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Goose_Green
08-25-2007, 12:46 PM
RealJambo has just brought back an old thread he started regarding his U-Boat book collection, and it has reminded me of an old thread, probably page 50 odd by now, about what book you are reading now. So I thought I would start the discussion again with a new thread.

So, What are you reading now? It doesn't have to be U-Boat related.

I will kick start this with my current read;

Inside the Third Reich - Albert Speer

It's quite an absorbing read and fairly easy to follow too and on the whole his experiences are quite interesting, although I'm still in the period before the war it will be interesting as to what details are revealed later on. And by the way, I picked this up for a steal - £6.97 from Tesco'shttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n235/Goose_Green/IMG_0664.jpg

WilhelmSchulz.
08-25-2007, 01:02 PM
Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden

U301
08-25-2007, 01:46 PM
"The Truth About Mohammed"- Robert Spencer.
This subject is so PC that I will not go into it here!
Surphise to say that I will stay a Christian.
KUrtz

Realjambo
08-25-2007, 01:56 PM
Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden


Good read. I read it before I saw the film. I often find the books better than the films.

Currently reading "Ark Royal" by Mike Rossiter. A fascinating recount of it's birth, the action it saw, it's sinking, and subsequent finding on the sea bed. I'd recommend it so far http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif and it's a steal at Tesco's!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/arkroyal-1.jpg

Goose_Green
08-25-2007, 02:02 PM
Hah! I saw that one too RJ http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I was going to get it but I got the Albert Speer book instead, plus I also picked up Alan Clark's Barbarossa - again another steal from Tesco's.

Mind you every time I do a trailer swap at a distribution centre near the Tesco at Lakeside shopping centre in West Thurrock I end up coming back home with ANOTHER book! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

andy3536
08-25-2007, 02:50 PM
My last book was a book called The forgotten soldier, by Guy Sajer.
Great read about a french boy, who got called up to the german army as he has a german mother.
Some great reading of the war on the russian front.

Next book not yet started, Pegasus bridge, by Stephen E Ambrose.
Suprised i never read it before.

GerritJ9
08-25-2007, 03:09 PM
History of the RNethN in WW2, vol. 2, which deals with the Japanese invasion of the NEI.

Rugbyfan1972
08-25-2007, 06:17 PM
I forget the full title, but it is the biography of Harry Patch, the last tommy to have fought in the trenches in WW1.

Grymmjakk
08-25-2007, 06:49 PM
Stole my brothers collection of Jack Higgins books...he has around 20 or so going back to the 60's http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif 4 down 15 &1/2 to go http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Anti_Ship_Fella
08-26-2007, 01:20 AM
Cinderella http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Celeon999
08-26-2007, 02:01 AM
Still reading

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/412NMVJ695L._SS500_.jpg

NaKacu
04-15-2008, 10:36 PM
been a while since this thread stopped being active, but none-the-less, the question is timeless.

My reads: "Convoy" (bit boring - I am giving it a break for now) so just got a book from the library yesterday "Dark Sky, Deep Water". Can't seem to put this darn thing down and go to bed in a timely fashion. Interesting collection of WWII accounts...

Goose_Green
04-15-2008, 11:31 PM
It still amazes me that old threads come to resurface now and then http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif But since this thread is still on the surface I will add my current book;

"Pursuit - The sinking of the Bismarck" by Ludovic Kennedy.

VikingGrandad
04-16-2008, 12:45 AM
The last book I read was called 'We Die Alone: A World War Two Epic of Escape and Endurance' by David Howarth, which is one of those books that's almost impossible to put down. Description from Amazon:

"In March 1943 a team of expatriate Norwegian commandos sailed from the Shetland Islands for Nazi-occupied Norway. Their mission was to organise and support the Norwegian resistance. They were betrayed. And only one man survived a terrifying ambush by Nazi soldiers. This is the incredible and gripping story of his escape. Crippled by frostbite and snow-blind, hunted by the Germans, Jan Baalsrud, the sole survivor, managed to find a tiny Arctic village. There, delirious and close to death, he found villagers willing to risk their lives to save him. We Die Alone is his incredible story - an incomparable epic of survival in the most hostile conditions."

I highly recommend it!


I'm currently just finishing 'By Tank Into Normandy' by Stuart Hills, which was a little tedious at first but soon transforms into an exciting account of tank warfare when the author experiences his first taste of battle on the beaches of Normandy D-Day - followed by many brutal battles during the Allies' advance across France, Belgium, Holland and Germany.

Realjambo
04-16-2008, 03:49 AM
"Pursuit - The sinking of the Bismarck" by Ludovic Kennedy

Great book Goose! I finished that one a while ago. I am now reading The Bomber Boys (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bomber-Boys-Fighting-Back-1940-1945/dp/0007192150) by Patrick Bishop, really enjoying it too.

hueywolf123
04-16-2008, 04:15 AM
Originally posted by NaKacu:
been a while since this thread stopped being active, but none-the-less, the question is timeless.

My reads: "Convoy" (bit boring - I am giving it a break for now) so just got a book from the library yesterday "Dark Sky, Deep Water". Can't seem to put this darn thing down and go to bed in a timely fashion. Interesting collection of WWII accounts... .

I must agree, anyone wishing to read a full account of coastal commands U-Boat hunting - from both sides, should read this.
My Uncle Ronnie, was shot down by U-343 after he found her of the Costa del sol, Spain, at midnight in Feb '43.
Many thanks to the U-Bootskreig Archiv, for their help in my finding his final resting place. The RAF were useless, and refused to help. U-Boot Archiv even sent me U-343's log records of the event. But yes, an excellent read.

Subject_rod
04-16-2008, 04:54 AM
Finished Vause's book "The Story of Wolfgang Lüth" yesterday and about to start Herbert Werner's "Iron Coffins"...

Realjambo
04-16-2008, 05:11 AM
What did you make of the 'Story of Wolfgang Luth' Subject_rod?

Parabellum9x19
04-16-2008, 06:09 AM
http://www.bunkertours.de/Bunkertour/Literatur/Bilder/Die-Festung-gkl.jpg

Buchheim's epic 1000+ pages semi-fictional story about his journey through France and Germany in late 1944.
If you liked "Das Boot" you will love this one too. Strongly recommended! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

VikingGrandad
04-16-2008, 04:52 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
I am now reading The Bomber Boys (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bomber-Boys-Fighting-Back-1940-1945/dp/0007192150) by Patrick Bishop, really enjoying it too.

I really enjoyed that book too. Very well written, and very educational. I particularly liked the way the author seamlessly describes the story of the RAF's strategic bombing campaign from the point of view of the bomber crews (the 'Many') all the way up to the Chiefs of Staff and the War Cabinet. It's certainly a book I'll read again. In fact, I should get myself a copy of Patrick Bishop's previous book - 'Fighter Boys' (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fighter-Boys-Saving-Britain-1940/dp/0006532047/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208385968&sr=8-1).

VikingGrandad
04-16-2008, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by Parabellum9x19:
http://www.bunkertours.de/Bunkertour/Literatur/Bilder/Die-Festung-gkl.jpg

Buchheim's epic 1000+ pages semi-fictional story about his journey through France and Germany in late 1944.
If you liked "Das Boot" you will love this one too. Strongly recommended! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

After enjoying the 'Das Boot' novel, I'd really like to read this book - but I don't think it's ever been translated from German to English http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

WilhelmSchulz.
04-16-2008, 05:05 PM
My current book.
http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/9594/picture007ba8.jpg

Parabellum9x19
04-16-2008, 07:16 PM
Originally posted by VikingGrandad:
After enjoying the 'Das Boot' novel, I'd really like to read this book - but I don't think it's ever been translated from German to English http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Hmm, it seems you are right. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Mittelwaechter
04-17-2008, 05:35 AM
I'd recommend "Ishmael" by Daniel Quinn.

Kaleun1961
04-17-2008, 08:04 AM
Originally posted by Goose_Green:
RealJambo has just brought back an old thread he started regarding his U-Boat book collection, and it has reminded me of an old thread, probably page 50 odd by now, about what book you are reading now. So I thought I would start the discussion again with a new thread.

So, What are you reading now? It doesn't have to be U-Boat related.

I will kick start this with my current read;

Inside the Third Reich - Albert Speer

It's quite an absorbing read and fairly easy to follow too and on the whole his experiences are quite interesting, although I'm still in the period before the war it will be interesting as to what details are revealed later on. And by the way, I picked this up for a steal - £6.97 from Tesco'shttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n235/Goose_Green/IMG_0664.jpg

I read Speer's book some time ago. Interesting read, but of course as with any personality describing his role in history, you may sense a certain amount of "self-sanitation." Still, it is a worthy addition to the library of any WW2 enthusiast.

My current book is "The Renewable Energy Handbook" by William Kemp, a Canadian enthusiast for renewable energy. My friend let me borrow it, as he has recently started a renewable energy business. His company is called "Homegrown Energy." I'm interested in selling up my current home and moving to the countryside and either building a home or retrofitting one with self generated power; part of my plan to ease into a more autonomous lifestyle. But first, I must educate myself on what is involved and thus this book is a good start. I recommend it to anybody interested in any kind of home energy project, anything from solar water heating to full off-grid living.

Kaleun1961
04-17-2008, 08:05 AM
Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz.:
Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden

Good read. I was also impressed that the movie of the same title was very true to the book.

The_Silent_O
04-17-2008, 12:05 PM
I'm currently trying to finish Atkinson's "An Army at Dawn", the first book of his trilogy:

http://www.liberationtrilogy.com/

It is really a well written narrative history. He really gets into all the personalities as well as being a good read of all the battles in North Africa. All here would enjoy reading it. I have no idea if it has been translated yet into other languages.

Celeon999
04-18-2008, 03:48 AM
Celeon cannot resist and will have a look at Jeremy Clarkson's new book http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif



In And Another Thing...

the king of the exasperated quip discovers that :

- bombing North Carolina is bad for Yorkshire

- we can look forward to exploding at the age of 62

- Russians look bad in Speedos. But not as bad as we brits do

- wasps are the highest form of life



http://www.pitstop.net.au/upload/products/18434.jpg

Subject_rod
04-18-2008, 08:29 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
What did you make of the 'Story of Wolfgang Luth' Subject_rod? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif can only give it a "Highly recommended"!
Despite the man being a convinced nazi, I kinda like him and especially his way of taking care of his crew.
Btw. it wasn't until the very last pages of the book, I suddenly remembered having seen a documentary of the man and his unhappy ending... which is not to be unveiled here. http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z15/subject_rod/smilies/pleased2.gif


Originally posted by Mittelwaechter :
I'd recommend "Ishmael" by Daniel Quinn. http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z15/subject_rod/smilies/scratch.gif have to check to see what that's about...

Von_Mullett
04-19-2008, 04:33 AM
Don Quixote

mllaneza
04-19-2008, 05:28 PM
Just finished Lyn Macdonald's "Somme", part of her WW1 series based on first-hand accounts. gripping stuff. Currently reading Steven Brust's Phoenix Guards to clear my palette and return to a time when duty and honor meant something.