miles total

First mile and a half was in a squad and had to take 15 mins...then we were given the off to run individually back the mile and a half

I think 11 and a half mins were the max for youngsters...and increased to 12 or more as your age increased (30+)

it was dressed in T-shirt, long green pants and army boots (they were what made it more difficult)
I never had any problems passing....but never tried to kill myself either.

DKoor
05-22-2008, 05:13 AM
Thanks for input guys... I appreciate it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif .

Worf101
05-22-2008, 07:20 AM
PT Test???!!!

PT TEST???!!!!

Did someone mention a friggen PT Test??!!!

God have some mercy on an old ex-serviceman will ya and don't mention the following:

PT Tests

Guard Duty

Morning PT

Field Exercises

TDY to anywhere that even remotely has a chance of seeing snow.

TDY or deployment to anyplace where the local religion forbids drinking or fornicatin'.

Did I mention PT Tests?

Da Worfster

jarink
05-22-2008, 10:33 AM
Since people seem to be trying to one-up each other...

I NEVER maxed my PT test. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

I usually scored somewhere in the upper 70s/low 80s. That fact never bothered me one bit in my 11+ years in the Army. It also never changed my opinion that there is a big difference between maxing a PT test an ability to do one's job, especially when in the field for extended periods of time. This goes double for some of the older females that maxed their tests and were literally useless as t*ts on a boar hog when it was crunch time.


Originally posted by Choctaw111:
The Army then reconsidered this, and changed things somewhat, and took into consideration that the first few years you were in the Army, assuming you enlisted at age 18, you were constantly getting into better shape, so therefore in your mid to late 20's, it was MORE difficult to max out your PT test than when you were 18, or 35.

I find that hilarious and I'll tell you why. Before going to basic, I rode my bicycle or walked everywhere, as I didn't have a car. So, my legs were in pretty good shape. Comparing my initial and final 2-mile run times from Basic, my time actually increased by nearly two minutes! I attributed this to shuffling through formation runs nearly every day instead of being allowed to run at my own pace. Needless to say, the Drills weren't impressed with my time or explanation.

Monterey13
05-22-2008, 10:45 AM
Originally posted by Worf101:
PT Test???!!!

PT TEST???!!!!

Did someone mention a friggen PT Test??!!!

God have some mercy on an old ex-serviceman will ya and don't mention the following:

PT Tests

Guard Duty

Morning PT

Field Exercises

TDY to anywhere that even remotely has a chance of seeing snow.

TDY or deployment to anyplace where the local religion forbids drinking or fornicatin'.

Did I mention PT Tests?

Da Worfster


You forgot...

KP duty (or mess cranking)

Road Marches

Inspections

Reveille

horseback
05-22-2008, 12:40 PM
Originally posted by M2morris:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by horseback:
If you're in shape, 4 minutes of maxing out on your pushups and situps will not affect your time in a three mile run. They are anaerobic exercises, working muscles you use only peripherally to run; they won't sap your endurance, and they aren't going to be sore until the next day (which they won't be at all if you are in GOOD shape).

By the bye, I ran my Navy 1.5 mile fitness run in a bit over 8 minutes at age 27 (I pushed it a bit so that I could lap <1/2 mile laps> LT McCartney, who was and probably still is a horse's patoot). The requirement for an old guy like me at that time (1980) was something like 17 minutes.

This was two hours before my daily 4k swimming workout. My thighs and calves cramped up on me big time, so do not try that at home. The look on Mr. McCartney's face made it well worth it though.

cheers

horseback

PS- I'd have scored 100s across the board, according to jarink's link
What you are saying sounds like a bunch of **** to me.
I was in GOOD shape. I could run a 5 minute mile. But after doing 100 push ups in 2 minutes, then 80 or 90 sit ups in 2 minutes, my emmediate-following 2 mile run time would be reduced alot. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>I'm not exactly a physically normal guy who was in GOOD shape--I was an elite athlete during my teens who competed at a high level in endurance events.

I ran cross country on the Arizona state AAA runners up and swam the 500, 1000, and 1500 yard freestyle. I was the champ in all three events for my local ten team high school division. My high school swim team was undefeated in dual meets for all three years I competed at the varsity level, so I was very well coached. I won the 1500 for the state, and the guys who beat me in the other events swam at Munich a year later...

My Navy fitness test also included max pullups and situps in two minute periods, with a two minute break between each session. I maxed each some time before two minutes (okay, it was the Navy and I got too much leeway for being over 25, but still), and simply stopped and rested for the next event. Neither left me remotely winded (not much did at that point in my life) or worked any muscles I needed to run at a reasonably steady pace. Any 'kinks' were worked out in the first half mile or so.

The simple fact was that I did a lot of situps and pullups every day anyway, and that I was light enough (135 lbs) that a 'max' effort wasn't an exceptional strain. I was able to handle the inconvenience for the 8:30 or so, and paid the soreness price over the next couple of days, mostly in the thighs and calves.

By the way, I was swimming my daily 4000m at the NAB Coronado Enlisted Pool, where the USN's SEALs are based. I beat most of them regularly in the freestyle laps, so I guess I still had the knack. It took me 2 hours to complete my normal swimming workout, which started with a 2000m 'warmup', which should give you a clue about the effort involved in swimming laps.

A 400m 'sprint' is analogous to a mile run, in terms of the time it takes: most who have done both at a high level agree that swimming is a LOT more work...

By the way, I ran my last timed mile in May of 1971: it was 4:08.6. I can only wonder how low I could have gotten it if I wasn't on the swim team that spring...

cheers

horseback

DKoor
05-22-2008, 01:19 PM
Hey horseback, you are sick http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif .
That is an outstanding result.
...
Eh, anyway I just got back from a light training, jogging with my girlfriend http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif.
Did 3 light miles with her, then pressed hard 2 more miles solo http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif .

There's nothing that is quite like this running thing; when you feel like sheite and at the same time wanting to puke from exhaustion http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif .

DKoor
05-22-2008, 01:23 PM
I just did a quick calculation; it appears that your average run speed was around 23,5km/h! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Choctaw111
05-22-2008, 01:35 PM
Originally posted by Worf101:
PT Test???!!!

PT TEST???!!!!

Did someone mention a friggen PT Test??!!!

God have some mercy on an old ex-serviceman will ya and don't mention the following:

PT Tests

Guard Duty

Morning PT

Field Exercises

TDY to anywhere that even remotely has a chance of seeing snow.

TDY or deployment to anyplace where the local religion forbids drinking or fornicatin'.

Did I mention PT Tests?

Da Worfster

What about KP? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Edit... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif I see Monterey already mentioned that one. Sorry pal.

What about "Fire Guard" for you Army people http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Monterey13
05-22-2008, 02:15 PM
I remember running 6 miles in the morning and ending up at the chow hall. Walk around a bit, then puke, then go in and eat breakfast. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

horseback
05-22-2008, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by DKoor:
I just did a quick calculation; it appears that your average run speed was around 23,5km/h! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif If that works out to a bit over 14.5 mph, you're right--and I felt winded for the rest of the day (oxygen debt). I stand in awe of people who can get under 3:50, because God has truly made them for running.

Seriously though, I found it far better to swim in the springtime in Arizona than to run; this was before the benefits of proper hydration were fully understood, and the track coach was one of those idiots who thought that depriving us of water during training or meets would make us 'tougher.'

The swimming coach was tough, but not even he could keep us from getting a drink while doing our required laps (and I didn't look like some concentration camp survivor from the waist up).

cheers

horseback

Worf101
05-23-2008, 06:38 AM
Originally posted by Monterey13:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Worf101:
PT Test???!!!

PT TEST???!!!!

Did someone mention a friggen PT Test??!!!

God have some mercy on an old ex-serviceman will ya and don't mention the following:

PT Tests

Guard Duty

Morning PT

Field Exercises

TDY to anywhere that even remotely has a chance of seeing snow.

TDY or deployment to anyplace where the local religion forbids drinking or fornicatin'.

Did I mention PT Tests?

Da Worfster


You forgot...

KP duty (or mess cranking)

Road Marches

Inspections

Reveille </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Oh Monty, if the Squadron didn't need you so much (and some of them actually LIKE you) I'd hit you with a wood knot. If I couldn't stand my list what makes you think I want you to mention the rest of that torture...

Da Worfster...

PS - Inspections were Okay, I.G. Inspections... were NOT.