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View Full Version : How to Choose and Join a Clan



XyZspineZyX
04-12-2003, 10:04 AM
This post is intened to give new players some practical how-to advice on choosing and joining RVS clans (i.e., teams).

So, in determining whether a team is a good fit, you might consider:
* personality/interaction style
* maturity of members (sometimes age-related)
* reputation (for skill, fair play, integrity or cheating)
* geography/time zones
* teamwork (whether from formal training and practice or informal experience on the servers)
* tactical seriousness vs. focus on fun
* training (usually related to tactical seriousness)
* game preferences (maps, game types, restrictions etc.)
* whether they match competitively, and how often
* cost (i.e., are there dues to pay for website/servers?)
* time commitment (sessions per week)
* leadership
* formality of command structure (some have ranks based on seniority and contribution, some don't)
* stability/longevity--some RVS teams previously played earlier Rainbow 6 games or Ghost Recon

Some teams offer applications or tryouts, some recruit by invitation only and watch for promising candidates as they play, and some will take anyone, no questions asked. The better teams tend to have a selection process of some kind and want to make sure it's a good fit for everyone involved. You should too. A run and gun free spirit will not mix well with someone wanting to work together as a well-honed team. Skilled teamwork does make a difference in this game as the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Other than personality fit, the 3 main factors in selection are your individual combat ability, good teamwork and team spirit, and the ability to make the required time commitment to the game and team, including showing up as promised for scheduled matches (or practices). Attitude is critical.

Turn-offs include repeated stupidity (so fix the uniform color you want to shoot in mind for every round, check radar frequently and always before tossing frags), deliberate obnoxiouness (for some teams this can include habits like profanity, camping, or grenade spamming that other teams might not care about), shooting or blowing up friendlies (called team kills or TKs), or leaving your team in the lurch when they were expecting backup.

Not blowing friends up is the most easily avoidable hazard. Flashbanging a friend by accident is much more forgiveable than splattering him on a wall (also true in real life). Using gas grenades when the guy following you does not have a gas mask is annoying and sometimes tactically fatal to your team mate, so be careful where you use them.

On the plus side, you can show teamwork by moving and communicating effectively with friendlies and by supporting your side with equipment like the heartbeat sensor, flashbangs, or smoke grenades (but only when appropriate, as smoke can really tick off people as well). Covering the rear of a group advance or guarding hostages, bombs, or spawns can also show a good team attitude that puts the team ahead of running out to chase kills.

Don't forget to change your name from a clueless newbie's John Doe to something that fits you and maybe the personality of the kind of team you want to join. Your name says a lot about you, so take a moment to think about it (e.g., "Teamkilla" will be regarded with initial suspicion).

Team members usually have a team insignia of several letters or symbols that serves as a "uniform." Don't steal a team's uniform, especially if you want to join them. No one takes it well.

If you are interested in a team, visit and play on their server. If you are on a server, one way to break the ice with a team is to ask for their website address--a team worth joining probably has a website--and whether they have their own server. You should have ICQ for private messaging with other players, and be familiar with Roger Wilco, TeamSpeak, Ventrilo and other voice communications programs -- some servers have public com channels for players, though most com channels are team-only.

Having a good group of guys is important, but you need a core of two or better yet three or four really dedicated leaders in a team to run it and keep it going, since when the burden falls on one guy he eventually gets worn out with the job or the game, has a personal or work crisis, or otherwise can't do it anymore and then the team falls apart. Having a strong core group that can rotate duties helps ensure the team will be around for a while. Think about this before starting your own team--it is a lot of work and can lead to disappointment all round.

Many players have rudimentary tactical skills that are developed by experience. Build your tactical and teamwork skills more quickly by trying to practice accordingly and looking for online or written materials regarding fieldcraft and small unit tactics, especially CQB (close quarters battle) and MOUT (Military Operations in Urban Terrain). Knowing basic skills such as how to cross a road, clear a junction, clear a room, set an ambush, patrol formation, arcs of fire, overwatch, and movement over different kinds of terrain will put you well ahead of most new players. In addition to some specific online materials relating to the Tom Clancy series of games and other tactical shooters, there is a lot of material on police SWAT tactics which is applicable to RVS. For a mountain of military material with some good content for the serious military gamer, you can find find declassified US Army field manuals at the General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library at http://www.adtdl.army.mil/atdls.htm Only portions are directly useful, but FMs 8 and 90 covering infantry and MOUT give helpful explanation. I also recommend H.J. Poole's practical handbooks and, to put you in the right mood, "Infantry Attacks" by Rommel.

One last point: Cheaters! There are always people who want to cheat, and unfortunately all online games have some vulnerabilities for hacks and exploits. Personally, I think there's nothing more satisfying than thrashing cheaters -- they cheat except in a desperate attempt to bolster their ego with fake success and when they lose despite their cheating it just shows how lame they are. The problem with cheating and teams is that when someone cheats then the whole team is guilty by association and can be banned and reviled, so be careful who you team up with. As for what counts as cheating, configuring your options and profile is OK but changing program executable and data files is not. Glitching means intentional exploitation of geometry or other flaws in maps for tactical advantage (peeking or shooting through walls, for example), and such exploits are usually considered a lesser form of cheating.

I'm sure I've missed some good points on this issue, so please add any helpful comments below of feel free to message me. I think new players would be interested in more postings from teams not just mentioning their name but discussing their recruiting approach and where they fall in the spectrum of factors above.

Wingman NAS

http://forevertwisted.com/nas

The views expressed here are my own and not necessarily those of the NAS team or its members.

XyZspineZyX
04-12-2003, 10:04 AM
This post is intened to give new players some practical how-to advice on choosing and joining RVS clans (i.e., teams).

So, in determining whether a team is a good fit, you might consider:
* personality/interaction style
* maturity of members (sometimes age-related)
* reputation (for skill, fair play, integrity or cheating)
* geography/time zones
* teamwork (whether from formal training and practice or informal experience on the servers)
* tactical seriousness vs. focus on fun
* training (usually related to tactical seriousness)
* game preferences (maps, game types, restrictions etc.)
* whether they match competitively, and how often
* cost (i.e., are there dues to pay for website/servers?)
* time commitment (sessions per week)
* leadership
* formality of command structure (some have ranks based on seniority and contribution, some don't)
* stability/longevity--some RVS teams previously played earlier Rainbow 6 games or Ghost Recon

Some teams offer applications or tryouts, some recruit by invitation only and watch for promising candidates as they play, and some will take anyone, no questions asked. The better teams tend to have a selection process of some kind and want to make sure it's a good fit for everyone involved. You should too. A run and gun free spirit will not mix well with someone wanting to work together as a well-honed team. Skilled teamwork does make a difference in this game as the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Other than personality fit, the 3 main factors in selection are your individual combat ability, good teamwork and team spirit, and the ability to make the required time commitment to the game and team, including showing up as promised for scheduled matches (or practices). Attitude is critical.

Turn-offs include repeated stupidity (so fix the uniform color you want to shoot in mind for every round, check radar frequently and always before tossing frags), deliberate obnoxiouness (for some teams this can include habits like profanity, camping, or grenade spamming that other teams might not care about), shooting or blowing up friendlies (called team kills or TKs), or leaving your team in the lurch when they were expecting backup.

Not blowing friends up is the most easily avoidable hazard. Flashbanging a friend by accident is much more forgiveable than splattering him on a wall (also true in real life). Using gas grenades when the guy following you does not have a gas mask is annoying and sometimes tactically fatal to your team mate, so be careful where you use them.

On the plus side, you can show teamwork by moving and communicating effectively with friendlies and by supporting your side with equipment like the heartbeat sensor, flashbangs, or smoke grenades (but only when appropriate, as smoke can really tick off people as well). Covering the rear of a group advance or guarding hostages, bombs, or spawns can also show a good team attitude that puts the team ahead of running out to chase kills.

Don't forget to change your name from a clueless newbie's John Doe to something that fits you and maybe the personality of the kind of team you want to join. Your name says a lot about you, so take a moment to think about it (e.g., "Teamkilla" will be regarded with initial suspicion).

Team members usually have a team insignia of several letters or symbols that serves as a "uniform." Don't steal a team's uniform, especially if you want to join them. No one takes it well.

If you are interested in a team, visit and play on their server. If you are on a server, one way to break the ice with a team is to ask for their website address--a team worth joining probably has a website--and whether they have their own server. You should have ICQ for private messaging with other players, and be familiar with Roger Wilco, TeamSpeak, Ventrilo and other voice communications programs -- some servers have public com channels for players, though most com channels are team-only.

Having a good group of guys is important, but you need a core of two or better yet three or four really dedicated leaders in a team to run it and keep it going, since when the burden falls on one guy he eventually gets worn out with the job or the game, has a personal or work crisis, or otherwise can't do it anymore and then the team falls apart. Having a strong core group that can rotate duties helps ensure the team will be around for a while. Think about this before starting your own team--it is a lot of work and can lead to disappointment all round.

Many players have rudimentary tactical skills that are developed by experience. Build your tactical and teamwork skills more quickly by trying to practice accordingly and looking for online or written materials regarding fieldcraft and small unit tactics, especially CQB (close quarters battle) and MOUT (Military Operations in Urban Terrain). Knowing basic skills such as how to cross a road, clear a junction, clear a room, set an ambush, patrol formation, arcs of fire, overwatch, and movement over different kinds of terrain will put you well ahead of most new players. In addition to some specific online materials relating to the Tom Clancy series of games and other tactical shooters, there is a lot of material on police SWAT tactics which is applicable to RVS. For a mountain of military material with some good content for the serious military gamer, you can find find declassified US Army field manuals at the General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library at http://www.adtdl.army.mil/atdls.htm Only portions are directly useful, but FMs 8 and 90 covering infantry and MOUT give helpful explanation. I also recommend H.J. Poole's practical handbooks and, to put you in the right mood, "Infantry Attacks" by Rommel.

One last point: Cheaters! There are always people who want to cheat, and unfortunately all online games have some vulnerabilities for hacks and exploits. Personally, I think there's nothing more satisfying than thrashing cheaters -- they cheat except in a desperate attempt to bolster their ego with fake success and when they lose despite their cheating it just shows how lame they are. The problem with cheating and teams is that when someone cheats then the whole team is guilty by association and can be banned and reviled, so be careful who you team up with. As for what counts as cheating, configuring your options and profile is OK but changing program executable and data files is not. Glitching means intentional exploitation of geometry or other flaws in maps for tactical advantage (peeking or shooting through walls, for example), and such exploits are usually considered a lesser form of cheating.

I'm sure I've missed some good points on this issue, so please add any helpful comments below of feel free to message me. I think new players would be interested in more postings from teams not just mentioning their name but discussing their recruiting approach and where they fall in the spectrum of factors above.

Wingman NAS

http://forevertwisted.com/nas

The views expressed here are my own and not necessarily those of the NAS team or its members.

XyZspineZyX
09-06-2003, 06:48 PM
Nicely said. Although a somewhat lengthy post it hits everything bang on. Our team adheres to pretty much everthing you touched on.

Especially the fit. If we are interested in you, we'll get you on comms. We find you annoying on comm, or realize at that point that you dont have the maturity level it's gonzo. Politely of course. Personality is a must on our team, rated higher on the scale than is your personal skill. Not that we go around looking for crap players to train.

Some good tactical advice in your post to.
Cheers.

]http://www.rebelswithguns.com/twlsig.png (http://www.rebelswithguns.com/twlsig.png[/img)
Where a goat can go, a man can go. And where
a man can go he can take a gun.